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Legislate: All Bills

522 bills were returned.
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CA AB 10 - Gail Pellerin
Pupils: body shaming model policy and resources.
09/13/2023 - In Assembly. Concurrence in Senate amendments pending.
AB 10, as amended, Lowenthal. Pupils: body shaming model policy and resources. Existing law, the California Healthy Youth Act, states that its purposes include, among others, providing pupils with the knowledge and skills they need to develop healthy attitudes concerning body image.This bill would require the State Department of Education to, on or before June 30, 2025, and in consultation with specified entities and relevant stakeholders, develop and post on its internet website a model policy and resources about body shaming, as defined, and would encourage school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to inform teachers, staff, parents, and pupils about those resources, as provided.

CA AB 100 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
05/04/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11 a.m.
AB 100, Ting. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1001 - Matt Haney
Health facilities: behavioral health response.
07/06/2023 - In committee: Set, second hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 1001, as amended, Haney. Health facilities: behavioral health response. Existing law provides for the licensing, regulation, and inspection of various types of health facilities by the State Department of Public Health, including general acute care hospitals. Existing law requires certain building standards and regulations to prescribe standards of adequacy, safety, and sanitation of the physical plant, of staffing with duly qualified licensed personnel, and of services, based on the type of health facility and the needs of the persons served. Existing law requires specified financial and utilization data to be reported to the department by a hospital at the end of a calendar quarter.Existing law generally makes a violation of the licensure provisions for health facilities a misdemeanor.This bill would require a general acute care hospital to adopt policies for behavioral health personnel to respond to patients with a mental health or substance use crisis. The bill would require that these protocols meet standards established by the department and consist of various parameters such as minimum staffing requirements for behavioral health responses, procedures for response by behavioral health personnel in a timely manner, and annual training, as specified. The bill would require the department to adopt regulations on standards for general acute care hospitals related to behavioral health response. The bill would require all general acute care hospitals to maintain records on each patient who receives care from behavioral health response personnel and the number of hours of services provided for a period of 3 years. The bill would require hospitals to include related data in their quarterly summary utilization data reported to the department. Existing law establishes the Department of Health Care Access and Information, which is responsible for administering various programs with respect to health care professions and establishes various programs to facilitate the expansion of the health care workforce.Existing law authorizes the board of supervisors in each county to establish and maintain a county hospital to provide public health care services within the county. Existing law authorizes the board to prescribe rules for the hospital’s government and management, and to appoint a county physician and other necessary officers and employees of the hospital, as specified.This bill would establish the Behavioral Health Response and Training Fund to provide grants to qualifying applicants for the purpose of funding a new program or supporting an existing program that increases the staffing in general acute care hospitals of direct care personnel who are trained in behavioral health care and behavioral health response or intervention.The bill would also require the department to evaluate the program and report to the Legislature annually.By expanding the scope of a crime under the above paragraphs, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 101 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Act of 2023.
08/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 101, as amended, Ting. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 102 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Act of 2023.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 102, Ting. Budget Act of 2023. The Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2023 by amending, adding, and repealing items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1020 - Timothy S. Grayson
County Employees Retirement Law of 1937: disability retirement: medical conditions: employment-related presumption.
09/07/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 1020, as amended, Grayson. County Employees Retirement Law of 1937: disability retirement: medical conditions: employment-related presumption. Existing law, the County Employees Retirement Law of 1937, prescribes the rights, benefits, and duties of members of the retirement systems established pursuant to its provisions.Existing law requires, if a safety member, a firefighter member, or a member in active law enforcement who has completed 5 years or more of service develops heart trouble, that the heart trouble be presumed to arise out of and in the course of employment.This bill would require the presumption that the member’s heart trouble arose out of and in the course of employment to be extended following termination of service for a prescribed length of time not to exceed 60 months.Existing law provides that participants in certain membership categories may be entitled to special benefits if the injury that causes their disability arises in the course of their employment. Existing law creates a presumption, for purposes of qualification for disability retirement benefits for specified members, that certain injuries, including, but not limited to, a bloodborne infectious disease or a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infection, arose out of and in the course of employment. Existing law authorizes the presumption to be rebutted by evidence to the contrary, but unless controverted, the applicable governing board of a public retirement system is required to find in accordance with the presumption.This bill would expand the scope of this presumption to include additional injuries, including post-traumatic stress disorder, tuberculosis, skin cancer, lower back impairments, Lyme disease, hernia, pneumonia, and meningitis, if the injury develops or manifests while a member, as defined, is in a specified job classification, or additionally if the injury develops or manifests within a prescribed length of time following the termination of the member’s employment in the specified job classification. With respect to skin cancer, this bill would additionally require the member to have worked for 3 consecutive months in a calendar year in a specified position for the presumption to apply. With respect to lower back impairments, this bill would additionally require the member to have worked at least 5 years in a specified position that required the member to wear a duty belt as a condition of employment for the presumption to apply. This bill would authorize the presumption relating to these additional injuries to be rebutted by evidence to the contrary, but unless controverted, the applicable governing board of a public retirement system is required to find in accordance with the presumption. The bill would repeal the provisions related to post-traumatic stress disorder on January 1, 2025.The bill would, contingent upon the enactment of SB 623 of the 2023–24 Regular Session, as specified, repeal the provisions related to post-traumatic stress disorder on January 1, 2032.

CA AB 1027 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
Social media platforms: drug safety policies.
09/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 1027, Petrie-Norris. Social media platforms: drug safety policies. Existing law, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA), as amended by the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020, an initiative measure, grants to a consumer various rights with respect to personal information, as defined, that is collected by a business, as defined. The CCPA requires a business that controls the collection of a consumer’s personal information to inform consumers of the categories of personal information collected, the purposes for which the categories of personal information are collected or used, and the length of time the business intends to retain each category of personal information, as specified.Existing law, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, generally prohibits a government entity from compelling the production of or access to electronic communication information or electronic device information, as defined, without a search warrant, wiretap order, order for electronic reader records, subpoena, or order for a pen register or trap and trace device, except for emergency situations, as specified. The CCPA grants to a consumer various rights with respect to personal information, as defined, that is collected by a business, as defined, including the right to request that a business delete personal information about the consumer that the business has collected from the consumer. The California Privacy Rights Act of 2020, approved by the voters as Proposition 24 at the November 3, 2020, statewide general election, amended, added to, and reenacted the CCPA.Existing law requires a social media company, as defined, to submit reports, as specified, starting no later than January 1, 2024, to the Attorney General, including, but not limited to, the current version of the terms of service for each social media platform owned or operated by the company, specified categories of content and what policies the social media company has for that platform to address that content, and data related to violations of the terms of service for each platform. Existing law requires the Attorney General to make all terms of service reports submitted pursuant to those provisions available to the public in a searchable repository on its official internet website.This bill would add to those categories of content the distribution of controlled substances.Existing law, until January 1, 2028, requires a social media platform to create and post a policy statement regarding the use of the social media platform to illegally distribute controlled substances, including a general description of its policies and procedures for responding to law enforcement inquiries. Existing law exempts from these requirements a business that generated less than $100,000,000 in gross revenue during the preceding calendar year.This bill would delete the above-described exemption and would require the policy statement to include a general description of the social media platform’s policy on the retention of electronic communication information and policies and procedures governing when a platform proactively shares relevant information pertaining to distribution of a controlled substance, as specified. The bill would require a social media platform to retain content it has taken down or removed for a violation of its policy related to controlled substances, as specified, for a period of 90 days, except when the platform has a good faith belief that the content is related to the offering, seeking, or receiving of gender-affirming health care, gender-affirming mental health care, or reproductive health care that is lawful under California law. The bill would specify that it does not alter the rights or obligations established in any other law, including the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and the California Consumer Privacy Act.

CA AB 1028 - Tina McKinnor
Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters.
08/28/2023 - In committee: Referred to suspense file.
AB 1028, as amended, McKinnor. Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters. Existing law requires a health practitioner, as defined, to make a report to law enforcement when they suspect a patient has suffered physical injury that is inflicted by the person’s own act or inflicted by another where the injury is by means of a firearm, or caused by assaultive or abusive conduct, including elder abuse, sexual assault, or torture. A violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor.This bill would, on and after January 1, 2025, remove the requirement that a health practitioner make a report to law enforcement when they suspect a patient has suffered physical injury caused by assaultive or abusive conduct, and instead only require that report if the health practitioner suspects a patient has suffered a wound or physical injury inflicted by the person’s own act or inflicted by another where the injury is by means of a firearm, a wound or physical injury resulting from child abuse, or a wound or physical injury resulting from elder abuse.The bill would, on and after January 1, 2025, instead require a health practitioner who suspects that a patient has suffered physical injury that is caused by domestic violence, as defined, to, among other things, provide brief counseling, education, or other support, and a warm handoff, as defined, or referral to local and national domestic violence or sexual violence advocacy services, as specified. The bill would, on and after January 1, 2025, specify that a health practitioner is not civilly or criminally liable for any report that is made in good faith and in compliance with these provisions.This bill would make other conforming changes.Because a violation of these requirements would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1029 - Gail Pellerin
Advance health care directive form.
09/08/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 171, Statutes of 2023.
AB 1029, Pellerin. Advance health care directive form. Existing law establishes the requirements for executing a written advance health care directive that is legally sufficient to direct health care decisions. Existing law provides a form that an individual may use or modify to create an advance health care directive. The statutory form includes a space to designate an agent to make health care decisions, as well as optional spaces to designate a first alternate agent and 2nd alternate agent. Existing law defines “health care decision,” as specified. Existing law authorizes an individual to provide an “individual health care instruction” as the individual’s authorized written or oral direction regarding a health care decision for the individual.This bill would clarify that a “health care decision” does not include consent by a patient’s agent, conservator, or surrogate to convulsive treatment, psychosurgery, sterilization, or abortion. The bill would confirm that a voluntary standalone psychiatric advance directive, as defined, may still be executed. The bill would clarify in the statutory advance health care directive form that the individual’s agent may not consent to a mental health facility or consent to convulsive treatment, psychosurgery, sterilization, or abortion for the individual.

CA AB 103 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
06/30/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 33, Statutes of 2023.
AB 103, Ting. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years. This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes. The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1039 - Freddie Rodriguez
Sexual activity with detained persons.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1039, as amended, Rodriguez. Sexual activity with detained persons. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor for an employee or officer of a public health facility to engage in sexual activity with a consenting adult who is confined in a health facility. Existing law additionally makes it a misdemeanor for specified individuals, including an employee or officer of a public entity detention facility or an employee with a department, board, or authority under the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, to engage in sexual activity with a consenting adult by rubbing or touching the breasts or sexual organs of another, as specified.This bill would change the definition of sexual activity to also include the touching of the anus, groin, or buttocks. The bill would instead make it a misdemeanor or a felony, punishable in the county jail, for employees or officers of a public health facility or public entity detention facility and employees with a department, board, or authority under the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, to engage in sexual activity with a consenting adult, as specified. Existing law makes it punishable as either a misdemeanor or a felony for specified individuals, including an employee or officer of a public entity detention facility, to engage in sexual activity by engaging in sexual intercourse, sodomy, oral copulation, or sexual penetration, as defined, with a consenting adult who is confined in a detention facility. Existing law makes it punishable as either a misdemeanor or a felony for an employee with a department, board, or authority under the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, as specified, to engage in sexual activity by engaging in sexual intercourse, sodomy, oral copulation, or sexual penetration, as defined, with a consenting adult who is an inmate, ward, or parolee. This bill would additionally make it punishable as either a misdemeanor or a felony, punishable in a state prison, for employees or officers of a public health facility to engage in sexual activity with a consenting adult who is confined in a health facility by engaging in sexual intercourse, sodomy, oral copulation, or sexual penetration, as defined. By expanding the scope of crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law requires a person convicted of a felony violation of the above provisions who is employed by a department, board, or authority within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to be terminated, as specified, and prohibits that person from being eligible to be hired or reinstated by the department.This bill would instead require that a person convicted of any violation of these provisions be terminated and prohibited from being reinstated by the department. The bill would also require that a person convicted of any violation of these provisions who is employed by a public entity detention facility or a public health facility be terminated and made ineligible to be hired or reinstated by any public entity detention facility, as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 104 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 104, as amended, Ting. Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023. The Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 and 2023–24 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1055 - Jasmeet Bains
Alcohol drug counselors.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1055, as amended, Bains. Alcohol drug counselors. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license and regulate adult alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities. Existing law also requires the department to require that an individual providing counseling services within a program be certified by a certifying organization approved by the department.This bill would create, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the Allied Behavioral Health Board within the Department of Consumer Affairs. The bill would require the board to establish regulations and standards for the licensure of alcohol drug counselors, as specified. The bill would authorize the board to collaborate with the Department of Health Care Access and Information regarding behavioral health professions, review sunrise review applications for emerging behavioral health license and certification programs, and refer complaints regarding behavioral health workers to appropriate agencies, as specified. The bill would require an applicant to satisfy certain requirements, including, among other things, possession of a master’s degree in alcohol and drug counseling or a related counseling master’s degree, as specified. The bill would, commencing 18 months after the board commences approving licenses, impose additional requirements on an applicant, including completion of a supervised practicum from an approved educational institution, and documentation that either the applicant is certified by a certifying organization or the applicant has completed 2,000 hours of postgraduate supervised work experience. The bill would impose requirements related to continuing education and discipline of licensees. The bill would prohibit a person from using the title of “Licensed Alcohol Drug Counselor” unless the person has applied for and obtained a license from the board, and would make a violation of that provision punishable by an administrative penalty not to exceed $10,000.The bill would specify that it does not require a person employed or volunteering at an outpatient treatment program or residential treatment facility certified or licensed by the State Department of Health Care Services to be licensed by the board. The bill would require the board to establish fees for licensure, as specified.

CA AB 1057 - Akilah Weber
California Home Visiting Program.
02/01/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1057, Weber. California Home Visiting Program. Existing law establishes the State Department of Public Health, which is responsible for various programs relating to the health and safety of people in the state. Existing law requires the department, to the extent resources are available, to maintain a program of maternal and child health that includes the provision of educational, preventative, diagnostic, and treatment services, including medical care, hospitalization and other institutional care and aftercare, appliances and facilitating services directed toward reducing infant mortality, and improving the health of mothers and children.This bill would establish within the Health and Safety Code the California Home Visiting Program, a voluntary maternal, infant, and early childhood program originally created administratively, under which the State Department of Public Health provides funds to local health departments to support pregnant people and parents with young children who live in communities that face greater risks and barriers to achieving positive maternal and child health outcomes, as provided.

CA AB 1071 - Joshua Hoover
Teen dating violence prevention education: online information and resources.
07/11/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1071, Hoover. Teen dating violence prevention education: online information and resources. Existing law requires each educational institution in the state to have a written policy on sexual harassment and to display that policy in a prominent location, as defined, in the main administrative building or other area of the educational institution’s campus or schoolsite. Existing law requires a copy of that policy, as it pertains to pupils, to be provided as part of any orientation program conducted for new and continuing pupils at the beginning of each quarter, semester, or summer session, as applicable. Existing law requires each schoolsite in a school district, county office of education, or charter school, serving pupils in any of grades 9 to 12, inclusive, to create a poster that notifies pupils of that policy and to prominently and conspicuously display the poster in each bathroom and locker room at the schoolsite, as provided.Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to post, and annually update, on the State Department of Education’s internet website, and provide to each school district, a list of statewide resources, including community-based organizations, that provide support to youth and their families who have been subjected to school-based discrimination, harassment, intimidation, or bullying, including school-based discrimination, harassment, intimidation, or bullying on the basis of religious affiliation, nationality, race, or ethnicity, or perceived religious affiliation, nationality, race, or ethnicity. Existing law requires the department’s internet website to also include a list of statewide resources for youth who have been affected by gangs, gun violence, and psychological trauma caused by violence at home, at school, and in the community.This bill would require the department to make (1) resources on abuse, including sexual, emotional, and physical abuse, and teen dating violence prevention for professional learning purposes, (2) information about local and national hotlines and services for youth experiencing teen dating violence, and (3) other relevant materials for parents, guardians, and other caretakers of pupils, available on its internet website.

CA AB 1078 - Corey A. Jackson
Instructional materials and curriculum: diversity.
09/07/2023 - Urgency clause adopted. Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 1078, as amended, Jackson. Instructional materials and curriculum: diversity. (1) Existing law, the Safe Place to Learn Act, requires the State Department of Education, as part of its regular monitoring and review of a local educational agency, to assess whether the local educational agency has, among other things, adopted a policy that prohibits discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and bullying based on specified protected characteristics.This bill would require that policy to include a statement that the policy applies to all acts of the governing board or body of the local educational agency, the superintendent of the school district, and the county superintendent of schools in enacting policies and procedures that govern the local educational agency. Because this provision would impose an additional requirement on local educational agency officials, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would require the department, no later than July 1, 2025, to develop guidance and public educational materials to ensure that all Californians can access information about educational laws and policies that safeguard the right to an accurate and inclusive curriculum.(2) Existing law requires, as a condition of receipt of specified funds for instructional materials, the governing board of a school district to take specified actions, including holding a public hearing or hearings and making a determination, through a resolution, as to whether each pupil in each school in the school district has sufficient textbooks and instructional materials aligned to specified content standards. Upon a determination that there are insufficient textbooks or instructional materials, existing law requires the governing board to take action, as provided, to ensure that each pupil has sufficient textbooks or instructional materials within 2 months of the beginning of the school year in which the determination is made. If the county superintendent determines that a school does not have sufficient textbooks or instructional materials in accordance with this public hearing process, existing law requires the county superintendent to provide the school district with the opportunity to remedy the deficiency. If the deficiency is not remedied, existing law requires the county superintendent to request the department, with approval by the State Board of Education, to purchase textbooks or instructional materials for the school, as provided.If a governing board of a school district makes the above-described determination, by resolution, that there are insufficient textbooks or instructional materials, this bill would require the governing board to submit a copy of that resolution to the county superintendent of schools no later than 3 business days after the governing board hearing.(3) Existing law requires a school district to use its uniform complaint process to help identify and resolve any deficiencies related to, among other things, instructional materials, and to report summarized data on unresolved complaints to the county superintendent of schools. Existing law requires a complaint under these provisions to be filed with the principal of the school or the principal’s designee. Existing law requires the principal or the designee of the district superintendent to make all reasonable efforts to investigate any problem within their authority and to remedy a valid complaint within a reasonable time period, as specified. Existing law authorizes the complainant to appeal to the Superintendent of Public Instruction and requires the Superintendent to provide a written report to the state board describing the basis for the complaint and, as appropriate, a proposed remedy.This bill would authorize a complaint that more than one pupil does not have sufficient textbooks or instructional materials, as a result of an act or omission by the governing board of a school district, to be filed directly with the Superintendent. The bill would authori

CA AB 1104 - Mia Bonta
Corrections and rehabilitation: sentencing.
09/07/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 1104, as amended, Bonta. Corrections and rehabilitation: sentencing. Under existing law, the Legislature finds and declares that the purpose of sentencing is public safety achieved through punishment, rehabilitation, and restorative justice, and that programs should be available for incarcerated persons, including educational, rehabilitative, and restorative justice programs that are designed to promote behavior change and to prepare all eligible offenders for successful reentry into the community.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations relating to corrections and rehabilitation, including that the deprivation of liberty satisfies the punishment purpose of sentencing. The bill would require the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to facilitate access for community-based programs in order to meaningfully effectuate the principles outlined in the findings and declarations.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1170 of the Penal Code proposed by SB 852 to be operative only if this bill and SB 852 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 1107 - Devon John Mathis
Workers’ compensation: presumptive injuries.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1107, as introduced, Mathis. Workers’ compensation: presumptive injuries. Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in the course of employment. Existing law provides, until January 1, 2025, that, for certain peace officers, including specified correctional officers of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, the term “injury” includes post-traumatic stress that develops or manifests during a period in which the injured person is in the service of the department or unit. Existing law requires the compensation awarded pursuant to this provision to include full hospital, surgical, medical treatment, disability indemnity, and death benefits. This bill would, for injuries occurring on or after January 1, 2024, make that provision applicable to additional members and employees of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, including members of the Office of Correctional Safety or the Office of Internal Affairs.

CA AB 1109 - Ash Kalra
Product sales: sodium nitrite.
09/07/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 55. Noes 0.).
AB 1109, as amended, Connolly. Product sales: sodium nitrite. Existing law prohibits the sale and distribution of certain consumer products that include chemicals such as phthalates, polybrominated diphenyl ether, and perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances. Existing law prohibits the sale of certain products to persons under 21 years of age, such as alcohol and tobacco, among others. Existing law, the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act, requires, beginning July 1, 2024, a business that provides an online service, product, or feature likely to be accessed by children to comply with specified requirements. On or after July 1, 2014, this bill, to be known as Tyler’s Law, would prohibit a person, retailer, or online marketplace from selling sodium nitrite to a person under 18 years of age and sodium nitrite in concentrations greater than 10% to a person 18 years of age or older. The bill would establish a defense to the former prohibition if the purchaser acknowledged before purchase they were at least 18 years of age through an effective system, as specified, and the person, retailer, or online marketplace took all reasonable precautions and exercised due diligence to ensure the product would be sold and delivered to a person at least 18 years of age, or the purchaser acknowledged before purchase they were at least 18 years of age and the person, retailer, or online marketplace complies with the requirements of the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act. The bill would exclude from these provisions the sale of sodium nitrite to a business.

CA AB 1110 - Joaquin Arambula
Public health: adverse childhood experiences.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1110, as amended, Arambula. Public health: adverse childhood experiences. Existing law requires the Office of the Surgeon General to, among other things, raise public awareness and coordinate policies governing scientific screening and treatment for toxic stress and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).This bill would, subject to an appropriation and until January 1, 2027, require the office and the State Department of Health Care Services, while administering the ACEs Aware initiative and in collaboration with subject matter experts, to review available literature on ACEs, as defined, and ancestry or ethnicity-based data disaggregation practices in ACEs screenings, develop guidance for culturally and linguistically competent ACEs screenings through improved data collection methods, post the guidance on the department’s internet website and the ACEs Aware internet website, and make the guidance accessible, as specified. The bill would make legislative findings and declarations.

CA AB 1120 - Jesse Gabriel
Pupil health: mental health screenings.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1120, as amended, Gabriel. Pupil health: mental health screenings. Existing law requires the governing board of a school district to give diligent care to the health and physical development of pupils and authorizes the governing board of a school district to employ properly certified persons for this purpose. Existing law requires a school of a school district or county office of education and a charter school to notify pupils and parents or guardians of pupils no less than twice during the school year on how to initiate access to available pupil mental health services on campus or in the community, or both, as provided.This bill would require a school district, county office of education, state special school, or charter school that serves pupils in grades 6 to 12, inclusive, to, in consultation with school and community stakeholders, school-employed mental health professionals, and behavioral health experts, and before an unspecified school year, adopt a policy on universal mental health screening of pupils for youth behavioral disorders, as defined, in grades 6 to 12, inclusive, as provided. To the extent the bill would impose additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1124 - Evan Low
Department of Managed Health Care: employee assistance programs.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1124, as amended, Low. Department of Managed Health Care: employee assistance programs. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, establishes the Department of Managed Health Care to ensure that health care service plans provide enrollees with access to quality health care services and to protect and promote the interests of enrollees.This bill would require the department to create a report that, among other things, examines and analyzes limitations to employee access to behavioral health for employee assistance programs, as defined, and makes related findings and recommendations. The bill would require the department to issue the report to specified members and committees of the Legislature and to post the report on the department’s public internet website no later than June 30, 2024.

CA AB 1130 - Marc Berman
Substance use disorder.
06/29/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 21, Statutes of 2023.
AB 1130, Berman. Substance use disorder. Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, regulates the distribution and use of controlled substances, as defined. Under the act, the State Department of Health Care Services is responsible for the administration of prevention, treatment, and recovery services for alcohol and drug abuse. Existing law, the Medical Practice Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of physicians and surgeons by the Medical Board of California. Existing law authorizes a physician and surgeon to prescribe, dispense, or administer prescription drugs, including prescription controlled substances, to an addict under their treatment for a purpose other than maintenance on, or detoxification from, prescription drugs or controlled substances and under specified conditions to an addict for purposes of maintenance on, or detoxification from, prescription drugs or controlled substances.This bill would revise and recast these provisions, among others, to delete the reference to an “addict” and instead replace it with the term “a person with substance use disorder,” among other technical nonsubstantive changes.

CA AB 1138 - Anthony J. Portantino Jr.
Postsecondary education: sexual assault and sexual violence prevention: medical examinations transportation services.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1138, Weber. Postsecondary education: sexual assault and sexual violence prevention: medical examinations transportation services. Existing law requires the governing board of each community college district, the Trustees of the California State University, the Regents of the University of California, and the governing boards of independent postsecondary institutions, in order to receive state funds for student financial assistance, to enter into memoranda of understanding, agreements, or collaborative partnerships with existing on-campus and community-based organizations, to the extent feasible, to refer students for assistance or make services available to students, including counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, and legal assistance, and including resources for the accused.As a condition of receiving state funds for student financial assistance, this bill would require the trustees and the regents to ensure, to the extent feasible, that a student who seeks support after experiencing sexual violence receives information about the student’s options and rights to obtain a sexual assault forensic medical examination, as specified, and commencing with the 2025–26 school year, to the extent practicable and necessary, to provide to their students without charge and in a manner that protects student confidentiality, transportation to and from a local Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) or Sexual Abuse Response Team (SART) exam center for a qualified health care provider to administer the sexual assault forensic medical evidence kit, as provided. The bill would require, on or before June 30, 2026, and biennially thereafter, as a condition of receiving state financial assistance funds, the trustees and the regents to submit a report to the Legislature on whether their respective institutions have provided transportation for students to and from a local SAFE or SART exam center for a qualified health care provider to administer the sexual assault forensic medical evidence kit and the manner in which students received the transportation.

CA AB 114 - House Budget Committee
Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill.
08/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 114, as amended, Committee on Budget. Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes a public school financing system that requires state funding for school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to be calculated pursuant to a local control funding formula, as specified. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to annually calculate a county local control funding formula for each county superintendent of schools that includes, among other things, an alternative education grant, as specified. Existing law includes, among other things, a base grant based upon average daily attendance as a component of that alternative education grant.This bill would revise the alternative education grant by, among other things, increasing the base grant component of the alternative education grant, revising the calculation of average daily attendance for purposes of the alternative education grant, as specified, and establishing add-ons of $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a juvenile court school and $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a county community school. The bill would require the Superintendent to allocate $3,000 per unit of average daily attendance for a Student Support and Enrichment Block Grant, as provided. The bill would make these provisions applicable commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year.(2) Existing law, commencing with the 2018–19 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $200,000 and other specified amounts, that are dependent upon the number and size of school districts under its jurisdiction and that are determined to be in need of differentiated assistance, to a county superintendent of school’s local control funding formula allocation, as specified.This bill, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, would increase the above-described add-on by $100,000.(3) Existing law, commencing with the 2015–16 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $2,000,000 to the Los Angeles County Office of Education’s local control funding formula allocation for the purpose of supporting statewide professional development and leadership training for education professionals related to antibias education and the creation of inclusive and equitable schools.This bill would, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, increase that add-on for the Los Angeles County Office of Education by $1,000,000 to instead be $3,000,000.(4) The Early Education Act requires the Superintendent to administer the California state preschool program. The act also requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the Director of Social Services and the executive director of the State Board of Education, to convene a statewide interest holder workgroup to provide recommendations on best practices for increasing access to high-quality universal preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-old children offered through a mixed-delivery model that provides equitable learning experiences across a variety of settings. The act requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the director, to provide a report to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature and the Department of Finance with the recommendations of the workgroup no later than January 15, 2023.This bill would delay the reporting of those recommendations described above to instead be no later than March 31, 2024.(5) Existing law establishes the California Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant Program as a state early learning initiative with the goal of expanding access to classroom-based prekindergarten programs. Existing law appropriates $300,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education in both the 2021–22 fiscal year and the 2022–23 fiscal year for allocation to local educational agencies as base grants, enrollment grants, and supplemental grants, as specified.The bill would authorize the department to allocate or prorate un

CA AB 1145 - Brian K. Maienschein
Workers’ compensation.
01/25/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1145, Maienschein. Workers’ compensation. Under existing law, a person injured in the course of employment is generally entitled to receive workers’ compensation on account of that injury. Existing law, until January 1, 2025, provides that, in the case of certain state and local firefighting personnel and peace officers, the term “injury” includes post-traumatic stress disorder that developed or manifested during a period while the member is in the service of the department or unit, and establishes a disputable presumption in this regard. This bill would provide, only until January 1, 2030, that in the case of certain state nurses, psychiatric technicians, and various medical and social services specialists, the term “injury” also includes post-traumatic stress that develops or manifests itself during a period in which the injured person is in the service of the department or unit. The bill would apply to injuries occurring on or after January 1, 2024. The bill would prohibit compensation from being paid for a claim of injury unless the member has performed services for the department or unit for at least 6 months, unless the injury is caused by a sudden and extraordinary employment condition.

CA AB 1147 - Eduardo Garcia
Disability Equity and Accountability Act of 2023.
09/13/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Menjivar.
AB 1147, as amended, Addis. Disability Equity and Accountability Act of 2023. The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act makes the State Department of Developmental Services responsible for providing various services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and for ensuring the appropriateness and quality of those services and supports. Pursuant to that law, the department contracts with regional centers to provide services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities.This bill would enact the Disability Equity and Accountability Act of 2023, which would make various changes to the act for purposes including providing increased oversight of regional center operations and performance. The bill would require an evaluation of regional center performance by the department, which would be implemented using a common set of performance measures. The bill would require the department to establish standards, consisting of benchmarks above which indicate good performance and minimum benchmarks below which a regional center shall undertake efforts to improve, for these performance measures, as specified, by July 1, 2025. The bill would require the department, in consultation with stakeholders, including consumers and family members, to annually establish, update, and review these benchmarks.Existing law requires the department, in consultation with stakeholders, to identify a valid and reliable quality assurance instrument that assesses consumer and family satisfaction, provision of services in a linguistically and competent manner, and personal outcomes, as specified.This bill would require the department by March 1, 2025, to advise the Legislature describing the extent to which the requirements of this section have been met, including the surveying of all consumers, including those who have not purchased services, and providing specific steps and the schedule by which these requirements will be met.Existing law declares the intent of the Legislature to ensure that the individual program plan (IPP) and provision of services and supports by the regional center system is centered on the individual and the family of the individual with developmental disabilities and takes into account the needs and preferences of the individual and the family, as prescribed. Existing law requires an IPP to be developed for any person who, following intake and assessment, is found to be eligible for regional center services, and requires these plans to be completed within 60 days of the completion of the assessment, as specified.This bill also would declare the intent of the Legislature to ensure that goals in any plan allow for innovation and nontraditional service delivery, as specified. The bill would require the service coordinator, as part of the initial IPP meeting and each review of the IPP, as specified, to provide the consumer or, if appropriate, their parents, legal guardian, conservator, or authorized representative, oral and written information about the Self-Determination Program, as prescribed. The bill would require the regional center service coordinator to provide specified information regarding the program within 5 business days of the consumer expressing interest.The bill would revise the criteria applicable to regional center governing boards with which the state contracts, including with respect to training and ongoing support, and executive director performance standards. The bill would require the department to establish and adopt a grievance procedure for governing board members, as specified. The bill also would, beginning on January 1, 2025, make regional centers subject to requirements of the California Public Records Act. Notwithstanding any other law, the bill would require access to records regarding an applicant for, or recipient of, services to be provided, upon request, to the applicant, recipient, or their authorized representative, as specified, unless expressly prohibited by law.T

CA AB 1148 - Mia Bonta
Child support suspension.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1148, Bonta. Child support suspension. Existing law suspends, by operation of law, a money judgment or order for support of a child for any period exceeding 90 consecutive days in which the person ordered to pay support is incarcerated or involuntarily institutionalized unless the person owing support has the means to pay while incarcerated or involuntarily institutionalized. Under existing law, the obligation resumes on the first day of the first full month after the release of the person owing support in the amount previously ordered.This bill would instead require the child support obligation to resume on the first day of the 10th month after the release of the person from incarceration or involuntary institutionalization for persons who are released on or after January 1, 2024. The bill would authorize the person to whom the support is owed or the local child support agency to seek a court order reinstating child support obligations at the amount determined by a court.

CA AB 1157 - Lori D. Wilson
Rehabilitative and habilitative services: durable medical equipment and services.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1157, as amended, Ortega. Rehabilitative and habilitative services: durable medical equipment and services. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, requires the Department of Managed Health Care to license and regulate health care service plans and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Other existing law requires the Department of Insurance to regulate health insurers. Existing law requires an individual or small group health care service plan contract or health insurance policy issued, amended, or renewed on or after January 1, 2017, to include, at a minimum, coverage for essential health benefits pursuant to the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Under existing law, essential health benefits includes, among other things, rehabilitative and habilitative services. Existing law requires habilitative services and devices to be covered under the same terms and conditions applied to rehabilitative services and devices under the plan contract or policy, and defines habilitative services to mean health care services and devices that help a person keep, learn, or improve skills and functioning for daily living.This bill would specify that coverage of rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices under a health care service plan or health insurance policy includes durable medical equipment, services, and repairs, if the equipment, services, or repairs are prescribed or ordered by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional acting within the scope of their license. The bill would define “durable medical equipment” to mean devices, including replacement devices, that are designed for repeated use, and that are used for the treatment or monitoring of a medical condition or injury in order to help a person to partially or fully acquire, improve, keep, or learn, or minimize the loss of, skills and functioning of daily living. The bill would prohibit coverage of durable medical equipment and services from being subject to financial or treatment limitations, as specified.The bill would require the Secretary of California Health and Human Services to communicate to the federal Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight that the coverage of durable medical equipment is necessary to comply with federal requirements for purposes of being considered essential health benefits not subject to defrayal payments. If the center overrules the state’s determination that the additional coverage subjects the state to defrayal payments, the bill would require the secretary to reevaluate California’s essential health benefits benchmark plan to incorporate the coverage without triggering the defrayal requirement. The bill would require the secretary, no later than one year after the center makes its determination, to submit a report to the Legislature recommending the corresponding changes to the essential health benefits benchmarking process in order for the Legislature to approve submission of a new benchmark plan proposal to the center. Because a violation of the bill’s provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1163 - Sabrina Cervantes
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Disparities Reduction Act.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1163, Luz Rivas. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Disparities Reduction Act. Existing law, The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Disparities Reduction Act, requires prescribed state entities, including the State Department of Health Care Services and the Civil Rights Department, in the course of collecting demographic data directly or by contract as to the ancestry or ethnic origin of Californians, to collect voluntary self-identification information pertaining to sexual orientation and gender identity, except as specified. Existing law prohibits these state entities from reporting demographic data that would permit identification of individuals or would result in statistical unreliability and limits the state entities’ use of the information provided, as specified. Existing law requires the state entities to report to the Legislature specified information related to the data and make the data available to the public, except for personally identifiable information. Existing law deems personally identifiable information confidential and prohibits disclosure of that information.This bill would add intersexuality to the voluntary self-identification information to be collected, would apply these provisions to additional state entities, and would require these state entities to comply with these provisions as early as possible following January 1, 2025, but no later than July 1, 2026.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.

CA AB 1165 - Kevin Michael McCarty
Pupil discipline: racist bullying, harassment, or intimidation: restorative justice practice.
06/29/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 22, Statutes of 2023.
AB 1165, McCarty. Pupil discipline: racist bullying, harassment, or intimidation: restorative justice practice. Existing law prohibits a pupil from being suspended from school or recommended for expulsion unless the superintendent of the school district or principal of the school determines that the pupil has committed any of various specified acts. Existing law requires suspension to only be imposed when other means of correction, including, but not limited to, participation in a restorative justice program, fail to bring about proper conduct, except that the suspension of a pupil for a first offense is authorized if the principal or superintendent of schools determines that the pupil violated one of a certain subset of those enumerated acts or that the pupil’s presence causes a danger to persons.This bill would, for a pupil who has been suspended, or for whom other means of correction have been implemented, for an incident of racist bullying, harassment, or intimidation, encourage local educational agencies to have both the victim and perpetrator engage in a restorative justice practice that is found to suit the needs of both the victim and the perpetrator. The bill would encourage local educational agencies to regularly check on the victim of the racist bullying, harassment, or intimidation to ensure that the victim is not in danger of suffering from long-lasting mental health issues, and would also encourage local educational agencies to require perpetrators to engage in culturally sensitive programs, as provided.

CA AB 117 - House Budget Committee
Higher education trailer bill.
08/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 117, as amended, Committee on Budget. Higher education trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program to provide one-time grants for the construction of student housing or for the acquisition and renovation of commercial properties into student housing for the purpose of providing affordable, low-cost housing options for students enrolled in public postsecondary education in the state. Existing law appropriates $1,434,133,000 for the 2022–23 fiscal year from the General Fund for the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program for purposes of the one-time grants described above.This bill, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, would require specified funding previously allocated, or planned to be allocated, to the University of California, the California State University, and the California Community Colleges for those construction grants to instead be funded by revenue bonds issued by the University of California and the California State University, and local revenue bonds issued by community college districts. The bill would require any General Fund support for those grants provided to the campuses of the University of California, the California State University, and the California Community Colleges to revert to the General Fund. The bill would eliminate the 2022–23 fiscal year General Fund appropriation for the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program.(2) Existing law appropriates $650,000,000 from the General Fund to the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges for transfer to the Learning Recovery Emergency Fund. Existing law requires the chancellor’s office to allocate those funds to community college districts on the basis of actual reported full-time equivalent students, as provided. Existing law authorizes the funds to be expended for certain purposes related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including student supports, reengagement strategies, faculty grants, and professional development opportunities.This bill would authorize the funds in the Learning Recovery Emergency Fund to be used for additional purposes, including scheduled maintenance and special repairs of facilities and efforts to increase student retention rates and enrollment by engaging former community college students who may have withdrawn due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.(3) Existing law, until June 30, 2023, authorizes the University of California to provide a scholarship as established by the university or a campus of the university, derived from nonstate funds received for that purpose, to any of its enrolled students who meet the eligibility requirements for that scholarship.This bill would extend that authorization by 4 years.(4) Existing federal law provides for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known in California as CalFresh, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each county.Existing law requires each campus of the California Community Colleges, no later than July 1, 2022, to establish the position of Basic Needs Coordinator to assist students with on- and off-campus housing, food, mental health, and other basic needs services and resources, among other responsibilities, and to establish a Basic Needs Center where basic needs services, resources, and staff are made available to students, as specified. Existing law requires each community college campus to report certain information to the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges related to basic needs services and resources. Existing law requires the chancellor’s office to annually develop and submit a report to the Governor and the Legislature based on the data and information received from campuses and information on the use of funds made available to implement these provisions.This bill would require each community college campus to report addit

CA AB 118 - House Budget Committee
Budget Act of 2023: health.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 118, Committee on Budget. Budget Act of 2023: health. (1) Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law requires a health care service plan to provide disclosures regarding the benefits, services, and terms of the plan contract, as specified, to provide the public, subscribers, and enrollees with a full and fair disclosure of the provisions of the plan.This bill would require the department to develop standard templates for the disclosure form and evidence of coverage, to include, among other things, standard definitions, benefit descriptions, and any other information that the director determines, consistent with the goals of providing fair disclosures of the provisions of a health care service plan. The bill would require the department to consult with the Department of Insurance and interested stakeholders in developing the standard templates. The bill would require health care service plans, beginning January 1, 2025, to use the standard templates for any disclosure form or evidence of coverage published or distributed, except as specified. Because a willful violation of these requirements is a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would authorize the department to develop standard templates for a schedule of benefits, an explanation of benefits, a cost-sharing summary, or any similar document. The bill would authorize the department to require health care service plans to use the standard templates, except as specified, and would authorize the director to require health care service plans to submit forms the health care service plan created based on the department’s templates for the purpose of compliance review. The bill would additionally specify that the department may implement these provisions by issuing and modifying templates and all-plan letters or similar instructions, without taking regulatory action. The bill would also update cross-references in various provisions.(2) Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy to cover mental health and substance use disorder treatment, including medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by an in-network or out-of-network 988 center or mobile crisis team. Existing law prohibits a health care service plan or insurer from requiring prior authorization for medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by a 988 center or mobile crisis team.This bill would instead specify that mental health and substance use disorder treatment includes behavioral health crisis services that are provided by a 988 center, mobile crisis team or other provider of behavioral health crisis services. The bill would prohibit a health care service plan or health insurer from requiring prior authorization for behavioral health crisis stabilization services and care, but would authorize prior authorization for medically necessary mental health or substance use disorder services following stabilization from a behavioral health crisis addressed by services provided through the 988 system.This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer that is contacted by a 988 center, mobile crisis team, or other provider of behavioral health crisis services to, within 30 minutes of initial contact, either authorize poststabilization care or inform the provider that it will arrange for the prompt transfer of the enrollee’s care to another provider. The bill would require the plan or insurer to reimburse a provider for poststabilization care in specified circumstances, including if the plan or insurer did not respond within 30 minutes to authorize care or arrange for transfer. The bill would require a plan or insurer to prominently display on its internet w

CA AB 1186 - Mia Bonta
Juveniles: restitution.
09/06/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Becker.
AB 1186, as amended, Bonta. Juveniles: restitution. Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court over minors who are between 12 and 17 years of age, inclusive, who have violated a federal, state, or local law or ordinance, as specified, and over minors under 12 years of age who have been alleged to have committed specified crimes. Existing law authorizes a juvenile court to adjudge a person under these circumstances to be a ward of the court. Existing law authorizes a court, upon adjudicating a person to be a ward of the court, to require the minor to pay restitution to the victim or victims.This bill would remove the ability of the court to require the minor to pay monetary restitution to the victim. The bill would authorize the court to instead order the minor to make nonmonetary restitution by participating in a community-based restoration program, performing community service, or participating in an educational, employment, youth development, or mental health program, as specified. The bill would require the court to determine the amount of economic loss suffered as a result of the minor’s conduct and issue a restitution order, which would then be transmitted to the California Victim Compensation Board. The bill would require the California Victim Compensation Board, upon appropriation by the Legislature for these purposes, to compensate the victim for the amount in the order.Existing law, for the purposes of determining victims for compensation from a ward, defines a victim for these purposes as including, among other things, a governmental entity responsible for repairing privately owned property that has been defaced or a corporation, partnership, association, government, or other legal or commercial entity when that entity is a direct victim of the crime.This bill would remove those entities from the definition of victim.The bill would additionally make other conforming changes.

CA AB 1187 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
California Victim Compensation Board: reimbursement for personal or technological safety devices or services.
09/12/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 2 p.m.
AB 1187, Quirk-Silva. California Victim Compensation Board: reimbursement for personal or technological safety devices or services. Existing law generally provides for the compensation of victims and derivative victims of specified types of crimes by the California Victim Compensation Board from the Restitution Fund, which is continuously appropriated to the board. Existing law authorizes the board to grant for pecuniary loss, when the board determines that it will best aid the person seeking compensation, as specified. Existing law authorizes the board to reimburse the amount of outpatient psychiatric, psychological, or other mental health counseling-related expenses incurred by the victim or derivative victim, including peer counseling services provided by a rape crisis center and family psychiatric, psychological, or mental health counseling for the successful treatment of the victim provided to family members of the victim in the presence of the victim, subject to specified criteria.This bill would also authorize the board to reimburse the expense of counseling services provided by a Certified Child Life Specialist, certified by the Association of Child Life Professionals, who provides counseling under the supervision of a licensed provider, subject to the board’s approval, as specified. By expanding the authorizations for use of moneys in the Restitution Fund, a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation.

CA AB 1194 - Wendy Maria Carrillo
California Privacy Rights Act of 2020: exemptions: abortion services.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1194, Wendy Carrillo. California Privacy Rights Act of 2020: exemptions: abortion services. Existing law, the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA), approved by the voters as Proposition 24 at the November 3, 2020, statewide general election, grants a consumer various rights with respect to personal information, as defined, that is collected or sold by a business, as defined, including the right to require the business to delete personal information about the consumer, as specified, unless those obligations restrict a business’s ability to, among other things, comply with federal, state, or local laws or comply with a court order or subpoena to provide information, or cooperate with a government agency request for emergency access to a consumer’s personal information if a natural person is at risk or danger of death or serious physical injury, as provided.This bill would, if the consumer’s personal information contains information related to accessing, procuring, or searching for services regarding contraception, pregnancy care, and perinatal care, including, but not limited to, abortion services, require a business to comply with the obligations imposed by the CPRA unless the personal information is used for specified business purposes, as defined, is only retained in aggregated and deidentified form, and is not sold or shared. The bill would specify that the requirement to comply without regard to the above-described exceptions does not alter the duty to preserve or retain evidence in an ongoing civil proceeding. The bill would further specify that a consumer accessing, procuring, or searching for those services does not constitute a natural person being at risk or danger of death or serious physical injury. The bill would also make nonsubstantive conforming changes.The California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 authorizes the Legislature to amend the act to further the purposes and intent of the act by a majority vote of both houses of the Legislature, as specified.This bill would declare that its provisions further the purposes and intent of the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020.

CA AB 1199 - Blanca E. Rubio
Music therapy.
02/01/2024 - Died at Desk.
AB 1199, as introduced, Blanca Rubio. Music therapy. Existing law prohibits a person who provides music therapy from using the title of “Board Certified Music Therapist” unless the person has completed specified education and clinical training requirements. Existing law defines “music therapy” as the clinical and evidence-based use of music therapy interventions in developmental, rehabilitative, habilitative, medical, mental health, preventive, wellness care, or educational settings to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals within a therapeutic relationship, and specifies activities that music therapy includes.This bill would make a nonsubstantive change to that definition.

CA AB 120 - House Budget Committee
Human services.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 120, Committee on Budget. Human services. (1) Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of community care facilities, including group home facilities, short-term residential therapeutic programs (STRTPs), and adult residential facilities (ARFs), by the State Department of Social Services. Under existing law, the department similarly regulates residential care facilities for the elderly. A violation of provisions relating to these facilities is a misdemeanor. Existing law requires administrators of these facilities, with specified exemptions, to complete a department-approved certification program, uniformly referred to as administrator certification training programs. Under existing law, these programs require a specified minimum number of hours, depending on the facility type, of classroom instruction that provides training on a uniform core of knowledge in specified areas. Existing law also requires administrator certificates to be renewed every 2 years, conditional upon the certificate holder submitting documentation of a specified number of hours of continuing education, based on the facility type. Existing law permits up to one-half of the required continuing education hours to be satisfied through online courses, and the remainder to be completed in a classroom instructional setting, as prescribed.This bill would revise those provisions by deleting the classroom instruction requirement for initial certification and continuing education purposes, and instead would require instruction that is conducive to learning and allows participants to simultaneously interact with each other as well as with the instructor. The bill would authorize up to one-half of continuing education hours to be satisfied through self-paced courses, rather than online courses. The bill would make various conforming changes.Existing law authorizes the department to license as ARFs, subject to specified conditions, adult residential facilities for persons with special health care needs (ARFPSHNs), which provide 24-hour services to up to 5 adults with developmental disabilities who have special health care and intensive support needs, as defined. Existing law requires the department to ensure that an ARFPSHN meets specified administrative requirements, including requirements related to fingerprinting and criminal records.This bill additionally would require an ARFPSHN to meet the administrator certification requirements of an ARF, including, but not limited to, completing a department-approved administrator certification training program requiring a designated minimum number of hours of instruction conducive to learning, in which participants are able to simultaneously interact with each other as well as with the instructor, that provides training on the uniform core of knowledge applicable to ARFs, as specified. The bill would require an applicant for an administrator’s certificate to submit an application for certification to the department and pass an examination, as prescribed.Because a violation of the above-described requirements would be a crime, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.Existing law includes within the definition of a community care facility, full-service adoption agencies and noncustodial adoption agencies, both of which are licensed entities authorized to provide specified adoption services. Under existing law, a facility is deemed to be an unlicensed community care facility and maintained and operated to provide nonmedical care if it is unlicensed, not exempt from licensure, and if it satisfies one of several specified conditions, including, among others, performing any of the functions of an adoption agency or holding itself out as performing any of the functions of an adoption agency, as specified. Existing law prohibits the operation of an unlicensed community care facility in the state and makes a violation of these provisions punishable as a misd

CA AB 1202 - Tom Lackey
Medi-Cal: health care services data: children and pregnant or postpartum persons.
02/12/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1202, Lackey. Medi-Cal: health care services data: children and pregnant or postpartum persons. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services through various health care delivery systems, including managed care pursuant to Medi-Cal managed care plan contracts. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law establishes, until January 1, 2026, certain time or distance and appointment time standards for specified Medi-Cal managed care covered services, consistent with federal regulations relating to network adequacy standards, to ensure that those services are available and accessible to enrollees of Medi-Cal managed care plans in a timely manner, as specified. Existing law sets forth various limits on the number of miles or minutes from the enrollee’s place of residence, depending on the type of service or specialty and, in some cases, on the county.This bill would require the department, no later than January 1, 2025, to prepare and submit a report to the Legislature that includes certain information, including an analysis of the adequacy of each Medi-Cal managed care plan’s network for pediatric primary care, including the number and geographic distribution of providers and the plan’s compliance with the above-described time or distance and appointment time standards.Under the bill, the report would also include data, disaggregated as specified, on the number of children and pregnant or postpartum persons who are Medi-Cal beneficiaries receiving certain health care services during the 2021–22, 2022–23, and 2023–24 fiscal years. The report would also include additional information regarding the department’s efforts to improve access to pediatric preventive care, as specified. The bill would require that the report be made publicly available through its posting on the department’s internet website.The bill would repeal these reporting provisions on January 1, 2029.

CA AB 121 - House Budget Committee
Developmental services.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 121, Committee on Budget. Developmental services. (1) Existing law establishes the State Department of Developmental Services, and vests in the department jurisdiction over various state developmental centers for the provision of care to persons with developmental disabilities. Existing law establishes the State Department of State Hospitals within the California Health and Human Services Agency, and provides the department with jurisdiction over specified facilities for the care and treatment of persons with mental health disorders.Existing law requires that every individual with exceptional needs, as defined, who is eligible be provided with educational instruction, services, or both, at no cost to their parent or guardian or, as appropriate, to them. A free appropriate public education is required to be made available to individuals with exceptional needs in accordance with specified federal regulations adopted pursuant to the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Existing law recognizes that individuals with exceptional needs of mandated schoolage residing in California’s state hospitals and developmental centers are entitled, under specified federal law, to have the same access to educational programs as is provided for individuals with exceptional needs residing in the community, and establishes contracting and funding provisions for that purpose. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Director of Developmental Services, and the Director of State Hospitals to develop written interagency agreements to carry out the provisions relating to educational programs for individuals with exceptional needs residing in those facilities.Existing law requires the transfer of pupils in state hospital school programs whose individualized education programs indicate that a community school program is appropriate to be transferred to schools located in the community. Existing law authorizes waivers to that requirement only when approved by both the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Director of Developmental Services. Existing law requires the State Department of Developmental Services, on the first day of each month, upon submission of an invoice by the county superintendent of schools, to pay to the county superintendent of schools 8% of the amount projected to cover the cost of hospital pupils educated in community school programs, as specified. Existing law requires the county superintendent of schools to calculate the actual cost of educating those pupils and, if the actual cost is more or less than the projected amount, requires the following year’s distribution to be adjusted accordingly.This bill would authorize waivers described above to be approved by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and either the State Department of Developmental Services, for individuals receiving developmental disability services, or the State Department of State Hospitals, for individuals receiving mental health services, as specified. The bill would require the State Department of State Hospitals, rather than the State Department of Developmental Services, to make payments to county superintendents of schools with respect to pupils under the State Department of State Hospital’s jurisdiction who are being educated in community school programs. The bill additionally would revise those payment provisions to require the relevant department to pay the entire amount invoiced by the county superintendent of schools, and would require an adjustment to the county’s distribution to be adjusted in the following year only if the actual cost is greater than the amount invoiced by the county superintendent of schools. The bill would update existing references to state hospitals to also refer to developmental centers, and would make various other technical changes, and delete obsolete provisions.(2) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (act), requires the State Departmen

CA AB 1223 - Josh Hoover
Medi-Cal: audit of PACE organizations.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1223, as amended, Hoover. Medi-Cal: audit of PACE organizations. Existing federal law establishes the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), which provides specified services for older individuals at a PACE center so that they may continue living in the community. Federal law authorizes states to implement PACE as a Medicaid state option. Existing state law establishes the California Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE program) to provide community-based, risk-based, and capitated long-term care services as optional services under the state’s Medi-Cal state plan. Existing law authorizes the State Department of Health Care Services to enter into contracts with public or private organizations for implementation of the PACE program and sets out mandatory requirements of the PACE model, as provided under federal law.This bill would require the department to perform program audits of PACE organizations and to develop and maintain standards, rules, and auditing protocols. The bill would require the protocol to include data collection procedures and formal decision rules and procedures for enforcement consequences when the requirements of law are not met.

CA AB 1226 - Matt Haney
Corrections: Placement of incarcerated persons.
07/11/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1226, Haney. Corrections: Placement of incarcerated persons. Existing law requires the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to conduct assessments and examinations of all inmates who are newly committed to a state prison that include investigation of all pertinent circumstances of the person’s life, including, but not limited to, data regarding the inmate’s history of substance abuse, medical and mental health, education, family background, criminal activity, and social functioning.Existing law requires the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to assign a prisoner to the institution of the appropriate security level and gender population nearest the prisoner’s home, unless other classification factors make such a placement unreasonable.This bill, for an incarcerated person with a parent and child relationship with a child under 18 years of age, as specified, or who is a guardian or relative caregiver of a child, as defined, would require the secretary to place the person in the correctional institution or facility that is located nearest to the primary place of residence of the person’s child, provided that the placement would be suitable and appropriate, would facilitate increased contact between the person and their child, and the incarcerated parent gives their consent to the placement. The bill would authorize the department to reevaluate an incarcerated person’s placement to determine whether existing orders should be modified, including whether the person’s child has moved to a place significantly nearer to an otherwise suitable and appropriate institution. The bill would allow an incarcerated person to request a review of their housing assignment when there is a change in the primary place of residence of the person’s child upon which the person’s housing assignment was based.

CA AB 1253 - Brian K. Maienschein
Hearsay: exceptions.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1253, Maienschein. Hearsay: exceptions. Existing law requires the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to refer a person who was convicted of a sexually violent offense and is in prison or whose parole has been revoked for evaluation by the State Department of State Hospitals to determine whether the person is a sexually violent predator before the person’s release from prison. If the State Department of State Hospitals determines that the person is a sexually violent predator, then the Director of State Hospitals must ask the county in which the person was convicted of the offense to file a petition in superior court to involuntarily commit the person to a secure facility for mental health treatment upon the person’s release from prison. Upon filing, if a judge determines that this petition, on its face, contains sufficient facts to constitute probable cause to believe that the person is likely to engage in sexually violent predatory criminal behavior upon their release, the judge must order the person to be detained in a secure facility until a probable cause hearing can be completed. If, at this hearing, the judge determines that there is probable cause, the judge must order that the person remain in custody in a secure facility until a trial is completed, and must order that a trial be conducted to determine whether the person is, by reason of a diagnosed mental disorder, a danger to the health and safety of others in that the person is likely to engage in acts of sexual violence upon the person’s release from prison.Existing law defines hearsay as evidence of a statement that was made other than by a witness while testifying at a hearing and that is offered to prove the truth of the matter stated. Except as provided by law, hearsay evidence is inadmissible. Existing case law, as established in Walker v. Superior Court (2021) 12 Cal.5th 177, provides that there is no indication the Legislature created an explicit hearsay exception to allow hearsay, in the form of police and probation office reports, to be admitted as evidence in the probable cause hearing described above.This bill would provide that within an official written report or record of a law enforcement officer regarding a sexual offense that resulted in a person’s conviction, the following statements are not inadmissible hearsay at the probable cause hearing described above: (1) a statement from a victim of the sexual offense, (2) a statement from an eyewitness to the sexual offense, or (3) a statement from a sexual assault medical examiner who examined a victim of the sexual offense.

CA AB 1254 - Heath Flora
State employees: compensation: firefighters.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1254, as introduced, Flora. State employees: compensation: firefighters. Existing law provides that in order for the state to recruit skilled firefighters for the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, it is the policy of the state to consider prevailing salaries and benefits prior to making salary recommendations. Existing law requires the Department of Human Resources, in order to provide comparability in pay, to take into consideration the salary and benefits of other jurisdictions employing 75 or more full-time firefighters who work in California. This bill would require the state to pay firefighters who are rank-and-file members of State Bargaining Unit 8, employed by the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, within 15% of the average salary for corresponding ranks in 20 listed California fire departments. The bill would require the state and the exclusive representative for State Bargaining Unit 8 to jointly survey annually and calculate the estimated average salaries for those fire departments. The bill would provide that when determining compensation for uniformed classifications of the department, it is the policy of the state to consider the salary of corresponding ranks within the comparable jurisdictions listed, as well as other factors, including internal comparisons. The bill would require any salary increase for firefighters under these provisions to be implemented through a memorandum of understanding, in accordance with specified procedures governing collective bargaining agreements. The bill would include related legislative findings.

CA AB 1260 - Joe Patterson
Parole: notice of release date.
01/11/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1260, as amended, Joe Patterson. Parole: notice of release date. Existing law requires prisoners sentenced to imprisonment in the state prison to serve time on parole or postrelease community supervision after their release from prison. Existing law requires the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to release specified information about a person paroled or placed on postrelease community supervision to local law enforcement agencies.When a person is serving a term for a violent felony as defined or child abuse or a sex offense as defined, existing law requires the Board of Parole Hearings to notify the sheriff or chief of police, or both, and the district attorney where the person was convicted and where the person is scheduled to be released at least 60 days prior to the scheduled release date.Existing law requires a facility that confines an inmate prior to being sentenced to award credits based on participation in programming and good behavior. Existing constitutional provisions, enacted by the voters as Proposition 57 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, authorize the department to award credits to prisoners that are earned for good behavior and approved rehabilitative or educational achievements.This bill would require the department to make an initial determination of the minimum eligible parole date for the inmate based on the sentence of the court and any credits awarded or expected to be awarded to the inmate during incarceration. The bill would require the department, if the department awards additional credits, revokes credits, or changes the rate of accrual of good conduct credits and the decision would result in an inmate’s minimum eligible parole date changing more than 6 months, to post the inmate’s new release date on the public inmate locator system.

CA AB 127 - House Budget Committee
State government.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 127, Committee on Budget. State government. (1) Existing law, the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act, among other things, requires a business that provides an online service, product, or feature likely to be accessed by children to comply with specified requirements, including a requirement to configure all default privacy settings offered by the online service, product, or feature to the settings that offer a high level of privacy, unless the business can demonstrate a compelling reason that a different setting is in the best interests of children, and to provide privacy information, terms of service, policies, and community standards concisely, prominently, and using clear language suited to the age of children likely to access that online service, product, or feature.Existing law establishes the California Children’s Data Protection Working Group to deliver a report to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2024, and every 2 years thereafter, regarding best practices for the implementation of these provisions, as specified. Existing law requires the working group to select a chair and a vice chair from among its members and requires the working group to consist of 10 members, as specified.This bill would specify that the working group is within the Office of the Attorney General, and would require the report to, instead, be delivered on or before July 1, 2024, and every 2 years thereafter. The bill would instead require the working group to consist of 9 members, as specified. The bill would permit meetings of the working group to be conducted by means of remote communication, as specified.(2) The California Constitution generally prohibits the total annual appropriations subject to limitation of the state and each local government from exceeding the appropriations limit of the entity of government for the prior fiscal year, adjusted for the change in the cost of living and the change in population, and prescribes procedures for making adjustments to the appropriations limit. The California Constitution defines “appropriations subject to limitation” of the state to mean any authorization to expend during a fiscal year the proceeds of taxes levied by or for the state, exclusive of, among other things, state subventions for the use and operation of local government, except as specified. The California Constitution defines “appropriations subject to limitation” of an entity of local government to mean any authorization to expend during a fiscal year the proceeds of taxes levied by or for that entity and the proceeds of state subventions to that entity, except as specified, exclusive of refunds of taxes.Existing statutory provisions implementing these constitutional provisions establish the procedure for establishing the appropriations limit of the state and of each local jurisdiction for each fiscal year. Under existing law, revenues and appropriations for a local jurisdiction include subventions and with respect to the state, revenues and appropriations exclude those subventions. Existing law defines, for those purposes, “state subventions” as only including money received by a local agency from the state, the use of which is unrestricted by the statute providing the subvention.For fiscal years commencing with the 2020–21 fiscal year, existing law defines “state subventions” to additionally include money provided to a local agency pursuant to certain state programs and requires any money received by a local agency pursuant to that provision to be included within the appropriations limit of the local agency, up to the full appropriations limit of the local agency, as prescribed.This bill would require the Department of Finance to, no later than February 1 of each year, calculate the individual subvention amounts for each of those state programs and provide this information on an annual basis to the California State Association of Counties and the League of California Cities for distribution to local agencies. The bi

CA AB 1274 - Damon Connolly
California Youth Empowerment Commission: civil service workforce.
01/25/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 1274, as amended, Connolly. California Youth Empowerment Commission: civil service workforce. Existing law establishes various social services and programs to address the needs of young people in this state, including the California Youth Empowerment Commission in the Office of Planning and Research. The commission consists of 13 voting commissioners between 14 and 25 years of age and 5 nonvoting members. Existing law charges the advisory commission with making recommendations to the Legislature, Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Governor on issues that affect youth, including career preparation, civic engagement, and employment.This bill would add to the list of topics upon which the commission may offer its advice and recommendations fostering a new generation of young Californians to enter the civil service workforce.

CA AB 1275 - Akilah Faizah Weber
Health information.
09/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on RLS.
AB 1275, as amended,  Weber. Health information. Existing law establishes the California Health and Human Services Agency, which includes departments charged with the administration of health, social, and other human services. Existing law establishes the Center for Data Insights and Innovation within the California Health and Human Services Agency to ensure the enforcement of state law mandating the confidentiality of medical information. Existing law also establishes the State Department of Health Care Services and requires the department, among other things, to administer the Medi-Cal program.This bill would require the department, in collaboration with the agency, to collect appropriate data and identify indicators for tracking telehealth outcomes associated with impacting individual patient outcomes and overall population health. The bill would require the department to use the data collected to measure health outcomes of populations, as specified. The bill would make a related intent statement.

CA AB 1282 - Josh Lowenthal
Mental health: impacts of social media.
09/11/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Menjivar.
AB 1282, as amended, Lowenthal. Mental health: impacts of social media. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act, an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, and authorizes the commission to take specified actions, including advising the Governor or the Legislature regarding actions the state may take to improve care and services for people with mental illness.This bill would require the commission to report to specified policy committees of the Legislature, on or before July 1, 2025, a statewide strategy to understand, communicate, and mitigate mental health risks associated with the use of social media by children and youth. The bill would require the report to include, among other things, (1) the degree to which individuals negatively impacted by social media are accessing and receiving mental health services and (2) recommendations to strengthen children and youth resiliency strategies and California’s use of mental health services to reduce the negative outcomes that may result from untreated mental illness, as specified. The bill would require the commission to explore, among other things, the persons and populations that use social media and the negative mental health risks associated with social media and artificial intelligence, as defined. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2029.

CA AB 129 - House Budget Committee
Housing.
06/29/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 129, as amended, Committee on Budget. Housing. (1) Existing law establishes the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency for purposes of carrying out state housing policies and programs, and creates in HCD the California Housing Finance Agency.This bill would remove the California Housing Finance Agency from within HCD. This bill would continue the existence of the California Housing Finance Agency in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency.This bill would also make technical, conforming changes and would delete obsolete references.(2) Existing federal law authorizes the United States Secretary of Agriculture to extend financial assistance through multifamily housing direct loan and grant programs to serve very low, low-, and moderate-income households, including, among other programs, Section 515 Rural Rental Housing Loans, which are mortgages to provide affordable rental housing for very low, low-, and moderate-income families, elderly persons, and persons with disabilities.Existing law establishes a low-income housing tax credit program pursuant to which the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee provides procedures and requirements for the allocation, in modified conformity with federal law, of state insurance, personal income, and corporation tax credit amounts to qualified low-income housing projects that have been allocated, or qualify for, a federal low-income housing tax credit and farmworker housing. Existing law requires not less than 20% of the low-income housing tax credits available annually to be set aside for allocation to rural areas. Existing law defines “rural area” for purposes of the low-income housing tax credit program as an area, which, on January 1 of any calendar year, satisfies any number of certain criteria, including being eligible for financing under the Section 515 program, or successor program, of the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development. This bill would expand the above-described criteria relating to Section 515 eligibility to instead include eligibility for financing under a multifamily housing program, as specified, or successor program, of the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development. Existing law also includes in the definition of “rural area” an unincorporated area that adjoins a city having a population of 40,000 or less, provided that the city and its adjoining unincorporated area are not located within a census tract designated as an urbanized area by the United States Census Bureau.This bill would revise the definition of “rural area” to include an unincorporated area that adjoins a city having a population of 40,000 or less, provided that the unincorporated area is not located within a census tract, block group, or block designated as an urban area by the United States Census Bureau in the most recent decennial census. The bill would also include in the definition of “rural area” an unincorporated area that does not adjoin a city, provided that the unincorporated area is not located within a census tract, block group, or block designated as an urban area by the United States Census Bureau in the most recent decennial census.(3) Existing law, the Planning and Zoning Law, requires a city or county to adopt a general plan for land use development within its boundaries that includes, among other things, a housing element. The law requires HCD to determine whether the housing element is in substantial compliance with specified provisions of that law. Existing law requires HCD to designate jurisdictions as prohousing pursuant to emergency regulations adopted by HCD, as prescribed. Existing law awards jurisdictions that are in substantial compliance with specified provisions and that are prohousing additional points or preference in the scoring of applications for specified state programs, including, among others, the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Prog

CA AB 1310 - Tina McKinnor
Sentencing: recall and resentencing.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1310, as amended, McKinnor. Sentencing: recall and resentencing. Existing law generally authorizes a court to, in the furtherance of justice, dismiss an enhancement. Existing law makes a person who personally uses a firearm in the commission of a felony punishable by an additional and consecutive term of imprisonment in the state prison for 3, 4, or 10 years. Existing law makes a person who personally uses a firearm in the commission of specified felonies punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for an additional and consecutive term of 10 years, and makes them punishable by an additional and consecutive term of imprisonment of 20 years if they discharge the firearm. Existing law makes a person who discharges a firearm and causes great bodily injury in the commission of specified felonies punishable by an additional and consecutive term of imprisonment of 25 years to life. Existing law, until January 1, 2018, prohibited courts from striking those firearm enhancements. Existing law on and after January 1, 2022, requires a court to dismiss an enhancement if it is in furtherance of justice to do so, except as specified.This bill would require the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to identify persons in custody, who, on or before January 1, 2018, suffered a conviction of those firearm enhancements. Upon determining the person qualifies for resentencing, the bill would require the trial court to appoint counsel and authorize the court to strike or dismiss an enhancement, as specified. By imposing additional duties on county public defenders, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1314 - Joe Patterson
Gender identity: parental notification.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1314, as amended, Essayli. Gender identity: parental notification. Existing law provides that parents and guardians of children enrolled in public schools have the right, and should have the opportunity, as mutually supportive and respectful partners in the education of their children within the public schools, to be informed by the school, and to participate in the education of their children, as specified to include, among other things, having access to the school records of their child.Existing law authorizes a minor who is 12 years of age or older to consent to mental health treatment or counseling services, notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, if, in the opinion of the attending professional person, the minor is mature enough to participate intelligently in those services, or to outpatient mental health treatment or counseling services if the foregoing is true and the minor would present a danger of serious physical or mental harm to self or to others without the mental health treatment or counseling or residential shelter services, or is the alleged victim of incest or child abuse. Existing law requires the mental health treatment or counseling of a minor authorized by these provisions to include involvement of the minor’s parent or guardian unless, in the opinion of the professional person who is treating or counseling the minor, the involvement would be inappropriate.This bill would, notwithstanding the consent provisions described above, provide that a parent or guardian has the right to be notified in writing within 3 days from the date any teacher, counselor, or employee of the school becomes aware that a pupil is identifying at school as a gender that does not align with the child’s sex on their birth certificate, other official records, or sex assigned at birth, using sex-segregated school programs and activities, including athletic teams and competitions, or using facilities that do not align with the child’s sex on their birth certificate, other official records, or sex assigned at birth. The bill would state legislative intent related to these provisions. By imposing additional duties on public school officials, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1316 - Christopher M. Ward
Emergency services: psychiatric emergency medical conditions.
01/25/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 1316, as amended, Irwin. Emergency services: psychiatric emergency medical conditions. Existing law, the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act, provides for the involuntary commitment and treatment of a person who is a danger to themselves or others or who is gravely disabled, as defined. Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Pursuant to a schedule of covered benefits, existing law requires Medi-Cal coverage for inpatient hospital services, subject to utilization controls, and with respect to fee-for service beneficiaries, coverage for emergency services and care necessary for the treatment of an emergency medical condition and medical care directly related to the emergency medical condition, as specified.Existing law provides for the licensing and regulation of health facilities by the State Department of Public Health and makes a violation of those provisions a crime. Existing law defines “psychiatric emergency medical condition,” for purposes of providing treatment for emergency conditions, as a mental disorder that manifests itself by acute symptoms of sufficient severity that it renders the patient as being either an immediate danger to the patient or to others, or immediately unable to provide for, or utilize, food, shelter, or clothing, due to the mental disorder. Existing law includes various circumstances under which a patient is required to be treated by, or may be transferred to, specified health facilities for treatment that is solely necessary to relieve or eliminate a psychiatric emergency medical condition.This bill would revise the definition of “psychiatric emergency medical condition” to make that definition applicable regardless of whether the patient is voluntary, or is involuntarily detained for evaluation and treatment, under prescribed circumstances. The bill would make conforming changes to provisions requiring facilities to provide that treatment. By expanding the definition of a crime with respect to those facilities, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The bill would require the Medi-Cal program to cover emergency services and care necessary to treat an emergency medical condition, as defined, including all professional physical, mental, and substance use treatment services, including screening examinations necessary to determine the presence or absence of an emergency medical condition and, if an emergency medical condition exists, all services medically necessary to stabilize the beneficiary. The bill would require coverage, including by a Medi-Cal managed care plan, for emergency services necessary to relieve or eliminate a psychiatric emergency medical condition, regardless of duration, or whether the beneficiary is voluntary, or involuntarily detained for evaluation and treatment, including emergency room professional services, as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1321 - Mia Bonta
California Coordinated Neighborhood and Community Services Grant Program.
07/03/2023 - In committee: Referred to APPR suspense file.
AB 1321, as amended, Bonta. California Coordinated Neighborhood and Community Services Grant Program. Existing law requires the Department of Community Services and Development to, among other things, plan and evaluate strategies for overcoming poverty in the state, mobilize resources in support of antipoverty and community services programs, and administer public and private funds designed to support antipoverty programs that are not currently administered by other departments.Existing law establishes the Cradle-to-Career Data System for the purpose of connecting individuals and organizations to trusted information and resources, as a source for actionable data and research on education, economic, and health outcomes for individuals, families, and communities, and to provide for expanded access to tools and services that support the education-to-employment pipeline, as specified.This bill, the It Takes a Village Act of 2023, subject upon an appropriation in the annual Budget Act or another statute for these purposes, would establish the California Coordinated Neighborhood and Community Services Grant Program to be administered by the State Department of Social Services or another department within the California Health and Human Services Agency. The bill would require the department to grant awards on a competitive basis for the 2025–26 through 2027–28 fiscal years to eligible entities that are Promise Neighborhoods, other community-based networks, or multineighborhood regional cradle-to-career networks, as those terms are defined, to either implement a comprehensive, integrated continuum of cradle-to-career solutions at the neighborhood level or support the civic infrastructure and backbone of cradle-to-career networks that support their network partners to accomplish systems change. The bill would define “cradle-to-career” to mean a system of integrated services that begins before birth and leads to appropriate postsecondary success, including academic, occupational, and independent living, that benefits the individual and community as a whole. The bill would require the department, in consultation with the State Department of Education, to develop an application process and would require the department to establish performance standards to measure progress on indicators and results relevant to the evaluation of the grant program. The bill would require grant recipients to contribute matching funds and prepare and submit an annual report to the department, as specified.

CA AB 133 - House Budget Committee
Courts.
08/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 133, as amended, Committee on Budget. Courts. (1) The California Constitution vests the judicial power of the state in the Supreme Court, courts of appeal, and superior courts, and establishes the Judicial Council to, among other things, adopt rules of court and perform functions prescribed by statute. Existing law, the Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law, authorizes and regulates the formation and operation of, among others, nonprofit public benefit corporations.This bill would establish the California Access to Justice Commission, a nonprofit public benefit corporation, and would authorize the commission to receive funding appropriated by the Legislature. The bill would specify the membership of the commission and terms of the members. The bill would specify the purposes for which the commission may receive and use funding including, among others, providing ongoing leadership in efforts to achieve full and equal access to justice for all Californians. The bill would make the commission subject to the Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law and would set the public meeting requirements for the commission.(2) Existing law, the State Bar Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of attorneys by the State Bar of California, a public corporation. Existing law requires an attorney or law firm receiving or disbursing trust funds to establish and maintain an Interest On Lawyers’ Trust Accounts (IOLTA) account in which the attorney or law firm is required to deposit or invest specified client deposits or funds. Existing law requires interest and dividends earned on IOLTA accounts to be paid to the State Bar of California and used for programs providing civil legal services without charge to indigent persons. Existing law requires the State Bar of California to distribute IOLTA funds and specified other funds to qualified legal service projects and qualified support centers, as defined, for the provision of civil legal services without charge to indigent persons in accordance with a specified statutory scheme. Existing law authorizes qualified legal services projects and qualified support centers to use the funds to provide work opportunities with pay and scholarships for disadvantaged law students to help defray their law school expenses, among other purposes.This bill would authorize qualified legal service projects and qualified support centers to also use the funds to provide loan repayment assistance for the purposes of recruiting and retaining attorneys in accordance with a loan repayment assistance program administered by the California Access to Justice Commission. The bill would appropriate $250,000 from the General Fund to the Judicial Council to provide funding to the California Access to Justice Commission to administer a tax advantaged student loan repayment assistance program for service providers employed by qualified legal service projects and support centers, as specified.(3) Existing law establishes the Appellate Court Trust Fund, the proceeds of which shall be used for the purpose of funding the courts of appeal and the Supreme Court. Existing law requires the funds, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to be apportioned by the Judicial Council to the courts of appeal and the Supreme Court taking into consideration all other funds available and the needs of each court in a manner that promotes equal access to the courts, ensures the ability of the courts to carry out their functions, and promotes implementation of statewide policies.This bill would authorize the funds to be apportioned by the Judicial Council to the Supreme Court, courts of appeal, and the Judicial Council, taking into consideration all other funds available to each and the needs of each.(4) Existing law generally requires the superior court, as an employer, to provide employees with the use of a lactation room or other location for employees to express milk in private, including, among other things, a clean and safe place to sit. Ex

CA AB 1339 - Matt Haney
Discrimination: disability: medication-assisted treatment.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1339, as amended, Haney. Discrimination: disability: medication-assisted treatment. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license narcotic treatment programs to use narcotic replacement therapy and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) of addicted persons. Existing law specifies the medications a licensed narcotic treatment program may use for narcotic treatment replacement therapy and MAT by a licensed narcotic treatment program.Existing law prohibits the unlawful denial of full and equal access to the benefits of, or the unlawful discrimination under, any program or activity that is conducted, operated, or administered by the state or by any state agency, that is funded directly by the state, or that receives any financial assistance from the state, for a person on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, mental disability, physical disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, or sexual orientation.This bill would prohibit a state-funded program, as defined, from discriminating against, or denying access to housing or housing services to, individuals because they are currently undergoing MAT or taking authorized medications.This bill would also make legislative findings and declarations.

CA AB 134 - House Budget Committee
Public safety trailer bill.
06/27/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 59. Noes 17.).
AB 134, Committee on Budget. Public safety trailer bill. (1) Existing law, the California Public Records Act, authorizes the inspection and copying of any public record except where specifically prohibited by law. Existing law, with specified exemptions, makes confidential and exempts from disclosure the personnel records of peace officers and custodial records and certain other records maintained by their employing agencies. Existing law provides that this exemption from disclosure does not apply to investigations of these officers or their employing agencies and related proceedings conducted by a grand jury, a district attorney’s office, or the Attorney General’s office.Existing law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to, among other functions, certify the eligibility of those persons appointed as peace officers throughout the state. Existing law establishes the Peace Officer Standards Accountability Division within POST to review investigations conducted by law enforcement agencies and to conduct additional investigations into serious misconduct that may provide grounds for suspension or revocation of a peace officer’s certification.This bill would exempt from the aforementioned confidentiality provisions, investigations of peace officers and custodial officers or their employing agencies and related proceedings conducted by POST. This bill would provide that, until January 1, 2027, specified records in the possession of POST related to these functions are not public records subject to disclosure, although those same records may be subject to disclosure by the agency that employs or previously employed the peace officer.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.(2) Existing law requires the Department of Justice, on a monthly basis, to review the records in the statewide criminal justice databases and identify persons who are eligible for arrest record relief and automatic conviction record relief. Commencing on July 1, 2023, existing law makes arrest record relief available to a person who has been arrested for a felony, including a felony punishable in the state prison, as specified. Commencing on July 1, 2023, existing law makes conviction record relief available for a defendant convicted, on or after January 1, 2005, of a felony for which they did not complete probation without revocation if the defendant appears to have completed all terms of incarceration, probation, mandatory supervision, postrelease community supervision, and parole, and a period of 4 years has elapsed during which the defendant was not convicted of a new felony offense, except as specified.This bill would delay the implementation of these provisions until July 1, 2024. (3) Existing law authorizes the court, in its discretion and in the interest of justice in specified cases, to permit the defendant to withdraw their plea of guilty or nolo contendere and enter a plea of not guilty, or, if the defendant has been convicted after a plea of not guilty, to set aside the verdict of guilty, and to dismiss the accusations or information against the defendant and release the defendant from all penalties and disabilities resulting from the offense for which they have been convicted. Existing law authorizes a person who was under 18 years of age at the time of commission of a misdemeanor to, in specified circumstances, petition the court for an order sealing the record of conviction and other official records in the case. Existing law authorizes the court to require the defendant or petitioner in these circumstances to reimburse the court, city, and county for actual costs of services rendered under these provisions.Thi

CA AB 135 - House Budget Committee
Public safety.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 135, as amended, Committee on Budget. Public safety. (1) Existing law, operative as of January 1, 2024, will, in a case in which the party bearing the burden of proof proffers expert testimony regarding medical causation and the party’s expert is required as a condition of testifying to opine that causation exists to a reasonable medical probability, allow the party not bearing the burden of proof to offer the testimony of a contrary expert only if the expert can testify that a proffered alternative cause exists to a reasonable medical probability or that a matter cannot meet a reasonable degree of probability in the applicable field, as specified.This bill would, operative as of January 1, 2024, specify that the above provision applies only to general civil actions, as defined in the California Rules of Court.(2) Existing law authorizes the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to contract for the establishment and operation of separate community correctional reentry centers, as specified. Existing law authorizes the secretary to entertain proposals for the establishment and operation of community correctional reentry centers from public and private entities and requires that preference be given to community correctional reentry centers located near large population centers.This bill would authorize the department to enter into long-term contracts, not to exceed 10 years, for the transfer of prisoners to, or placement of prisoners in, facilities under contract pursuant to these provisions. The bill would require that the secretary advertise potential contracts under these provisions and would require that priority be given to certain community correctional reentry centers, as specified. The bill would prohibit the department, for contracts entered into on or after October 14, 2023, from contracting for the establishment of community correctional reentry centers located in current or former state prison facilities or on current or former state prison property.(3) Existing law requires the Department of Justice to provide subsequent state or federal arrest or disposition notification to the State Department of Social Services, the Medical Board of California, the Osteopathic Medical Board of California, and other authorized entities to assist in, among other things, fulfilling employment, licensing, or certification duties. Existing law requires an entity, other than a law enforcement agency, as defined, to enter into a contract with the Department of Justice in order to receive notification of subsequent state or federal arrests or dispositions for licensing, employment, or certification purposes.This bill would authorize the department to submit fingerprints to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, where they will be retained for the purpose of being searched against future submissions to the FBI, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to search latent fingerprint images against all retained fingerprint submissions. The bill would also authorize the department to collect fees for federal subsequent notification services and remit the fees to the FBI.Existing law authorizes a human resource agency or an employer to request from the Department of Justice records of all convictions or any arrest pending adjudication involving specified offenses of a person who applies for a license, employment, or volunteer position in which they would have supervisory or disciplinary power over a minor or any person under their care. Existing law requires a request for records to include the applicant’s fingerprints and any other data specified by the department. Existing law requires the department to furnish the information to the requesting employer and to send a copy of the information to the applicant.This bill would establish procedures for the department, human resource agency, and employer to follow when a request is made to the department for the conviction and arrest records described above, in

CA AB 1354 - Albert Y. Muratsuchi
Pupil instruction: Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.
08/29/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:30 a.m.
AB 1354, Mike Fong. Pupil instruction: Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Existing law requires the State Department of Education to incorporate materials relating to civil rights, human rights violations, genocide, slavery, and the Holocaust into publications that provide examples of curriculum resources for teacher use, consistent with the subject frameworks on history and social science and other requirements. Existing law establishes the Instructional Quality Commission and requires the commission to, among other things, recommend curriculum frameworks to the State Board of Education.This bill would require the commission, when the history-social science curriculum framework is next revised, to consider providing for inclusion of, in its recommended history-social science curriculum framework, related evaluation criteria, and accompanying instructional materials, instruction on both (1) the historical, social, economic, and political contributions of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders in the United States and (2) examples of racism, discrimination, and violence perpetrated against Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders in the United States, as provided.

CA AB 1359 - Pilar Schiavo
Paid sick days: health care employees.
09/11/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Stern.
AB 1359, as amended, Schiavo. Paid sick days: health care employees. Existing law, the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014, entitles employees who satisfy specified requirements to sick leave. The act generally entitles an employee who, on or after July 1, 2015, works in California for the same employer for 30 or more days within a year to paid sick leave, subject to various use and accrual limits. The act also authorizes an employer to limit an employee’s use of accrued paid sick days to 24 hours or 3 days in each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period.This bill would grant an employee of a covered health care facility health care worker sick leave, as those terms are defined. The bill would permit accrued leave, and would prescribe for the use and carryover of that leave, including permitting health care worker sick leave to carry over to the following year of employment for those employees, subject to certain conditions. The bill would prohibit a covered health care facility from limiting an employee’s use of health care worker sick leave. The bill would exempt those employees from certain existing limits on the use of accrued paid sick days. The bill would authorize an employee of a covered health care facility to bring a civil action against an employer that violates this provision and would entitle the employee to collect specified legal and equitable relief to remedy a violation.

CA AB 1360 - Kevin Michael McCarty
Hope California: Secured Residential Treatment Pilot Program.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1360, McCarty. Hope California: Secured Residential Treatment Pilot Program. Existing law authorizes a court to grant pretrial diversion to a defendant in specified cases, including when the defendant is suffering from a mental disorder, specified controlled substances crimes, and when the defendant was, or currently is, a member of the United States military.This bill would, until July 1, 2029, authorize the Counties of Sacramento and Yolo to offer secured residential treatment pilot programs, known as Hope California, for individuals suffering from substance use disorders (SUDs) who have been convicted of qualifying drug-motivated felony crimes, as specified. The bill would require the program to meet certain conditions relating to, among other things, a risk, needs, and biopsychosocial assessment, a comprehensive curriculum, a determination by a judge of the length of treatment, data collection, licensing and monitoring of the facility by the State Department of Health Care Services, and reporting to the department and the Legislature.The bill would require the judge to offer the defendant voluntary participation in the pilot programs, as an alternative to a jail or prison sentence otherwise imposed, if the defendant’s crime was caused, in whole or in part, by the defendant’s SUD, the crime was not a sex crime, serious or violent felony, nonviolent drug possession, domestic violence, or driving under the influence, and the judge makes their determination based on the recommendations of the treatment providers, on a finding by the county health and human services agency that the defendant’s participation would be appropriate, and on a specified report prepared with input from interested parties. Under the bill, the defendant would be eligible to receive credits for participation in the program, as specified.The bill would set forth a procedure for the transfer of a participant out of the secured residential treatment program based on the recommendations of the treatment providers or program administrators or based on the participant’s request, as specified.If the participant successfully completes the court-ordered drug treatment, as determined by treatment providers pursuant to the pilot program, the bill would require the court to set aside the conviction and to dismiss the accusation or information against the defendant and would authorize the court to set aside the conviction and to dismiss the accusation or information of any previous drug possession or drug use crimes on the participant’s record.Existing law requires the Department of Justice to maintain state summary criminal history information, as defined, and to furnish this information to various state and local government officers, officials, and other prescribed entities, if needed in the course of their duties. Existing law requires the Department of Justice, as part of the state summary criminal history information, to disseminate every conviction rendered against an applicant unless the conviction falls within an exception.This bill would exempt from dissemination a conviction that has been set aside pursuant to the above provisions.Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services, including mental health and substance use disorder services, pursuant to a schedule of benefits. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law, with certain exceptions based in part on the type and location of the service, provides for the suspension of Medi-Cal benefits to an inmate of a public institution.This bill would, to the extent permitted under federal and state law, make treatment provided to a participant during the program reimbursable under the Medi-Cal program, if the participant is a Medi-Cal beneficiary and the treatment is a covered benefit under the Medi-Cal pr

CA AB 137 - House Budget Committee
Health omnibus trailer bill.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 137, as amended, Committee on Budget. Health omnibus trailer bill. (1) The California Hospice Licensure Act of 1990 requires a person, political subdivision of the state, or other governmental agency to obtain a license from the State Department of Public Health to provide hospice services to an individual who is experiencing the last phase of life due to a terminal disease, as defined, and their family, except as provided. Existing law requires the department, by January 1, 2024, to adopt emergency regulations to implement the recommendations in a specified report of the California State Auditor. Existing law requires the department to maintain the general moratorium on new hospice agency licenses until the department adopts the regulations, but in no event later than March 29, 2024. Existing law requires the moratorium to end on the earlier of 2 years from the date that the California State Auditor publishes a report on hospice agency licensure, or the date the emergency regulations are adopted.This bill would instead require the moratorium to end on the date the emergency regulations are adopted and would extend the deadline by which the department is required to adopt those regulations to January 1, 2025.(2) Under existing law, the Department of Health Care Services is responsible for licensing and certifying alcoholism and drug abuse recovery and treatment programs and facilities, including both residential and nonresidential programs. Existing law requires the department to charge a fee for the licensure or certification of these facilities and to evaluate licensing and certification fees annually, taking into consideration the overall cost of specified residential and outpatient licensing and certification activities of the department, plus a reasonable reserve. Existing law requires the department to submit proposed new fees or fee changes to the Legislature for approval, as specified, and prohibits new fees or fee changes without legislative approval. Existing law establishes the Residential and Outpatient Program Licensing Fund, consisting of fees, fines, and penalties collected from residential and outpatient programs.This bill would require any excess fees remaining in the Residential and Outpatient Program Licensing Fund at the end of each fiscal year to be carried forward and taken into consideration in setting the amount of fees imposed in the immediately subsequent fiscal year. The bill would authorize the department, no sooner than July 1, 2027, to approve a fee increase, up to and including 5 percent on an annual basis, as needed to address the costs of the licensing and certification activities described above. The bill would require the department to submit any proposed new fees or fee increases in excess of 5 percent to the Legislature for approval and would prohibit new fees or fee changes in excess of 5 percent to be implemented without legislative approval. The bill would require the department to develop a process for programs and facilities to apply for a hardship fee waiver and issue a provider bulletin detailing the application process for the hardship fee waiver that includes eligibility requirements for demonstrated need by July 1, 2024.Existing law requires the department to implement the licensing and certification provisions for alcoholism and drug abuse recovery and treatment programs and facilities through the Administrative Procedure Act. Existing law authorizes the department to implement new fees or fee changes by means of provider bulletins or similar action and to supersede the existing licensing and certification fees until the department amends the regulations. Existing law requires the department to notify and consult with interested parties and appropriate stakeholders regarding new fees or fee changes.This bill would remove the requirement that the department implement the licensing and certification provisions described above through the Administrative Procedures Act. The bill w

CA AB 1376 - Juan Carrillo
Emergency medical services: liability limitation.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1376, Juan Carrillo. Emergency medical services: liability limitation. The Emergency Medical Services System and the Prehospital Emergency Medical Care Personnel Act governs local emergency medical services systems. Existing law makes it a crime to violate any of the provisions of the act, and any rules, regulations, or county ordinances adopted pursuant to the act, that govern patient transfers. Existing law provides specified liability limitations to, among others, physicians, nurses, and other authorized individuals who provide assistance in emergency situations.This bill would provide that a private provider of ambulance services, and employees of that provider, when operating in accordance with the standards, regulations, policies, and protocols of local emergency medical services agencies, shall not be criminally or civilly liable for the continued detainment of a person when that detainment is requested by a peace officer, facility staff, or other professionals authorized to detain persons in specified circumstances involving the transport and continued containment of a person who requires mental health evaluation and treatment, as specified. The bill would require a private provider of ambulance services subject to these provisions to provide care according to the policies and procedures established by the local emergency medical services agency, as specified, and the policies of the California Emergency Medical Services Authority. The bill would also prohibit a private provider of ambulance services that provides transportation to a designated facility, as defined, from requiring a person who is voluntarily agreeing to transport to be placed on an involuntary hold as a precondition to that transport. By creating a new crime under the act, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 138 - House Budget Committee
Human services.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 138, as amended, Committee on Budget. Human services. (1) Existing law establishes the State Department of Developmental Services and vests in the department jurisdiction over various state hospitals, referred to as developmental centers, to provide care to persons with developmental disabilities. Existing law requires the department to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law requires a regional center to notify the appropriate regional resource development project when the regional center determines or is informed, as specified, that the community placement of a consumer is at risk of failing and that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is a likelihood or the regional center is notified by a court of a potential admission to an acute crisis home operated by the department.Existing law requires the department to notify the court, in writing, if the regional resource development project determines that a consumer cannot be safely served in an acute crisis home operated by the department, as specified.This bill would require the department, when the regional resource development project determines that a consumer cannot be safely served in an acute crisis home operated by the department, to continue to work jointly with the regional center to identify or develop alternative services and supports and implement the alternative services and supports that are identified or developed.Existing law prohibits the regional resource development project, in consultation with specific parties, from making a determination that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is necessary unless the determination includes a regional center report that details all considered community-based services and supports, including a crisis home and an explanation why the options could not meet the consumer’s needs.The bill would also require the determination that admittance to an acute crisis home is necessary to include consideration of a supported living arrangement, among other options. This bill would prohibit an acute crisis home operated by the department from utilizing specific interventions, including, among other things, prone restraints and seclusion, as defined.(2) Existing law requires the State Department of Developmental Services, no later than April 1, as specified, to submit a detailed plan to the Legislature whenever the department proposes the closure of a state developmental center. Existing law requires the department, in conjunction with the Governor’s proposed 2023–24 budget, to submit to the Legislature an updated version of a specified safety net plan regarding how the department will provide access to crisis services after the closure of a developmental center and how the state will maintain its role in providing residential services to those whom private sector vendors cannot or will not serve. Existing law requires the plan update, among other provisions, to evaluate the progress made to create a safety net, including services or residences intended to facilitate transitions or diversions from institutions for mental disease, the Canyon Springs Community Facility, the secure treatment program at Porterville Developmental Center, prisons or jails, or other restrictive settings.This bill would authorize the establishment of a residential program in the community for adolescents and adults with complex needs, as defined, as part of the safety net plan to provide access to crisis services, as described above. The bill would authorize the development of up to 3 complex needs homes, as defined, with a maximum capacity of 5 beds per home and would prohibit any stay in a complex needs home from exceeding 18 months, except as specified. The bill establishes certain procedures to be followed prior to, and following, a consumer’s admission to a complex needs home due to an acute crisis, as d

CA AB 1386 - Jesse Gabriel
Veterans housing: tenant referrals.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1386, Gabriel. Veterans housing: tenant referrals. Existing law, the Veterans Housing and Homeless Prevention Act of 2014, requires the California Housing Finance Agency, the Department of Housing and Community Development, and the Department of Veterans Affairs (referred to collectively as “the departments”) to establish and implement programs that focus on veterans at risk for homelessness or experiencing temporary or chronic homelessness, as specified. In this regard, existing law requires the departments to establish and implement programs that, among other things, ensure projects combine housing and supportive services. Existing law requires the departments to ensure at least 50% of funds awarded for capital development are used to provide housing to veterans with extremely low incomes, and requires that at least 60% of units funded targeting extremely low income households are supportive housing.This bill would authorize an entity tasked with making referrals of units targeted to extremely low income households to submit a petition to the departments requesting authority to lease the qualified unit to a secondary tenant, as defined, if a qualified entity is unable to locate, match, or otherwise place a qualified tenant in a qualified unit with 60 days of the unit becoming available. The bill would require a qualified unit that is leased to a secondary tenant to be redesignated to an area median income level commensurate with the income level of the secondary tenant and would require the secondary tenant to pay rent commensurate with their household income’s percentage of the area medium income. The bill would, 12 months after a petition is approved, require the next available comparable unit to be rented to a qualified tenant at 30% of the median income. The bill would require a qualified entity tasked with making referrals to these units to make a good faith effort to match a tenant with an extremely low income before submitting a petition, document these good faith efforts, submit this documentation as a part of the petition, and make this documentation available to the housing sponsor and, upon request, to the departments. The bill would prohibit the departments from approving a petition if it would result in changes that may impact the project’s regulatory agreement, as specified.The bill would require the departments to create a standardized form for the submission of petitions described above. The bill would require the departments, upon receipt of a petition, to (1) review the petition and decide if the qualified unit is eligible to accept secondary tenants under all applicable guidelines, rules, and regulations, and (2) provide a written determination approving or denying the petition no later than 30 days after receipt of the petition.Existing law establishes the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee, composed of specified members, and requires that the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee, among other things, allocate specified federal low-income housing tax credits, as provided.This bill, for purposes of supportive housing units that are restricted to extremely low income veterans pursuant to a regulatory agreement with the committee, would authorize an entity tasked with making referrals of those units targeted to extremely low income households to match prospective secondary tenants with incomes at or below 60% of the area median income that are receiving income as a result of service-connected disability benefits if a qualified tenant is unable to be matched to and accept placement in an available unit within 28 days of the unit becoming available. If a secondary tenant is unable to be matched to and accept placement in an available unit within 14 days, the bill would authorize the entity to match a veteran experiencing homelessness with an income at or below 60% of the area median income, regardless of the source of the income, in an available unit. The bill would require a qualified unit tha

CA AB 140 - House Budget Committee
Early childcare and education.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 140, as amended, Committee on Budget. Early childcare and education. Existing law, the Child Care and Development Services Act, administered by the State Department of Social Services, establishes a system of childcare and development services for children up to 13 years of age. Existing law, the Early Education Act, among other things, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to administer all California state preschool programs, including, but not limited to, part-day and full-day developmentally and age-appropriate programs for 3- and 4-year-old children. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to coordinate with the State Department of Education and others to develop the state plan for purposes of the federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF).Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services, in collaboration with the State Department of Education, to implement a reimbursement system plan that establishes reasonable standards and assigned reimbursement rates. Existing law requires the state and Child Care Providers United - California to establish a Joint Labor Management Committee to develop recommendations for a single reimbursement rate structure that addresses quality standards for equity and accessibility while supporting positive learning and developmental outcomes for children, as specified. Existing law also requires the department, in collaboration with the State Department of Education, to develop and conduct an alternative methodology, as specified, in order to set reimbursement rates for state-subsidized childcare and development services.This bill would, among other things, require the State Department of Social Services to, no later than May 15, 2024, report the status of the draft CCDF state plan to specified budget subcommittees and the Legislative Analyst’s Office on the state’s proposed single rate structure, and to, no later than July 1, 2024, submit the necessary information to support use of a single rate structure utilizing the alternative methodology to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families in the state plan or an amendment to the state plan. The bill would also require the department to provide the same budget subcommittees and the Legislative Analyst’s Office with an outline of implementation components for the approved single rate structure within 60 days of federal approval of the single rate structure utilizing the alternative methodology in the state plan, and would require that single rate structure to apply to specified subsidized childcare and development programs under the department and state preschool programs under the State Department of Education.This bill would require, on or before March 1, 2024, a contractor operating a California state preschool program through a family childcare home education network and each county and contractor that reimburses childcare providers for the provision of state-funded subsidized childcare and development services to develop, implement, and publish a plan for timely payment to providers, as specified. This bill would allocate previously appropriated funds in the Budget Act of 2023 to the State Department of Social Services and State Department of Education to provide specified family childcare providers and childcare centers with a monthly cost of care plus rate commencing January 1, 2024, and through June 30, 2025, inclusive, and a flat-rate, one-time payment, as specified.Existing law previously appropriated funds for the establishment of the Joint Child Care Providers United - State of California Training Partnership Fund and to establish a health care benefits trust administered by Child Care Providers United - California, as specified.This bill would allocate additional funds for those purposes, as specified. The bill would also appropriate $100,0000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Social Services for a one-time cont

CA AB 1406 - Kevin Michael McCarty
Firearms: waiting periods.
09/26/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 244, Statutes of 2023.
AB 1406, McCarty. Firearms: waiting periods. Existing law requires every sale or transfer of a firearm to be processed through a licensed dealer. Existing law requires the dealer to obtain specified information about the purchaser and forward that information to the Department of Justice, as specified. Existing law prohibits a dealer from delivering a firearm within 10 days after the application to purchase, as specified.Existing law requires the department, upon receiving the information about a firearm purchaser, to examine specified records and notify the dealer if the person is prohibited from possessing a firearm or, if specified records are incomplete, to request that the dealer delay delivery of the firearm until that information can be verified.This bill would authorize the department to request a delay of the delivery of a firearm if additional research is required to determine a person’s eligibility, as specified.This bill would additionally authorize the department to request a delay of the delivery of a firearm for up to 30 days if an emergency, as defined, has caused the department to be unable to review records to determine a purchaser’s eligibility to purchase, receive, own, or possess a firearm prior to the conclusion of the waiting period.This bill would, if a firearm being sold or transferred is reported as lost or stolen, require the department to reject the transaction and notify the law enforcement agency that reported the firearm as lost or stolen. The bill would require the dealer to hold the firearm and require that law enforcement agency to retrieve the firearm from the dealer, as specified. By requiring the law enforcement agency to retrieve the firearm, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would also make changes to the notification procedures to purchasers regarding rejected or delayed background checks, as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 141 - House Budget Committee
Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 141, as amended, Committee on Budget. Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. (1) The Early Education Act, among other things, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to administer all California state preschool programs, including, but not limited to, part-day and full-day age and developmentally appropriate programs for 3- and 4-year-old children. The act requires, from July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2023, inclusive, at least 5% of funded enrollment to be reserved for children with exceptional needs, requires at least 7.5% of funded enrollment to be reserved for children with exceptional needs commencing July 1, 2025, to June 30, 2026, inclusive, and requires at least 10% of funded enrollment to be reserved for children with exceptional needs commencing July 1, 2026. On and after July 1, 2026, existing law provides that any agency that does not meet those requirements may be put on a conditional contract, as provided.This bill would reestablish the 5% requirement until June 30, 2025, and make any agency that does not meet that requirement eligible to be placed on a conditional contract as of July 1, 2026. For any agency that does not meet the 7.5% or 10% requirements, the bill would delay their eligibility to be placed on a conditional contract to July 1, 2027, and July 1, 2028, respectively.The act requires each state preschool program applicant or contracting agency to give priority for enrollment for part-day and full-day programs according to a specified priority ranking. Existing law requires the 3rd priority for services to be given to eligible 3- and 4-year old children who are not enrolled in a state-funded transitional kindergarten program. Within this priority, the act provides that if 2 or more families have the same income ranking according to the most recent schedule of income ceiling eligibility table, a child from a family in which the primary home language is a language other than English shall be enrolled first.This bill would revise the latter priority criteria to be based on whether those children are identified as dual language learners instead of whether they are from a family in which the primary home language is a language other than English.(2) Existing law establishes the California Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant Program as a state early learning initiative with the goal of expanding access to classroom-based prekindergarten programs. Existing law appropriates $300,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education in both the 2021–22 fiscal year and the 2022–23 fiscal year for allocation to local educational agencies as base grants, enrollment grants, and supplemental grants, as specified. Existing law authorizes the department to allocate or prorate unexpended funds returned by or collected from a grant recipient for grants to local educational agencies for costs associated with the educational expenses of current and future California state preschool program, transitional kindergarten, and kindergarten professionals that support their attainment of required credentials, permits, or professional development in early childhood instruction or child development, including developing competencies in serving inclusive classrooms and dual language learners, as provided.This bill would extend the encumbrance period for those funds, as specified, thereby making an appropriation. The bill would require any remaining unexpended funds to revert to the General Fund on June 30, 2028.(3) Existing law creates the Learning Recovery Emergency Fund in the State Treasury for the purpose of receiving appropriations for school districts, county offices of education, charter schools, and community college districts related to the state of emergency declared by the Governor on March 4, 2020, relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. Former law initially appropriated $7,936,000,000 from the General Fund to the department for transfer to the Learning Recovery Emergency

CA AB 1412 - Michael A. Gipson
Pretrial diversion: borderline personality disorder.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 66. Noes 3.).
AB 1412, as amended, Hart. Pretrial diversion: borderline personality disorder. Existing law authorizes a court to grant pretrial diversion, for a period no longer than 2 years, to a defendant suffering from a mental disorder, on an accusatory pleading alleging the commission of a misdemeanor or felony offense, in order to allow the defendant to undergo mental health treatment. Existing law conditions eligibility on, among other criteria, a court finding that the defendant suffers from a mental disorder, as specified, excluding antisocal personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, and pedophilia.This bill would remove borderline personality disorder as an exclusion for pretrial diversion.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1001.36 of the Penal Code proposed by AB 455 to be operative only if this bill and AB 455 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 1417 - James D. Wood
Elder and dependent adult abuse: mandated reporting.
09/22/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:30 a.m.
AB 1417, Wood. Elder and dependent adult abuse: mandated reporting. Existing law, the Elder Abuse and Dependent Adult Civil Protection Act, sets forth various provisions for the reporting, investigation, and prosecution of elder and dependent adult abuse. Existing law requires specified people, known as mandated reporters, to report cases of elder or dependent adult abuse. Under existing law, failure to report the abuse is a misdemeanor.Existing law establishes certain procedures for mandated reporters to report known or suspected instances of abuse by telephone followed by a written report, or through a confidential internet reporting tool, as specified. If the abuse is physical abuse, and the abuse occurred in a long-term care facility, with exceptions, existing law sets forth the reporting conditions, including those relating to the format, timelines, and recipients of the reporting. Under existing law, the reporting conditions are based on whether or not the suspected abuse results in serious bodily injury, or whether the suspected abuse is allegedly caused by a resident with a physician’s diagnosis of dementia and there is no serious bodily injury, as specified. If the abuse is not physical abuse, and the abuse occurred in a long-term care facility, with exceptions, existing law requires a telephone report and a written report to be made to the local ombudsperson or the local law enforcement agency.This bill would delete and reorganize some of those reporting provisions. Under the bill, if the abuse that occurred in a long-term facility was allegedly caused by another resident of the facility with dementia diagnosed by a licensed physician and there was no serious bodily injury, the reporter would be required to submit a written report within 24 hours to the long-term care ombudsperson and the local law enforcement agency. Under the bill, in all other instances, immediately or as soon as practically possible, but no longer than 2 hours, the reporter would be required to submit a verbal report to the local law enforcement agency, and to submit a written report within 24 hours to the aforementioned recipients. Under the bill, the time limit for reporting would begin when the mandated reporter observes, obtains knowledge of, or suspects the abuse or neglect. The bill would make conforming changes to related provisions.By expanding the scope of the mandated reporting crime, and to the extent the bill would change the duties of local entities receiving the reports, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 142 - House Budget Committee
Higher education trailer bill.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 142, as amended, Committee on Budget. Higher education trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program to provide one-time grants for the construction of student housing or for the acquisition and renovation of commercial properties into student housing for the purpose of providing affordable, low-cost housing options for students enrolled in public postsecondary education in the state. In addition to funding provided for purposes of the program, existing law requires the University of California and the California Community Colleges to fund construction grants using revenue bonds issued by the University of California or community college districts for specified intersegmental projects. Existing law requires General Fund support for certain grants provided to the California Community Colleges to revert to the General Fund and instead be funded with local revenue bonds issued by community college districts, as specified.This bill would make various changes to these provisions. Among these changes, the bill would (A) authorize instead of request the University of California to fund capital outlay planning and construction grants, (B) increase the amounts specified for 2 existing intersegmental projects, (C) authorize instead of require the California Community Colleges to fund construction grants using local financing issued by community college districts, and (D) delete 2 intersegmental projects between the California Community Colleges and the University of California. The bill would require a community college that has already received an allocation of resources to revert those General Fund resources by June 29, 2024, or upon the enactment of the Budget Act of 2024, whichever is later.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature that no later than the Budget Act of 2024, a statewide lease revenue bond or other statewide financing or fiscal approach be developed and included to support the community college affordable student housing projects that have been approved pursuant to the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program.(2) Existing law establishes the Golden State Teacher Grant Program under the administration of the Student Aid Commission to award grants to students enrolled in professional preparation programs leading to a preliminary teaching credential or a pupil personnel services credential who commit to work for 4 years at a priority school or a California preschool program, as provided. Existing law authorizes the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to determine that a private postsecondary educational institution that offers a professional preparation program approved by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing qualifies for the program if the institution meets certain criteria, including that the institution is accredited by the Senior Colleges and Universities Commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Existing law requires the Student Aid Commission to provide one-time grant funds of up to $10,000 to each enrolled student in a private postsecondary educational institution qualified for the program under these provisions, as specified.This bill would specify that the student be a California resident and that, of the funds appropriated in support of the Golden State Teacher Grant Program, no more than 8% of the total funding may be allocated for purposes of the one-time grants described above. The bill would require that the private postsecondary educational institution be accredited by either the Senior Colleges and Universities Commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges or by an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education. If the institution has no physical presence in California, the bill would require the institution to contract with the Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education to respond to California resident student complaints, as provided.(3) Existing law establishes the California Kids

CA AB 1437 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Medi-Cal: serious mental illness.
01/25/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1437, Irwin. Medi-Cal: serious mental illness. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law sets forth a schedule of benefits under the Medi-Cal program, including specialty and nonspecialty mental health services through different delivery systems, in certain cases subject to utilization controls, such as prior authorization. Under existing law, prior authorization is approval of a specified service in advance of the rendering of that service based upon a determination of medical necessity. Existing law sets forth various provisions relating to processing, or appealing the decision of, treatment authorization requests, and provisions relating to certain services requiring or not requiring a treatment authorization request.After a determination of cost benefit, existing law requires the Director of Health Care Services to modify or eliminate the requirement of prior authorization as a control for treatment, supplies, or equipment that costs less than $100, except for prescribed drugs, as specified.Under this bill, a prescription refill for a drug for serious mental illness would automatically be approved for a period of 365 days after the initial prescription is dispensed.The bill would condition the above-described provisions on the prescription being for a person 18 years of age or over, and on the person not being within the transition jurisdiction of the juvenile court, as specified.

CA AB 1450 - Corey A. Jackson
Behavioral health: behavioral health and wellness screenings: notice.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1450, as amended, Jackson. Behavioral health: behavioral health and wellness screenings: notice. Existing law, the Medical Practice Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of physicians and surgeons by the Medical Board of California. Existing law requires the board, in determining its continuing education requirements, to consider including a course in integrating mental and physical health care in primary care settings, especially as it pertains to early identification of mental health issues and exposure to trauma in children and young adults and their appropriate care and treatment. Existing law requires a physician and surgeon to provide notice to patients at an initial office visit regarding a specified database.Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to license and regulate health facilities, including general acute care hospitals. A violation of those provisions is generally a crime. Existing law requires a general acute care hospital to establish and adopt written policies and procedures to screen patients who are 12 years of age and older for purposes of detecting a risk for suicidal ideation and behavior. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. This bill would require a physician and surgeon, a general acute care hospital, a health care service plan, and a health insurer to provide to each legal guardian of a patient, enrollee, or insured, 10 to 18 years of age, a written or electronic notice regarding the benefits of a behavioral health and wellness screening. The bill would require the providers to provide the notice at least once every 2 years in the preferred method of the legal guardian. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements relative to health care service plans and health facilities would be crimes, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law requires a Medi-Cal managed care plan, no later than January 1, 2025, to conduct annual outreach and education for its enrollees, based on a plan that the Medi-Cal managed care plan develops and submits to the department, as specified, regarding the mental health benefits that are covered by the Medi-Cal managed care plan. This bill would require a Medi-Cal managed care plan to include the above-described notice requirement in their outreach and education plan. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1451 - Corey A. Jackson
Urgent and emergency mental health and substance use disorder treatment.
01/29/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1451, Jackson. Urgent and emergency mental health and substance use disorder treatment. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan or health insurer that provides hospital, medical, or surgical coverage shall provide coverage for medically necessary treatment of mental health and substance use disorders, under the same terms and conditions applied to other medical conditions, as specified. Existing law also includes requirements for timely access to care, including mental health services, including a requirement that a health care service plan or health insurer provide or arrange for the provision of covered health care services in a timely manner appropriate for the nature of the enrollee’s or insured’s condition consistent with good professional practice.This bill would require a health care service plan contract or health insurance policy issued, amended, renewed, or delivered on or after January 1, 2024, to provide coverage for treatment of urgent and emergency mental health and substance use disorders. The bill would require the treatment to be provided without preauthorization, and to be reimbursed in a timely manner, pursuant to specified provisions. The bill’s provisions would only be implemented upon appropriation by the Legislature for administrative costs of the departments. The bill would clarify that it would not relieve a health plan or insurer of existing obligations, as specified. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1470 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Medi-Cal: behavioral health services: documentation standards.
09/13/2023 - In Senate. Held at Desk.
AB 1470, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Medi-Cal: behavioral health services: documentation standards. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services, including behavioral health services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law establishes the California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal (CalAIM) initiative, subject to receipt of any necessary federal approvals and the availability of federal financial participation, in order to, among other things, improve quality outcomes and reduce health disparities.The bill, as part of CalAIM, and with respect to behavioral health services provided under the Medi-Cal program, would require the department to standardize data elements relating to documentation requirements, including, but not limited to, medically necessary criteria, and would require the department to develop standard forms containing information necessary to properly adjudicate claims pursuant to CalAIM Terms and Conditions. The bill would require the department to consult with representatives of specified associations and programs for purposes of implementing these provisions.The bill would require the department to conduct, on or before July 1, 2025, regional trainings for personnel and provider networks of applicable entities, including county mental health plans, Medi-Cal managed care plans, and entities within the fee-for-service delivery system, on proper completion of the standard forms. The bill would require each applicable entity to distribute the training material and standard forms to its provider networks, and to commence, no later than July 1, 2025, using the standard forms. The bill would require providers of applicable entities to use those forms, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to restrict the imposition of additional documentation requirements beyond those included on standard forms, as specified.The bill would require the department to conduct an analysis on the status of utilization of the standard forms by applicable entities, and on the status of the trainings and training material, in order to determine the effectiveness of implementation of the above-described provisions. The bill would require the department to prepare a report containing findings from the analysis no later than July 1, 2026, and a followup report no later than July 1, 2028, and to submit each report to the Legislature and post it on the department’s internet website.

CA AB 1478 - Sabrina Cervantes
Maternal health: community-based comprehensive perinatal care: database of referral networks.
01/25/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1478, Cervantes. Maternal health: community-based comprehensive perinatal care: database of referral networks. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to develop and maintain a statewide comprehensive community-based perinatal services program. Existing law also requires the department to enter into contracts, grants, or agreements with health care providers to deliver these services in a coordinated effort in medically underserved areas or areas with demonstrated need.This bill would require, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the department to develop and maintain on its internet website a database of referral networks of community-based mental health providers and support services addressing, among other topics, postpartum depression and prenatal care, as specified, in the above-described areas. The bill would require the database to include information on mental health providers and support groups that allow patient-driven care access, as specified. The bill would require the department to update the database annually to ensure the database contains up-to-date information.

CA AB 1479 - Eduardo Garcia
Pupil health: social-emotional, behavioral, and mental health supports.
01/25/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1479, Garcia. Pupil health: social-emotional, behavioral, and mental health supports. Existing law requires the governing board of a school district to give diligent care to the health and physical development of pupils and authorizes the governing board of a school district to employ properly certified persons for the work, including school psychologists and counselors.This bill would establish the Pupil Social-Emotional, Behavioral, and Mental Health Program, to be administered by the State Department of Education, to provide eligible local educational agencies with an allocation of moneys to provide Model Tier 1 Support, as defined, accessible to pupils and families. The bill would require all schools within a school district or county office of education, and charter schools that meet certain criteria and have a plan approved by the department to provide evidence-based, Tier 1 social-emotional, behavioral, and mental health support accessible to pupils and families, to be eligible for an apportionment of state funds under the program for those purposes, as provided. The bill would condition the implementation of these provisions upon an appropriation by the Legislature.

CA AB 1487 - Miguel Santiago
Public health: Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Wellness Reentry Fund.
09/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 1487, Santiago. Public health: Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Wellness Reentry Fund. Existing law establishes the Transgender Wellness and Equity Fund, under the administration of the State Department of Public Health’s Office of Health Equity, for the purposes of funding grants to create programs, or funding existing programs, focused on coordinating trans-inclusive health care for individuals who identify as transgender, gender nonconforming, or intersex.This bill would, upon appropriation by the Legislature, create the Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Wellness Reentry Fund for purposes of funding grants to create programs, or funding existing programs, focused on reentry programming specifically to support transgender, gender variant, and intersex people who have experienced carceral systems. The bill would make legislative findings and declarations.

CA AB 1497 - Matt Haney
Criminal procedure.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1497, as amended, Haney. Criminal procedure. (1) Existing law, in a criminal trial, allows evidence of mental disease, mental defect, or mental disorder solely for the issue of whether or not the accused actually formed a required specific intent, premeditated, deliberated, or harbored malice aforethought, when a specific intent crime is charged.This bill would instead allow that evidence for the issue of whether or not the accused actually formed the required mental state for the crime that is charged, including whether or not the accused committed a willful act, premeditated, deliberated, harbored malice aforethought, acted knowingly, acted maliciously, or acted with conscious disregard for human life.(2) Existing law allows a person who was arrested or convicted of a nonviolent offense while they were a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence, to petition the court, under penalty of perjury, for vacatur relief. To receive that relief, existing law requires that the person establish, by clear and convincing evidence, that the arrest or conviction was the direct result of being a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence, which demonstrates that the person lacked the requisite intent to commit the offense. Existing law requires the court, under those circumstances, to find that the person lacked the requisite intent to commit the offense and to vacate the conviction as invalid due to legal defect at the time of the arrest or conviction.This bill would allow that relief for a person arrested or convicted of any offense. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(3) Existing law creates an affirmative defense against a charge of a crime that the person was coerced to commit the offense as a direct result of being a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence at the time of the offense and when the person had reasonable fear of harm. Existing law prohibits this defense from being used with respect to a violent felony, as defined.This bill would allow that defense to be used with respect to a violent felony.(4) If a court issues an order for a person who was arrested or convicted of an offense while they were a victim of intimate partner violence or sexual violence, existing law requires the court to order the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the offense, the Department of Justice, and any law enforcement agency that arrested the petitioner or participated in the arrest of the petitioner to seal their records of the arrest and the court order to seal and destroy the records within 3 years from the date of the arrest, or within one year after the court order is granted, whichever occurs later, and thereafter to destroy their records of the arrest and the court order to seal and destroy those records.This bill would require the court to also order any law enforcement agency that has taken action or maintains records because of the offense, including, but not limited to, departments of probation, rehabilitation, corrections, and parole, to seal and destroy their records. The bill would require the agencies mentioned above to seal their records of arrest and court order to seal and destroy the records within one year from the date of arrest, or within 90 days after the court order is granted, whichever occurs later. The bill would require the agencies to destroy these records within one year of the date of the court order. The bill would also require the Department of Justice to notify the petitioner and the petitioner’s counsel that the department has complied with the order to seal the arrest records by the applicable deadline.(5) Existing law requires the court, when a judgment of imprisonment is imposed and specifies 3 possible terms, to impose the middle term unless there are circumstances in aggravation or mitigation of the crime. Existing law requires t

CA AB 1499 - Rebecca Bauer-Kahan
Social services: Coordination of Care for At-Risk Individuals Grant Program.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1499, as amended, Bauer-Kahan. Social services: Coordination of Care for At-Risk Individuals Grant Program. Existing law establishes the Department of Housing and Community Development in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency and requires the department to administer various housing programs. Existing law requires agencies and departments administering state programs to collaborate with the California Interagency Council on Homelessness to adopt guidelines and regulations that incorporate core components of housing policy, including Housing First.Existing law contains provisions governing the operation and financing of community mental health services for persons with mental health disorders in every county through locally administered and locally controlled community mental health programs. This bill would require, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the Department of Housing and Community Development to establish the Coordination of Care for At-Risk Individuals Grant Program to provide grants to counties currently enrolled in the Data Driver Recovery Project for the innovative identification and intervention of frequent utilizers, as defined, and to aid in providing those individuals with services. This bill would require a grant recipient to meet specified criteria, including an expressed intent in coordinating with fellow counties to share data in order to identify frequent utilizers. The bill would require an applicant to the program to provide a proposal containing specified information, including a viable plan to identify frequent utilizers and performance metrics and goals the applicant seeks to achieve through the program.The bill would require the department to score applicants to the program competitively according to specified criteria. The bill would require a grant recipient to use prearrest diversion when applicable and provide other services to vulnerable individuals to promote anti-recidivism, among others. The bill would require the department to distribute funds allocated to a grant recipient for a term of 3 years, subject to automatic renewal. The bill would also require a grant recipient to then execute contracts with community-based organizations to provide services to frequent utilizers.The bill would require a grant recipient to submit an annual report to the department on specified information, including the types of services provided to frequent utilizers and whether the grant recipient met the performance metrics identified in their application.

CA AB 1503 - Alexander T. Lee
Pupil attendance: excused absences: religious retreats.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1503, Lee. Pupil attendance: excused absences: religious retreats. Existing law, notwithstanding the requirement that each person between 6 and 18 years of age who is not otherwise exempted is subject to compulsory full-time education, requires a pupil to be excused from school for specified types of absences, including, among others, for certain justifiable personal reasons. Existing law includes attendance at a religious retreat among these justifiable personal reasons and prohibits attendance at religious retreats from exceeding 4 hours per semester for purposes of this provision.This bill, for purposes of the above-described provisions, would instead prohibit attendance at religious retreats from exceeding one schoolday per semester. To the extent that this bill would impose additional duties on local educational entities, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 48205 of the Education Code proposed by SB 350 to be operative only if this bill and SB 350 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1506 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Foster youth.
09/11/2023 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1506, Quirk-Silva. Foster youth. Existing law generally provides for the placement of foster youth in various placement settings and governs the provision of child welfare services, which is defined to mean public social services that are directed toward the accomplishment of specified purposes, including protecting and promoting the welfare of all children, preventing the unnecessary separation of children from their families, and restoring to their families children who have been removed.Existing law grants specified rights to all minors and nonminors in foster care, including, among others, the right to receive medical, dental, vision, and mental health services, the right to be informed of these rights in an age and developmentally appropriate manner, and the right to receive a copy of these rights at specified intervals.This bill would expand these rights to include the opportunity for a child to return to their school to collect their belongings when a move or change in placement requires the child to change schools.

CA AB 1509 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Pupil instruction: State Board of Education: exam and course programs.
05/15/2023 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on APPR. Read second time and amended.
AB 1509, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Pupil instruction: State Board of Education: exam and course programs. (1) Existing law appropriates, for the 2021–22 fiscal year, funds from the General Fund to the Superintendent for allocation for the A–G Completion Improvement Grant Program and makes these funds available for expenditure or encumbrance through the 2025–26 fiscal year. Existing law requires grants awarded by that program to be used for activities that directly support pupil access to, and successful completion of, the A–G course requirements, including, but not limited to, paying Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate fees for unduplicated pupils.This bill would authorize the State Board of Education, for purposes of authorized A–G Completion Improvement Grant fund activities, to expressly approve fees for unduplicated pupils for additional exam programs, and would require the state board to begin to develop the approval criteria, as provided. By expanding the purposes for which appropriated funds may be spent, the bill would make an appropriation.(2) Existing law authorizes a school district to evaluate a principal annually for the principal’s first and 2nd year of employment as a new principal and authorizes additional evaluations, as specified. Existing law authorizes the criteria for school principal evaluations to be based upon the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders and to include evidence of, among other things, pupil academic growth. Existing law authorizes pupil academic growth to be evaluated pursuant to local and state academic assessments, including, among others, state standardized assessments and performance assessments.This bill would authorize the state board to expressly authorize additional exams that may be used to measure pupil academic growth for a principal evaluation, and would require the state board to begin to develop the approval criteria, as provided.(3) Existing law authorizes the governing board of a school district to provide access to a comprehensive educational counseling program for all pupils enrolled in the school district. For schools that enroll pupils in grades 6 to 12, inclusive, existing law defines educational counseling to include, among other things, counseling to encourage participation in advanced placement and international baccalaureate programs.This bill would authorize the state board to approve additional exam programs that an educational counseling program is expressly authorized to encourage participation in, and would require the state board to begin to develop the approval criteria, as provided.(4) Existing law requires the governing board of each school district and county board of education to adopt a local control and accountability plan and to update its respective local control and accountability plan before July 1 of each year. Existing law requires a local control and accountability plan to include, among other things, a description of the annual goals to be achieved for each state priority, as specified, for all pupils and certain subgroups of pupils. The state’s delineated priorities include, among others, pupil achievement as measured by, and as applicable, among other things, the percentage of pupils who have passed an advanced placement examination with a score of 3 or higher.This bill would authorize the state board to approve additional examinations, and their respective scores, for purposes of measuring pupil achievement, and would require the state board to begin to develop the approval criteria, as provided. To the extent the state board’s approval of additional examinations and scores would impose additional duties on school districts and county boards of education in regard to local control and accountability plans, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(5) Existing law establishes the Golden State Pathways Program to promote pathways in high-wage, high-skill, high-growth areas, including technology, he

CA AB 1510 - Juan Alanis
Fighting Fentanyl Bond Act of 2024.
07/13/2023 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on GOV. & F. Read second time and amended.
AB 1510, as amended, Jones-Sawyer. Fighting Fentanyl Bond Act of 2024. Existing law sets forth various programs relating to opioid overdose prevention and treatment, including, among others, standing orders for the distribution of an opioid antagonist, a naloxone grant program, and a grant program to reduce fentanyl overdoses and use throughout the state. Existing law prohibits a person from possessing for sale or purchasing for purposes of sale, specified controlled substances, including fentanyl.This bill would enact the Fighting Fentanyl Bond Act of 2024, which, if adopted, would authorize the issuance, pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law, of bonds in the amount of $____, for purposes of financing, among other things, substance use treatment, harm reduction programs, supportive services for students, programs targeting drug trafficking, substance use treatment programs in prisons and juvenile facilities, and recovery housing and transitional housing for previously incarcerated individuals, as specified.The bill would provide for submission of the bond act to the voters at the November 5, 2024, statewide general election in accordance with specified law.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA AB 152 - House Budget Committee
Background checks and fingerprinting: state employment, licensing, and contracting.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 152, as amended, Committee on Budget. Background checks and fingerprinting: state employment, licensing, and contracting. (1) Existing law requires the Department of Justice to maintain state summary criminal history information, as defined, and to furnish this information to various state and local government officers, officials, and other prescribed entities, as specified. Existing law authorizes the Department of Justice to transmit fingerprint images and related information to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining a federal criminal history information check pursuant to a referencing statute. Existing law requires the department to review the information returned from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and to compile and disseminate a response or a fitness determination to the agency or entity identified in the referencing statute.This bill would require the Office of Youth and Community Restoration, the State Department of State Hospitals, the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation, the California Horse Racing Board, the Department of Toxic Substances Control, the Department of Real Estate, the Department of Housing and Community Development, the Department of General Services, the Treasurer’s office, and the Controller’s office to submit to the Department of Justice fingerprint images and related information required by the Department of Justice for specified individuals, including employees, prospective employees, and contractors, as applicable.This bill would also require the State Department of Public Health to require an applicant for a human prescription drug manufacturing license to submit fingerprint images, and related information as required, to the Department of Justice.The bill would require the Department of Justice to provide a state- or federal-level response, as specified.This bill would require the Department of Real Estate and the Department of Housing and Community Development to require certain services contracts, interagency agreements, or public entity agreements to include a provision requiring the contractor to agree to perform criminal background checks on its employees and subcontractors who will have access to specified information.(2) Existing law establishes the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency, headed by the Commissioner of Financial Protection and Innovation. Under existing law, the department has charge of the execution of specified laws relating to various financial institutions and financial services, including banks, trust companies, credit unions, finance lenders, and residential mortgage lenders. Existing law authorizes the commissioner to deliver, or cause to be delivered, to local, state, or federal law enforcement agencies fingerprints taken of specified individuals, including, among others, an applicant for employment with the department.This bill would require the department to require fingerprint images from any department employee, prospective employee or applicant seeking employment within the department, contractor, subcontractor, volunteer, or vendor who may have access to criminal offender record information. The bill would require the Department of Justice to forward a request for national-level criminal offender record information to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and compile and disseminate the information returned, as specified.(3) Existing law requires the Department of FISCal to require fingerprint images and associated information from any employee, prospective employee, contractor, subcontractor, volunteer, vendor, or partner agency employee whose duties include, or would include, having access to confidential or sensitive information or data on the network or computing infrastructure, as provided.This bill would instead require the Department of FISCal to require fingerprint images and associated related information from any department employee, pr

CA AB 1549 - Wendy Maria Carrillo
Medi-Cal: federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics.
05/17/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 1549, as amended, Wendy Carrillo. Medi-Cal: federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services, including federally qualified health center services and rural health clinic services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Under existing law, to the extent that federal financial participation is available, FQHC and RHC services are reimbursed on a per-visit basis, as specified.This bill would, among other things, require that per-visit rate to account for the costs of the FQHC or RHC that are reasonable and related to the provision of covered services, including the specific staffing and care delivery models used by the FQHC and RHC to deliver those services. The bill would also require the rate for any newly qualified health center to include the cost of care coordination services provided by the health center, as specified.

CA AB 1565 - Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer Sr.
California Cannabis Tax Fund: local equity program grants.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1565, as introduced, Jones-Sawyer. California Cannabis Tax Fund: local equity program grants. Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative measure, authorizes a person who obtains a state license under AUMA to engage in commercial adult-use cannabis activity pursuant to that license and applicable local ordinances. The Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), among other things, consolidates the licensure and regulation of commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis activities. MAUCRSA establishes the Department of Cannabis Control within the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency to administer the act. Under existing law, the California Cannabis Equity Act, a local equity program is a program adopted or operated by a local jurisdiction that focuses on inclusion and support of individuals and communities in California’s cannabis industry who are linked to populations or neighborhoods that were negatively or disproportionately impacted by cannabis criminalization, as specified. The act authorizes the department to provide technical assistance to a local equity program that helps local equity applicants or local equity licensees, as defined. Under that act, the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development is required to administer a grant program to assist a local jurisdiction with the development of a local equity program or to assist local equity applicants and local equity licensees through a local equity program, as specified.Existing law establishes the California Cannabis Tax Fund as a continuously appropriated special fund consisting of specified taxes, interest, penalties, and other amounts related to commercial cannabis activity. Each fiscal year, AUMA requires the Controller to make disbursements from the fund pursuant to a specified schedule. Existing law authorizes the Legislature to amend, on and after July 1, 2028, the provisions relating to the disbursement and allocation of moneys in the fund by majority vote to further the purposes of AUMA, as specified.This bill would require, effective July 1, 2028, the Controller to disburse up to $15,000,000, as specified, to the department for the 2028–29 fiscal year and every fiscal year thereafter. The bill would require the department to use the disbursements to support local equity programs in eligible local jurisdictions to assist local equity applicants and licensees gaining entry into, and to successfully operate in, the state’s regulated cannabis marketplace, as specified. By expanding the purposes for which continuously appropriated moneys may be used, the bill would make an appropriation. The bill would declare that its provisions further the purposes and intent of AUMA.

CA AB 1575 - Jacqui V. Irwin
Public postsecondary education: students codes of conduct: advisers.
01/29/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 1575, as amended, Irwin. Public postsecondary education: students codes of conduct: advisers. Existing federal law, known as Title IX, prohibits a person, on the basis of sex, from being excluded from participation in, being denied the benefits of, or being subject to discrimination, which includes sexual harassment, under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. A portion of the Donahoe Higher Education Act, known as the Equity in Higher Education Act, declares, among other things, that it is the policy of the state to afford all persons, regardless of disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other specified basis, including immigration status, equal rights and opportunities in the postsecondary educational institutions of the state. Provisions of the Donahoe Higher Education Act apply to the University of California only to the extent that the Regents of the University of California act, by resolution, to make them applicable.This bill would require, in order to receive state funds for student financial assistance, the governing board of each community college district, the Trustees of the California State University, the Regents of the University of California, and the Board of Governors of the College of the Law, San Francisco, to adopt a policy permitting a student to be represented by an adviser if the student receives a notification of an alleged violation of a public postsecondary educational institution’s student code of conduct, as defined. The bill would require the initial allegation letter that is received by the student to include a clause informing the student of their right to either select an adviser of their choice or to request the public postsecondary educational institution to provide an adviser to the student. The bill would require an adviser selected by the student or provided by the public postsecondary educational institution to be trained by the institution on its adjudication procedures for the alleged violation. The bill would also require an adviser, with written permission from the student, to receive updates along with the student during the adjudication process and to participate in the process as an advocate for the student or in the role of adviser as authorized by specified state law and Title IX. By imposing new duties on community college districts, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1584 - Akilah Faizah Weber
Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1584, as amended, Weber. Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial. Existing law prohibits a person from being tried or adjudged to punishment while that person is mentally incompetent. Existing law establishes a process by which, if the mental competency of a defendant is in doubt, the defendant’s mental competency is evaluated and the defendant receives treatment with the goal of returning the defendant to competency, as specified. Existing law requires a court to appoint 2 mental health professionals to examine a defendant if the defendant is seeking a finding of mental incompetence.This bill would only require the appointment of a 2nd mental health professional if requested by the defendant. The bill would require the evaluating mental health professional to submit a report to the court within 30 days and would specify the required contents of the report. The bill would also clarify that any statements made by the defendant as part of the evaluation are inadmissible in subsequent proceedings.This bill would authorize the court, if no objection is made to the report, to make a finding of the defendant’s competence based on the report. The bill would, if any party objects to the report, require the court to hold a hearing to determine competence, as specified.Existing law, in the case of a defendant charged with a felony, requires that, upon a finding of mental incompetence, the proceedings be suspended until the defendant regains competence. Existing law prescribes a program of pretrial diversion for defendants with a diagnosed mental disorder whose disorder was a significant factor in the commission of their offense. Under existing law, persons charged with certain offenses, including murder, rape, sexual abuse of a child, and possession of a weapon of mass destruction, are ineligible for diversion.This bill would require the court, upon a finding of mental incompetence of a defendant charged with a felony that is not ineligible for diversion, to determine if it is in the interests of justice to restore the defendant to competence. The bill would require the court, if the restoration of the defendant’s mental competence is not in the interests of justice, to either grant mental health diversion to the defendant or dismiss the charges against the defendant, as specified.If a defendant is returned to court having not been restored to mental competence, this bill would require the defendant to be presumed incompetent and, if the charges are not dismissed, be returned to treatment, as specified.The bill would make other conforming changes.

CA AB 1601 - David Alvarez
Jury duty: eligibility.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1601, as amended, Alvarez. Jury duty: eligibility. Existing law makes all persons eligible and qualified to be prospective trial jurors, except persons who, among other things, are not citizens of the United States.This bill would instead make a person eligible and qualified to be a prospective juror if they are a lawful permanent resident.

CA AB 1616 - Thomas W. Lackey
California Cannabis Tax Fund: Board of State and Community Corrections grants.
06/26/2023 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on PUB S. (Ayes 9. Noes 2.) (June 26). Re-referred to Com. on PUB S.
AB 1616, as introduced, Lackey. California Cannabis Tax Fund: Board of State and Community Corrections grants. Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative measure, authorizes a person who obtains a state license under AUMA to engage in commercial adult-use cannabis activity pursuant to that license and applicable local ordinances. The Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), among other things, consolidates the licensure and regulation of commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis activities. Existing law establishes the California Cannabis Tax Fund as a continuously appropriated fund consisting of specified taxes, interest, penalties, and other amounts related to commercial cannabis activity. Each fiscal year, AUMA requires the Controller to make specified disbursements from the fund, including amounts to the Board of State and Community Corrections for making grants to local governments to assist with law enforcement, fire protection, and other local programs addressing public health and safety associated with the implementation of AUMA. AUMA prohibits the board from making grants to local governments that ban both indoor and outdoor commercial cannabis cultivation, or ban retail sale of cannabis or cannabis products.This bill would require the Board of State and Community Corrections to prioritize local governments whose programs seek to address the unlawful cultivation and sale of cannabis. The bill would also authorize the board to make grants to local governments that ban both indoor and outdoor commercial cannabis cultivation, or ban retail sale of cannabis or cannabis products.AUMA authorizes the Legislature to amend its provisions with a 2/3 vote of both houses to further its purposes and intent, except as specified.This bill would declare that its provisions further the purposes and intent of AUMA.

CA AB 1624 - Dawn Addis
Mental health: patients’ rights programs.
02/01/2024 - Died at Desk.
AB 1624, as introduced, Addis. Mental health: patients’ rights programs. Existing law requires the State Department of State Hospitals and the State Department of Health Care Services to contract with a single nonprofit entity to provide for protection and advocacy services to persons with mental disabilities, as specified.This bill would make a technical, nonsubstantive change to that provision.

CA AB 1634 - Rebecca Bauer-Kahan
Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission.
02/17/2023 - Read first time. To print.
AB 1634, as introduced, Bauer-Kahan. Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act, an initiative statute enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, and requires the commission to adopt regulations for programs and expenditures for innovative programs and prevention and early intervention programs established by the act. Existing law requires regulations adopted by the State Department of Health Care Services to be consistent with the commission’s regulations. Existing law authorizes the commission to provide technical assistance to a county mental health plan, as specified. This bill would make technical, nonsubstantive changes to these provisions.

CA AB 1636 - Miguel Santiago
Mental health services.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1636, as amended, Santiago. Mental health services. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the continuously appropriated Mental Health Services Fund to fund various county mental health programs. The MHSA also established the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission to oversee the administration of various parts of the act. This bill would require the commission to develop, implement, and oversee a public and comprehensive framework for tracking and reporting spending on mental health programs and services from all major fund sources and of program- and service-level and statewide outcome data, as specified. The bill would require counties to report to the commission their expenses in specific categories, including, but not limited to, inpatient care or intensive outpatient services, as well as their unspent funding from all major funding sources. By imposing new reporting requirements on counties, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1644 - Buffy Wicks
Medi-Cal: medically supportive food and nutrition services.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1644, as amended, Bonta. Medi-Cal: medically supportive food and nutrition services. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law requires the department to establish the Medically Tailored Meals Pilot Program and the Short-Term Medically Tailored Meals Intervention Services Program, to operate in specified counties and during limited periods for the purpose of providing medically tailored meal intervention services to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries with certain health conditions, including congestive heart failure, cancer, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or renal disease.Existing law, subject to implementation of the California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal (CalAIM) initiative, authorizes a Medi-Cal managed care plan to elect to cover community supports approved by the department as cost effective and medically appropriate in a comprehensive risk contract that are in lieu of applicable Medi-Cal state plan services. Under existing law, community supports that the department is authorized to approve include, among other things, medically supportive food and nutrition services, including medically tailored meals.This bill would make medically supportive food and nutrition interventions, as defined, a covered benefit under the Medi-Cal program, upon issuance of final guidance by the department. The bill would require medically supportive food and nutrition interventions to be covered when determined to be medically necessary by a health care provider or health care plan, as specified. In order to qualify for coverage under the Medi-Cal program, the bill would require a patient to be offered at least 3 of 6 specified medically supportive food and nutrition interventions and for the interventions to be provided for a minimum duration of 12 weeks, as specified. The bill would only provide coverage for nutrition support interventions when paired with the provision of food through one of the 3 offered interventions. The bill would require a health care provider to match the acuity of a patient’s condition to the intensity and duration of the medically supportive food and nutrition intervention and include culturally appropriate foods whenever possible.The bill would establish a medically supportive food and nutrition benefit advisory workgroup to advise the department in developing final guidance related to eligible populations, the duration and dosage of medically supportive food and nutrition interventions, the ratesetting process, determination of permitted providers, and continuing education for health care providers, as specified. The bill would require the workgroup to include certain stakeholders knowledgeable in medically supportive food and nutrition interventions and stakeholders from Medi-Cal consumer advocacy organizations. The bill would require the workgroup to meet at least quarterly and would require the department to issue final guidance on or before July 1, 2026. The bill would also include findings and declarations of the Legislature relating to the need for medically supportive food and nutrition intervention coverage under the Medi-Cal program.

CA AB 1647 - Esmeralda Soria
Veterans treatment courts: grant program.
06/07/2023 - Referred to Coms. on PUB S. and M. & V.A.
AB 1647, as amended, Soria. Veterans treatment courts: grant program. Existing law establishes a statewide system of courts with a superior court of one or more judges in each county. Existing law authorizes the Judicial Council to prescribe the methods, means, and standards for electronic collection of data related to court administration, practice, and procedure.Existing law requires a criminal court to make a determination as to whether a defendant who was a member of the United States military may be suffering from sexual trauma, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, or mental health problems as a result of the person’s service. Existing law allows the court to consider these circumstances in granting probation, referring the defendant to mental health treatment, and granting restorative relief, as provided. Existing law authorizes a court to grant restorative relief to a veteran defendant who was granted probation and who met specified criteria, including successful participation in court-ordered treatment services to address sexual trauma, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, or mental health problems stemming from military service.This bill, until January 1, 2029, would require that, on appropriation by the Legislature, the Judicial Council operate a grant program to establish and support veterans treatment courts or the equivalent services in counties where veterans treatment courts would be inefficient or impracticable. The bill would require the Judicial Council to establish standards and procedures for the operation of veterans courts, and condition the award of grant funds on adherence to those standards and procedures. The bill would require veterans treatment courts that receive grant funds to report information to the Judicial Council, as specified. The bill would also require the Judicial Council to report information to the Legislature, as specified.

CA AB 1671 - Albert Y. Muratsuchi
Pupil mental health: services.
02/01/2024 - Died at Desk.
AB 1671, as introduced, Muratsuchi. Pupil mental health: services. Existing law requires a school of a school district or county office of education and a charter school to notify pupils and parents or guardians of pupils no less than twice during the school year on how to initiate access to available pupil mental health services on campus or in the community, or both, using at least 2 of specified methods, as provided.This bill would make nonsubstantive changes to those provisions.

CA AB 1674 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Mental health advocacy.
02/01/2024 - Died at Desk.
AB 1674, as introduced, Quirk-Silva. Mental health advocacy. Existing law requires the State Department of State Hospitals and the State Department of Health Care Services to contract with a single nonprofit entity to provide protection and advocacy services to persons with mental disabilities. Under existing law, the contracted entity is responsible for ensuring that mental health laws, regulations, and policies on the rights of recipients of mental health services are observed in state hospitals and in licensed health and community care facilities.This bill would make technical, nonsubstantive changes to these provisions.

CA AB 1676 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Mental health: patients’ rights programs.
02/01/2024 - Died at Desk.
AB 1676, as introduced, Quirk-Silva. Mental health: patients’ rights programs. Existing law requires the State Department of State Hospitals and the State Department of Health Care Services to contract with a single nonprofit entity to provide for protection and advocacy services to persons with mental disabilities, as specified.This bill would make a technical, nonsubstantive change to that provision.

CA AB 1697 - Pilar Schiavo
Uniform Electronic Transactions Act.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1697, Schiavo. Uniform Electronic Transactions Act. Existing law, the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act, provides that a record or signature may not be denied legal effect or enforceability solely because it is in electronic form. The act exempts from its provisions, among other things, specific transactions, including an authorization for the release of medical information by a provider of health care, health care service plan, pharmaceutical company, or contractor and an authorization for the release of genetic test results by a health care service plan under the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act.This bill would delete the exemption for the above-described authorizations under the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act and would make conforming changes.Existing law requires that the authorization for release of medical information contain a specific end date.This bill would, instead, require that the authorization contain an expiration date or event, as defined, and would limit the duration of the authorization to one year or less, except as provided. The bill would also require that the person to whom the medical information pertains receives a copy of the authorization for that authorization to be valid.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 56.05 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 254 to be operative only if this bill and AB 254 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 1701 - Akilah Faizah Weber
Black infant health: California Perinatal Equity Initiative.
09/08/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 174, Statutes of 2023.
AB 1701, Weber. Black infant health: California Perinatal Equity Initiative. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health, subject to an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, to establish the California Perinatal Equity Initiative to expand the scope of interventions provided under the Black Infant Health Program by fostering Community Centers of Excellence and promoting the use of interventions designed to fill gaps in current programming offered through the Black Infant Health Program. Existing law requires the department to develop a process to allocate funds to up to 15 county health departments, to work collaboratively with state and local Black Infant Health programs, for the purpose of improving Black infant birth outcomes and reducing infant mortality. This bill would expand the program to include city health departments, as specified.

CA AB 1707 - Blanca Pacheco
Health professionals and facilities: adverse actions based on another state’s law.
09/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 1707, Pacheco. Health professionals and facilities: adverse actions based on another state’s law. Existing law establishes various boards within the Department of Consumer Affairs to license and regulate various health professionals. Existing law prohibits the Medical Board of California, the Osteopathic Medical Board of California, the Board of Registered Nursing, and the Physician Assistant Board from denying an application for licensure or suspending, revoking, or otherwise imposing discipline upon a licensee because the person was disciplined in another state in which they are licensed solely for performing an abortion in that state or because the person was convicted in another state for an offense related solely to performing an abortion in that state.Existing law provides for the licensure of clinics and health facilities by the Licensing and Certification Division of the State Department of Public Health. Existing law makes a violation of these provisions punishable as a misdemeanor, except as specified.This bill would prohibit a healing arts board under the Department of Consumer Affairs from denying an application for a license or imposing discipline upon a licensee or health care practitioner on the basis of a civil judgment, criminal conviction, or disciplinary action in another state that is based on the application of another state’s law that interferes with a person’s right to receive sensitive services, as defined, that would be lawful in this state, regardless of the patient’s location. The bill would similarly prohibit a health facility from denying staff privileges to, removing from medical staff, or restricting the staff privileges of a licensed health professional on the basis of such a civil judgment, criminal conviction, or disciplinary action imposed by another state. The bill also would also prohibit the denial, suspension, revocation, or limitation of a clinic or health facility license on the basis of those types of civil judgments, criminal convictions, or disciplinary actions imposed by another state. The bill would exempt from the above-specified provisions a civil judgment, criminal conviction, or disciplinary action imposed by another state based upon conduct in another state that would subject an applicant, licensee, or health care practitioner to a similar claim, charge, or action under the laws of this state. By imposing new prohibitions under the provisions related to clinics and health facilities, the violation of which is a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1722 - Megan Dahle
Pupil health: credentialed school nurses, registered nurses, and licensed vocational nurses.
09/22/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:30 a.m.
AB 1722, Megan Dahle. Pupil health: credentialed school nurses, registered nurses, and licensed vocational nurses. (1) Existing law requires the governing board of a school district to give diligent care to the health and physical development of pupils, and authorizes the governing board of a school district to employ properly certified persons for that work. Existing law authorizes a school nurse, if authorized by the governing board of the school district, to perform various pupil health care services. Existing law requires a school nurse to be currently licensed as a registered nurse, as provided, and to have met the minimum requirements for a credential in school nursing, as specified.This bill would require a licensed vocational nurse, as defined, hired pursuant to this bill to be supervised by a credentialed school nurse, as defined, who is employed as a school nurse at the same local educational agency (LEA) or at another LEA. The bill would prohibit interpreting that provision to allow a licensed vocational nurse to go beyond the approved scope of practice pursuant to the Vocational Nursing Practice Act. The bill would require an LEA employing a credentialed school nurse who is supervising a licensed vocational nurse at another LEA, and a credentialed school nurse who is supervising a licensed vocational nurse at another LEA, pursuant to these provisions to have indemnification for the supervisorial liability, as specified. The bill would require certain LEAs to enter into a written agreement containing specified information, including, among other information, a communication policy delineating how the licensed vocational nurse and the credentialed school nurse are to communicate, as provided. The bill would require an LEA to only hire a licensed vocational nurse if a diligent search has been conducted for a suitable credentialed school nurse each school year, as provided. The bill would require a local educational agency to seek approval from its governing board or body before hiring a licensed vocational nurse, including by submitting a declaration to its governing board or body containing certain information. The bill would require a local educational agency electing to hire a licensed vocational nurse to certify to the State Department of Education, upon penalty of perjury, that a diligent recruitment effort to hire a credentialed school nurse was made. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would, if an LEA uses its authority pursuant to the above-mentioned provisions, require the local educational agency to report its use of that authority to the department. The bill would require the department to, on or before January 1, 2028, submit a report to the Legislature containing a list of the LEAs that have used that authority, as provided. The bill would repeal the above-mentioned provisions on January 1, 2029.(2) Existing law requires the governing board of a school district to provide for the adequate testing of the sight and hearing of each pupil enrolled in the schools of the school district to be given only by specified persons, including, among others, certificated employees of the school district or of the county superintendent of schools who possess the qualifications prescribed by the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing.This bill would expand that described authorization to allow those tests to be additionally given by certificated employees, registered nurses, or licensed vocational nurses, under the supervision of a credentialed school nurse, of the school district, charter school, or the county superintendent of schools who possess the qualifications prescribed by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.(3) Existing law requires a school nurse or other authorized person to appraise the vision of a pupil during kindergarten, or upon first enrollment or entry of that pupil in a California school district at an elementary s

CA AB 1723 - Marie Waldron
Crimes: local carceral facility visitation.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1723, as amended, Waldron. Crimes: local carceral facility visitation. Existing law prescribes incarceration in the state prison as punishment for certain crimes. Existing law makes it a felony for a convicted felon who has been previously confined in a state prison to go upon the grounds of or land adjacent to a state or local carceral facility, as specified, without the consent of the warden or other officer in charge of the facility.This bill would require the Board of State and Community Corrections to, on or before January 1, 2025, adopt regulations that establish a uniform process to allow persons convicted of a felony who are employed by an organization that provides rehabilitative programming for or who are associated with an organization that provides mentorship to currently incarcerated individuals to go into a local carceral facility. The bill would provide that evidence of rehabilitation, as defined, is a basis to appeal a denial of entry by the sheriff or other administrator of the facility. By imposing additional duties on local carceral facilities, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1735 - Evan Low
Transit districts: prohibition orders.
07/03/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1735, Low. Transit districts: prohibition orders. Existing law prohibits certain acts by a person with respect to the property, facilities, or vehicles of a transit district. A violation is generally an infraction punishable by a fine not exceeding $75 on a first offense, or on a subsequent offense by a fine not exceeding $250 or by community service.Existing law authorizes the Sacramento Regional Transit District, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Fresno Area Express, and the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District to issue a prohibition order to any person cited for committing one or more of certain prohibited acts in specified transit facilities. Existing law prohibits a person subject to the prohibition order from entering the property, facilities, or vehicles of the transit district for specified periods of time. Existing law establishes notice requirements in that regard and provides for initial and administrative review of the order.This bill would provide that the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority is a transit district for purposes of these provisions regarding prohibition orders.

CA AB 1738 - Wendy Maria Carrillo
Mobile Homeless Connect Pilot Program.
09/12/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Cortese.
AB 1738, as amended, Wendy Carrillo. Mobile Homeless Connect Pilot Program. Existing law requires a fee of $26 to be paid to the Department of Motor Vehicles upon an application for an identification card. Existing law waives that fee for an original or replacement identification card issued to any person who can verify their status as a homeless person or homeless child or youth, and authorizes a homeless services provider with knowledge of the person’s housing status to verify the person’s status for this purpose. Existing law requires a fee of $30 to be paid to the department upon application for an original class C or M driver’s license.This bill, until January 1, 2029, would require the department to establish the Mobile Homeless Connect Pilot Program in specified areas to assist persons experiencing homelessness with obtaining an identification card. The bill would require the department, in collaboration with the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency, to develop guidelines for each pilot project, as specified. The bill would require the department to submit an annual report about the program to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2026, and on or before each January 1 thereafter.

CA AB 1754 - House Judiciary Committee
Maintenance of the codes.
07/25/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 1754, Committee on Judiciary. Maintenance of the codes. Existing law directs the Legislative Counsel to advise the Legislature from time to time as to legislation necessary to maintain the codes.This bill would make nonsubstantive changes in various provisions of the law to effectuate the recommendations made by the Legislative Counsel to the Legislature.

CA AB 1756 - House Judiciary Committee
Committee on Judiciary: judiciary omnibus.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 79. Noes 0.).
AB 1756, as amended, Committee on Judiciary. Committee on Judiciary: judiciary omnibus. (1) Existing law requires the Attorney General to maintain the Registry of Charitable Trusts, a register of charitable corporations, unincorporated associations, and trustees holding property for charitable purposes and fundraisers. Existing law also establishes the Registry of Charitable Trusts Fund in the State Treasury, and directs all registration fees, registration renewal fees, and late fees or other fees paid to the Department of Justice in relation to the Registry of Charitable Trusts be deposited into the fund. This bill would change the name of the Registry of Charitable Trusts to the Registry of Charities and Fundraisers. The bill would also change the name of the Registry of Charitable Trusts Fund to the Registry of Charities and Fundraisers Fund. The bill would also make conforming changes.(2) Existing law governs motor vehicle conditional sale contracts, as defined, and requires sellers of motor vehicles to make certain disclosures to buyers. Existing law authorizes a buyer to pay the entire indebtedness under the contract at any time before maturity without penalty, regardless of any contrary contract provision, as provided. Existing law provides for the determination of the outstanding obligation of the buyer if the indebtedness is satisfied before its maturity through surrender of the motor vehicle, repossession of the motor vehicle, redemption of the motor vehicle after repossession, or any judgment, and requires that the buyer’s outstanding obligation be computed as of the date the holder recovers the value of the motor vehicle through disposition thereof or judgment is entered or as of the date the holder takes possession of the motor vehicle, as applicable.This bill would make a technical change to these provisions relating to the determination of a buyer’s outstanding obligation if the indebtedness is satisfied by surrender of the motor vehicle, repossession of the motor vehicle, redemption of the motor vehicle after repossession, or any judgment.(3) Existing law governs the offer, sale, provision, or administration, in connection with a motor vehicle conditional sale contract, of a guaranteed asset protection waiver (GAP waiver), defined to mean an optional contractual obligation under which a seller agrees, for additional consideration, to cancel or waive all or part of amounts due on the buyer’s conditional sale contract subject to existing law in the event of a total loss or unrecovered theft of the motor vehicle specified in the conditional sale contract. Existing law also governs the termination of a GAP waiver, including the refund of GAP waiver costs on a termination, to be calculated as prescribed. Under existing law, if the termination occurs later than 30 days after the date the buyer purchased the GAP waiver, the buyer is entitled to a refund of the unearned GAP waiver charges, calculated on a pro rata basis according to a prescribed formula that uses figures relating to the period from the GAP waiver termination date to the original full term date of the conditional sale contract and to the original term of the conditional sale contract. A willful violation of these provisions is a crime.This bill, if the original full term of the conditional sale contract exceeded the original full term of the GAP waiver as of the date the buyer purchased the GAP waiver, would require in that case a formula that uses figures relating to the period from the GAP waiver termination date to the original full term date of the GAP waiver and to the original term of the GAP waiver. Because a willful violation of this provision would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (4) Existing law provides that, in a civil action, before filing a demurrer, motion to strike, or motion for judgment on the pleadings, a party is required to meet and confer, in person or by telephone, with the opposing party to try

CA AB 1760 -
Fish and Game Code.
07/25/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 1760, Committee on Water, Parks, and Wildlife. Fish and Game Code. (1) Existing law requires the California Law Revision Commission to study, and limits the commission to studying, topics approved by resolution of the Legislature or by statute. The Legislature has, by resolution, authorized and requested that the commission study whether the Fish and Game Code and related statutory law should be revised to improve its organization, clarify its meaning, resolve inconsistencies, eliminate unnecessary or obsolete provisions, standardize terminology, clarify program authority and funding sources, and make other minor improvements, without making any significant substantive change to the effect of the law.This bill would make technical revisions to provisions of the Fish and Game Code proposed by the commission.(2) Existing law requires that funds deposited in the Big Game Management Account be available for expenditure upon appropriation by the Legislature to the Department of Fish and Wildlife only for certain purposes, including, among other things, to implement programs to benefit wild pigs. This bill, beginning July 1, 2024, would eliminate the authorization to expend those funds to implement programs to benefit wild pigs.

CA AB 1764 - House Housing and Community Development Committee
Housing omnibus.
09/22/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:30 a.m.
AB 1764, Committee on Housing and Community Development. Housing omnibus. (1) Existing law exempts a limited-equity housing cooperative or a workforce housing cooperative trust, as those terms are defined, from certain requirements governing subdivided lands, if the cooperative or trust complies with various conditions, including, among others, if specified federal or state agencies, banks, credit unions, financial institutions, or local government agencies, or a combination thereof, directly finance or subsidize a percentage of the total construction or development cost, as prescribed.This bill would also include a housing authority and a community development commission within the above-described entities, and would make other related and conforming changes to these provisions.(2) Existing law requires a landlord or their agent to provide an applicant requesting to rent a residential property with a receipt for the fee paid by the applicant, which itemizes the out-of-pocket expenses and time spent by the landlord or their agent to obtain and process information about the applicant.This bill would authorize the landlord or their agent and the applicant to agree to have the landlord provide a copy of the receipt for the fee paid by the applicant to an email account provided by the applicant.(3) Existing law, the Davis-Stirling Common Interest Development Act, regulates common interest developments. Existing law provides procedures governing the election of members of the board of directors of common interest development associations. Existing law authorizes an association to impose certain qualification requirements on a nominee for a board seat, including requiring a nominee to have been a member for at least one year, and disqualifying a nominee for a past criminal conviction that would, if the nominee were elected, either prevent the association from purchasing certain required insurance or terminate the association’s existing required insurance coverage, as specified. Under this bill, an association that disqualifies a nominee pursuant to the above-described provisions would be required in its election rules to require a director to comply with the same requirements.Under existing law, if there are not more qualified candidates than vacancies, an association is authorized to consider the candidates elected by acclamation if, among other conditions, the association permits all candidates to run if nominated. However, an association is authorized to disqualify a nominee who has served the maximum number of terms or sequential terms allowed by the association.This bill, instead, would require an association to disqualify that nominee. Under the bill, a director who ceases to be a member of the association would be disqualified from continuing to serve as a director.(4) Existing Law, the Planning and Zoning Law, requires an owner of an assisted housing development, as defined, to give certain advance notice before the anticipated date of the termination of a subsidy contract, the expiration of rental restrictions, or the prepayment on an assisted housing development, to tenants and specified public entities, except as provided. Existing law defines an “assisted housing development” for these purposes to mean a multifamily rental housing development of five or more units that receives governmental assistance under any of specified programs.This bill would include a provision of the federal Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act on housing for persons with disabilities, as well as a rental assistance program of the federal Housing Act of 1949, within those specified programs. The bill would also include grants and loans made by the California Housing Finance Agency for rental housing and would make related changes to those provisions.(5) Existing law, the Affordable Housing and High Road Jobs Act of 2022, until January 1, 2033, establishes a streamlined development process for affordable housing developments that meet

CA AB 1788 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Mental health multidisciplinary personnel team.
04/01/2024 - In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
AB 1788, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Mental health multidisciplinary personnel team. Existing law authorizes a county to establish a homeless adult and family multidisciplinary personnel team, as defined, with the goal of facilitating the expedited identification, assessment, and linkage of homeless individuals to housing and supportive services within that county and to allow provider agencies to share confidential information for the purpose of coordinating housing and supportive services to ensure continuity of care. This bill would authorize counties to also establish mental health multidisciplinary personnel team, as defined, with the goal of facilitating the expedited identification, assessment, and linkage of justice-involved persons diagnosed with a mental illness to supportive services within that county while incarcerated and upon release from county jail and to allow provider agencies and members of the personnel team to share confidential information, as specified, for the purpose of coordinating supportive services to ensure continuity of care. The bill would require the sharing of information permitted under these provisions to be governed by protocols developed in each county, as specified, and would require each county to provide a copy of its protocols to the State Department of Social Services.This bill would authorize the mental health multidisciplinary personnel team to designate qualified persons to be a member of the team for a particular case and would require every member who receives information or records regarding justice-involved persons, as defined, in their capacity as a member of the team to be under the same privacy and confidentiality obligations and subject to the same confidentiality penalties as the person disclosing or providing the information or records. The bill would also require the information or records to be maintained in a manner that ensures the maximum protection of privacy and confidentiality rights.

CA AB 1799 - Corey A. Jackson
Public health: annual state of public health in California.
01/22/2024 - Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 1799, as introduced, Jackson. Public health: annual state of public health in California. Existing law requires the State Public Health Officer, on or before February 1 of every other year, to submit a report to the Governor and Legislature on the state of public health in California. Existing law requires the report to include, among other things, information on health disparities, as specified, and data on the prevalence of morbidity and mortality related to mental illness and substance abuse.This bill would require the State Public Health Officer to include the impact of racism, if any, on the information and data submitted in the written report.

CA AB 1805 - Thomas J. Umberg
Instructional materials: history-social science: Mendez v. Westminster School District of Orange County.
04/02/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1805, as amended, Ta. Instructional materials: history-social science: Mendez v. Westminster School District of Orange County. Existing law requires the State Board of Education to adopt at least 5 basic instructional materials in specified subject areas, including, among others, social science, for use in kindergarten and grades 1 to 8, inclusive, as specified. Existing law establishes the Instructional Quality Commission, as specified, and requires the commission to, among other things, develop criteria for evaluating instructional materials.This bill would require the commission, when the state board adopts new instructional materials for history-social science on or after January 1, 2025, to consider providing for inclusion, in its evaluation criteria, content on the case of Mendez v. Westminster School District of Orange County.

CA AB 1812 - Jesse Gabriel
Budget Act of 2024.
01/16/2024 - Referred to Com. on BUDGET.
AB 1812, as introduced, Gabriel. Budget Act of 2024. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2024–25 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1815 - Akilah Weber
Discrimination: race: hairstyles.
04/02/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 11. Noes 1.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1815, as amended, Weber. Discrimination: race: hairstyles. Existing law, the Unruh Civil Rights Act, provides that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state are entitled to full and equal accommodations in all business establishments regardless of their sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sexual orientation, citizenship, primary language, or immigration status.Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, makes it unlawful to engage in specified discriminatory employment practices based on certain protected characteristics, including race, unless based on a bona fide occupational qualification or applicable security regulations, and prohibits housing discrimination based on specified personal characteristics, including race.Existing law states the policy of the State of California to afford all persons in public schools, regardless of their disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other specified characteristic, equal rights and opportunities in the educational institutions of the state, and to prohibit acts that are contrary to that policy and to provide remedies therefor.Existing law prohibits discrimination because of a perception that a person has one of those protected characteristics or is associated with a person who has, or is perceived to have, any of those characteristics. The California Fair Employment and Housing Act and public school policy define the term race for purposes of those provisions to include traits historically associated with race, including, but not limited to, hair texture and protective hairstyles, as defined.This bill would remove the term “historically” from the definitions of race, thus defining race to include traits associated with race, including, but not limited to, hair texture and protective hairstyles, as defined, and would add those definitions for “race” and “protective hairstyle” to the Unruh Civil Rights Act.

CA AB 1821 - Devon John Mathis
Pupil instruction: course of study: social sciences: treatment of Native Americans.
04/02/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1821, as amended, Ramos. Pupil instruction: course of study: social sciences: treatment of Native Americans. Existing law requires the adopted course of study for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, and the adopted course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to include certain areas of study, including, among others, English, mathematics, social sciences, science, and visual and performing arts, as specified.Existing law requires the Instructional Quality Commission, when the history-social science curriculum framework is next revised, on or after January 1, 2024, to consider providing for inclusion, in that curriculum framework, related evaluation criteria, and accompanying instructional materials, of instruction, among other things, the historical, social, economic, and political contributions of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders in the United States.This bill, with respect to the adopted course of study for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, for social sciences, would additionally require instruction that provides a foundation for understanding the Spanish colonization of California and the Gold Rush Era, including the treatment and perspectives of Native Americans during those periods. The bill, with respect to the adopted course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, for social sciences, would require, to the extent instruction is provided on the Spanish colonization of California or the Gold Rush Era, instruction that provides a foundation for understanding the treatment and perspectives of Native Americans during those periods. The bill would require the commission, when the State Board of Education next revises the history-social science curriculum framework or adopts new instructional materials, on or after January 1, 2025, to consider including content on the treatment and perspectives of Native Americans during those periods in that curriculum framework or evaluation criteria for instructional materials. To the extent that this bill would create new duties for local educational agencies or local officials, it would constitute a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1822 - Damon Connolly
Criminal defendant: mental competency to stand trial.
03/14/2024 - In committee: Set, final hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 1822, as introduced, Connolly. Criminal defendant: mental competency to stand trial. Existing law prohibits a person from being tried or adjudged to punishment while that person is mentally incompetent. Under existing law, a defendant is mentally incompetent if, as a result of mental disorder or developmental disability, they are unable to understand the nature of the criminal proceedings or to assist counsel in the conduct of a defense in a rational manner. If a person is incompetent as a result of a mental health disorder and charged with a misdemeanor or misdemeanors only, existing law authorizes a court to conduct a hearing to determine if the person is eligible for diversion, as specified, or dismiss the charges against the person. If the person is charged with a felony or alleged to have violated the terms of probation for a felony or mandatory supervision, the court must instead order the person be delivered to a mental health treatment facility, as specified, or make a finding that the person is eligible for diversion, as specified. Existing law, the Sex Offender Registration Act, requires a person convicted of certain crimes to register with law enforcement as a sex offender while residing in California or while attending school or working in California, as specified.This bill would make the incompetence provisions for a person who is mentally incompetent and charged with a misdemeanor that requires registration as a sex offender the same as those for a person who is charged with a felony.

CA AB 1832 - Blanca E. Rubio
Civil Rights Department: Labor Trafficking Task Force.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 8. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1832, as amended, Blanca Rubio. Civil Rights Department: Labor Trafficking Task Force. Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, establishes in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency the Civil Rights Department (department), headed by the Director of Civil Rights, to protect and safeguard the right and opportunity of all persons to seek, obtain, and hold employment without discrimination or abridgment on account of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, family caregiver status, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, age, sexual orientation, reproductive health decisionmaking, or military and veteran status. Existing law requires the department, among other things, to render annually to the Governor and to the Legislature a written report of its activities and recommendations.This bill would establish within the department the Labor Trafficking Task Force, as specified. The bill would require the task force, among other things, to take steps to prevent labor trafficking, coordinate with the Labor Enforcement Task Force, the Department of Justice, and the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement within the Department of Industrial Relations to combat labor trafficking, and refer complaints alleging labor trafficking to the department or other agencies, as appropriate, for potential investigation, civil action, or criminal prosecution. The bill would authorize the task force to coordinate with other relevant agencies to combat labor trafficking, coordinate with specified entities when investigating criminal actions related to labor trafficking, and coordinate with state or local agencies to connect survivors with available services. The bill would require the Division of Occupational Safety and Health within the Department of Industrial Relations to notify the task force when, upon investigating businesses under their purview, there is evidence of labor trafficking. The bill would require the department to include specified information in the annual report described above, including the activities of the task force, the number of complaints referred to the department, and the status or outcome of those complaints. The bill would provide that its provisions become operative only upon appropriation by the Legislature in the annual Budget Act or another measure for the purposes of the bill’s provisions.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.

CA AB 1843 - Freddie Rodriguez
Emergency ambulance employees.
03/14/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (March 13). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1843, as amended, Rodriguez. Emergency ambulance employees. Under the Emergency Ambulance Employee Safety and Preparedness Act, an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 11 at the November 6, 2018, statewide general election, every emergency ambulance employee is entitled to employer-paid mental health services through an employee assistance program (EAP), and requires the EAP coverage to provide up to 10 mental health treatments per issue per calendar year. The act defines “issue” for purposes of those provisions to mean mental health conditions such as, among other things, stress, depression, or substance abuse.This bill would instead require an EAP to provide up to 20 mental health treatments per issue per calendar year, and would include post-traumatic stress disorder in the definition of “issue” for purposes of those provisions. The bill would also require an EAP to schedule an appointment with a mental health treatment provider within 48 hours, upon request of an emergency ambulance employee.This bill would require an emergency ambulance provider to offer to all emergency ambulance employees, upon the employee’s request, peer-to-peer services to provide peer representatives who are available to come to the aid of their fellow employees on a broad range of emotional or professional issues. The bill would require a peer support program to be implemented through a labor-management agreement negotiated separately from a collective bargaining agreement covering affected employees. This bill would specify conditions under which prescribed confidential communications between an emergency ambulance employee and a peer support team member may be disclosed. The bill would specify that an emergency ambulance employee who provides peer support services as a member of a peer support team, and the ambulance agency that employs them, shall not be liable for damages unless an act, error, or omission in performing peer support services constitutes gross negligence or intentional misconduct, except for an action for medical malpractice.Existing law authorizes the act to be amended by a statute enacted by the Legislature with a 4/5 vote that furthers the purposes of the act.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.

CA AB 1857 - Corey A. Jackson
State Air Resources Board: air quality regulation: valleys.
04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 1857, as introduced, Jackson. State Air Resources Board: air quality regulation: valleys. Existing law imposes various limitations on emissions of air contaminants for the control of air pollution from vehicular and nonvehicular sources. Existing law generally designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency with the primary responsibility for the control of vehicular air pollution and air pollution control and air quality management districts with the primary responsibility for the control of air pollution from all sources other than vehicular sources.This bill would require the state board to adopt regulations to improve air quality in population centers located in valleys and would require each local air district to implement those regulations with regard to stationary sources located within its jurisdiction. The bill would make those requirements inoperative on January 1, 2029, and would require the state board, on or before January 1, 2030, to submit a report to the Legislature and specified committees of the Legislature describing any air quality improvements resulting from those regulations.By adding to the duties of local air districts, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1858 - Christopher M. Ward
Comprehensive school safety plans: active shooters: armed assailants: drills.
03/13/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on ED.
AB 1858, as amended, Ward. Comprehensive school safety plans: active shooters: armed assailants: drills. (1) Under existing law, each school district and county office of education is responsible for the overall development of a comprehensive school safety plan for each of its schools operating kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, in cooperation with certain local entities. Existing law requires that the plan include identification of appropriate strategies and programs that will provide or maintain a high level of school safety and address the school’s procedures for complying with existing laws related to school safety. Existing law requires the comprehensive school safety plan to include the development of procedures for conducting tactical responses to criminal incidents, including procedures related to individuals with guns on school campuses and at school-related functions.This bill would additionally require, as part of the comprehensive school safety plan, if the plan includes procedures to prepare for active shooters or other armed assailants by conducting a drill, the development of specified procedures relating to that drill.Existing law prohibits a chartering authority from denying a petition for the establishment of a charter school unless it makes written factual findings supporting at least one of specified bases for denial. One of those bases for denying a petition is if the petition does not contain a reasonably comprehensive description of the development of a school safety plan that includes the same safety topics required in the comprehensive school safety plan of a school district or county office of education.This bill would authorize a chartering authority to deny a charter school petition that does not include in its proposed development of a school safety plan the same provisions on procedures and policies relating to active shooter and armed assailant drills as are required by the bill in a school district or county office of education comprehensive school safety plan. To the extent the bill imposes additional duties on chartering authorities, which include governing boards of school districts and county boards of education, when reviewing the petition for the establishment of a charter school, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The bill would require, on or before June 15, 2025, the State Department of Education to curate and post on its internet website best practices pertaining to school shooter or other armed assailant drills for use by school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools, as provided. The bill would prohibit a school district, county office of education, or charter school from conducting a school shooter or other armed assailant drill unless it adopts policies that conform to these best practices.(2) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1863 - James C. Ramos
California Emergency Services Act: notification systems: Feather Alert.
04/09/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (April 8). Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 1863, as amended, Ramos. California Emergency Services Act: notification systems: Feather Alert. Existing law, the California Emergency Services Act, authorizes use of the Emergency Alert System to inform the public of local, state, and national emergencies. Existing law authorizes a law enforcement agency to request the Department of the California Highway Patrol to activate a “Feather Alert,” as defined, if the law enforcement agency determines that specified criteria are satisfied with respect to an endangered indigenous person who has been reported missing under unexplained or suspicious circumstances. Existing law requires the department, if it concurs that those specified requirements are met, to activate a Feather Alert within the appropriate geographical area requested by the investigating law enforcement agency and to assist the agency by disseminating specified alert messages and signs. Existing law requires the department to create and submit a report to the Governor’s office and the Legislature that includes an evaluation of the Feather Alert, as specified.This bill would require the department, in consultation with specified groups including tribal nations, to develop policies and procedures providing instruction specifying how a law enforcement agency and certain entities involved in emergency warnings are required to proceed after a missing person has been reported to a law enforcement agency, as defined, and prescribed conditions are met. The bill would require those policies and procedures to include, among other things, procedures for the transfer of information regarding the missing person and the circumstances surrounding the missing person’s disappearance, as specified.This bill would require the department to respond to a law enforcement agency’s or tribe’s request to activate a Feather Alert within 48 hours of receiving the request. The bill would require the department to take reasonable steps to confirm that a report from a missing person’s family members is not an attempt to locate an indigenous person who is intentionally avoiding or evading abuse, as specified. If the department declines to activate a Feather Alert, the bill would require it to provide written notice to the requesting law enforcement agency or tribe, as specified.This bill would revise the conditions under which a law enforcement agency may request the department to activate a Feather Alert. In this regard, the bill would authorize the agency to make that request if it determines a Feather Alert would be an effective tool in the investigation of missing and murdered indigenous persons. To make that determination, the bill would require a law enforcement agency to consider prescribed factors, including, among other things, that the agency or tribe believes that the person is in danger and is missing under specified circumstances.This bill would revise the reporting requirement described above to require the department to work with law enforcement agencies and tribal nations to create the report and to submit the report no later than January 1, 2027. The bill would require the report to include information on the efficacy and advantages of the Feather Alert, including, but not limited to, statistical data on the number of cases closed and the number of cases that remain open, and the impact of the Feather Alert on other alert programs.

CA AB 1906 - Michael A. Gipson
Persons with disabilities: terminology.
02/12/2024 - Referred to Com. on JUD.
AB 1906, as introduced, Gipson. Persons with disabilities: terminology. Existing law prohibits, and prescribes heightened penalties for, the commission of specified offenses of abuse committed against an elder or dependent person or dependent adult. Existing law also mandates reporting of known or suspected cases of elder and dependent adult abuse. Existing law defines the terms “dependent person” and “dependent adult” for purposes of these provisions.This bill would change those terms in selected statutes to “person with a disability” and “adult with a disability” and would state the intent of the Legislature that those terms be changed in the remaining code sections provisions of law that use them as changes are made to the code those statutes are amended in the future. The bill would also make conforming changes.

CA AB 1907 - Gail Pellerin
California Child and Family Service Review System: Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) assessment.
04/08/2024 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on HUM. S. Read second time and amended.
AB 1907, as amended, Pellerin. California Child and Family Service Review System: Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) assessment. Existing law requires the department to establish the California Child and Family Service Review System, in order to review all county child welfare systems, including child protective services, foster care, adoption, family preservation, family support, and independent living. Existing law requires the California Health and Human Services Agency to convene a workgroup, as prescribed, to establish a work plan by which child and family service reviews shall be conducted. Existing law requires the workgroup to consider, among other things, measurable outcome indicators, which shall be consistent with specified federal measures and standards.This bill would require the California Child and Family Service Review System to include data from the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) assessment tool.

CA AB 1919 - Akilah Weber
Pupil discipline: suspension and expulsion: restorative justice practices.
03/26/2024 - In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
AB 1919, as amended, Weber. Pupil discipline: suspension and expulsion: restorative justice practices. (1) Existing law requires the State Department of Education to develop evidence-based best practices for restorative justice practice implementation on a school campus and to make these best practices available on the department’s internet website on or before June 1, 2024, as specified.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, require school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to adopt at least one of the best practices for restorative justice practice implementation developed by the department. By imposing new duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(2) Existing law prohibits a pupil from being suspended from school or recommended for expulsion unless the superintendent of the school district or principal of the school determines that the pupil has committed any of various specified acts. Existing law provides that suspension shall be imposed only when other means of correction, including, but not limited to, participation in a restorative justice program, fail to bring about proper conduct, except that the suspension of a pupil for a first offense is authorized if the principal or superintendent of schools determines that the pupil violated one of a certain subset of those enumerated acts or that the pupil’s presence causes a danger to persons.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, instead provide that certain specified suspensions and nonmandatory expulsions shall be imposed only when a restorative justice best practice, adopted as described in paragraph (1) above, fails to bring about proper conduct, except that the suspension of a pupil for a first offense is authorized if the principal or superintendent of schools determines that the pupil violated one of a certain subset of those enumerated acts or that the pupil’s presence causes a danger to persons. The bill also would make conforming changes.(3) Existing law, the Charter Schools Act of 1992, requires a petition to establish a charter school to include, among other things, a reasonably comprehensive description of the procedures by which pupils can be suspended or expelled from the charter school for disciplinary reasons or otherwise involuntarily removed from the charter school for any reason, as specified.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, provide that a charter school may impose a nonmandatory suspension or nonmandatory expulsion only when a restorative justice best practice, adopted as described in paragraph (1) above, fails to bring about proper conduct, unless the charter school principal or their designee determines that the pupil’s presence causes a danger to persons.(4) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1926 - Damon Connolly
Health care coverage: regional enteritis.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1926, as amended, Connolly. Health care coverage: regional enteritis. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of disability insurers, including health insurers, by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan contract and disability insurance policy that provides coverage for hospital, medical, or surgical expenses and is issued, amended, delivered, or renewed on and after July 1, 2000, to provide coverage for the testing and treatment of phenylketonuria, including coverage for the formulas and special food products that are part of a prescribed diet, as specified.This bill would require a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy that provides coverage for hospital, medical, or surgical expenses and is issued, amended, delivered, or renewed on and after July 1, 2025, to provide coverage for dietary enteral formulas, as defined, for the treatment of regional enteritis, as specified. The bill would specify that these provisions do not apply to Medi-Cal managed care plans to the extent that the services are excluded from coverage under the contract between the Medi-Cal managed care plan and the State Department of Health Care Services. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1936 - Sabrina Cervantes
Maternal mental health screenings.
04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 1936, as amended, Cervantes. Maternal mental health screenings. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law also provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan or health insurer to develop a maternal mental health program designed to promote quality and cost-effective outcomes, as specified.This bill would require the program to consist of at least one maternal mental health screening during pregnancy, and at least one additional screening during the first 6 months of the postpartum period, if determined medically necessary and clinically appropriate in the judgment of the treating provider. Because a willful violation of these provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1939 - Brian K. Maienschein
Pupil attendance: county and local school attendance review boards: pupil consultation.
03/21/2024 - From committee: Do pass. To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (March 20).
AB 1939, as amended, Maienschein. Pupil attendance: county and local school attendance review boards: pupil consultation. Existing law authorizes the establishment of county school attendance review boards and local school attendance review boards, and, if established, requires those boards to be composed of at least a parent and 12 representatives of specified entities and community groups, as provided.This bill would require each county school attendance review board and each local school attendance review board to, at least annually, consult with specified pupils for the purpose of soliciting input that will assist board members in gaining a better understanding of, and proposing interventions for, pupil attendance challenges and behavioral challenges.

CA AB 1948 - Miguel Santiago
Homeless multidisciplinary personnel teams.
04/08/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 1948, as amended, Rendon. Homeless multidisciplinary personnel teams. Existing law authorizes a county to establish a homeless adult and family multidisciplinary personnel team with the goal of facilitating the expedited identification, assessment, and linkage of homeless individuals to housing and supportive services within that county, and to allow provider agencies and members of the personnel team to share confidential information for the purpose of coordinating housing and supportive services to ensure continuity of care.Existing law, until January 1, 2025, authorizes the Counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Clara, and Ventura to expand the goals of the homeless adult and family multidisciplinary personnel team to include facilitating the expedited identification, assessment, and linkage of individuals at risk of homelessness, as defined, to housing and supportive services, and the expedited prevention of homelessness.This bill would additionally authorize the County of San Mateo to expand the goals of the homeless adult and family multidisciplinary personnel team, as specified above. The bill would also delete the January 1, 2025, repeal of these provisions, thereby making the provisions operative indefinitely.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the Counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Ventura.

CA AB 1954 - Marie Alvarado-Gil
Sexually violent predators.
03/18/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S. pursuant to Assembly Rule 96.
AB 1954, as amended, Alanis. Sexually violent predators. Existing law provides for the civil commitment of a person who is determined to be a sexually violent predator. Existing law establishes a procedure by which a person committed as a sexually violent predator may petition for conditional release. Existing law requires the counsel for the committed individual, the sheriff or the chief of police of the locality for placement, and the county counsel and the district attorney of the county of domicile, or their designees, to provide assistance and consultation in the State Department of State Hospitals’ process of locating and securing housing within the county. Existing law generally requires the committed individual to be placed in their county of domicile before their incarceration, but authorizes consideration of, and placement in, an alternative placement county in extraordinary circumstances. When the department makes a recommendation for conditional release or community outpatient treatment, existing law requires the department to notify specified persons of its recommendation and include specified information.This bill would additionally require the sheriff or the chief of police of an alternative placement locality and the county counsel and the district attorney of an alternative placement county to provide assistance and consultation in the department’s process of locating and securing housing for a sexually violent predator. The bill would require the above-described notice to be sent electronically and by certified mail. By imposing a higher level of service on local government, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1955 - Christopher M. Ward
Pupil health: school-based health services and school-based mental health services.
04/10/2024 - In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
AB 1955, as introduced, Ward. Pupil health: school-based health services and school-based mental health services. Existing law establishes the State Department of Education in state government, and vests the department with specified powers and duties relating to the state’s public school system, including encouraging and assisting school districts to improve and monitor the health of their pupils. Existing law requires the department, as part of that assistance, to provide information and guidance to schools that request the information and guidance to establish “Health Days” to provide screenings for common health problems among pupils.This bill would require the department to include county offices of education and charter schools in the above-described provisions. The bill would require the department to encourage school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to participate in programs that offer reimbursement for school-based health services and school-based mental health services, as provided.

CA AB 1970 - Corey A. Jackson
Mental Health: Black Mental Health Navigator Certification.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 13. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 1970, as amended, Jackson. Mental Health: Black Mental Health Navigator Certification. Existing law establishes, within the Health and Welfare Agency, the Department of Health Care Access and Information, which is responsible for, among other things, administering various health professions training and development programs. Existing law requires the department to develop and approve statewide requirements for community health worker certificate programs. Existing law defines “community health worker” to mean a liaison, link, or intermediary between health and social services and the community to facilitate access to services and to improve the access and cultural competence of service delivery.This bill would require the department to develop criteria for a specialty certificate program and specialized training requirements for a Black Mental Health Navigator Certification, as specified. The bill would require the department to collect and regularly publish data, not less than annually, including, but not limited to, the number of individuals certified, including those who complete a specialty certificate program, as specified, and the number of individuals who are actively employed in a community health worker role.

CA AB 20 - Michael A. Gipson
Postadoption contact agreements: reinstatement of parental rights.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 20, as amended, Gipson. Postadoption contact agreements: reinstatement of parental rights. Existing law provides that a child may be adjudged to be a dependent of the juvenile court because of abuse or neglect. Existing law requires the court to review the status of certain dependent children no less frequently than once every 6 months and requires a supplemental report to be filed as part of that review. Existing law requires, when the report is regarding a child for whom the court has ordered parental rights terminated and who has been ordered placed for adoption, or, for an Indian child for whom parental rights are not being terminated and a tribal customary adoption is being considered, the report to include, among other things, a description of whether the final adoption order should include provisions for postadoptive sibling contact. This bill would instead require the report to include a description, if applicable, of the status of the postadoptive sibling agreement.Existing law provides a procedure for permanently terminating parental rights with regard to a child who has been adjudged a dependent child of the juvenile court. Existing law requires the social worker or probation officer to give notice of a hearing to terminate parental rights to specified individuals, including, among others, any known sibling of the child who is the subject of the hearing if the sibling is either the subject of a dependency proceeding or has been adjudged a dependent child of the juvenile court.This bill would also require that notice be provided to siblings who are nonminor dependents as well as to the child’s Court-Appointed Special Advocate, if one has been appointed. The bill would establish a procedure for certain children and nonminor dependents for whom the parental rights of their biological parent or parents were terminated to petition the court to reinstate or modify their biological parent’s or parents’ parental rights, as specified.Existing law requires, if parental rights are terminated and the court orders a dependent child or ward to be placed for adoption, the county, to the extent practicable, to convene a meeting with the child, the sibling or siblings of the child, the prospective adoptive parent or parents, and a facilitator for the purpose of deciding whether to voluntarily execute a postadoption sibling contact agreement. Existing law provides that the county placing agency is not required to convene a meeting to decide whether to voluntarily execute a postadoption sibling contact agreement if specified circumstances occur. This bill would instead specify that the purpose of the meeting is to discuss a postadoption sibling contact agreement within 90 days after termination of parental rights and prior to finalization of the adoption, as specified.Existing law allows, in an adoption proceeding, for continuing contact between the birth relatives and a child if a postadoption contact agreement is entered into voluntarily and is in the best interests of the child at the time the adoption petition is granted. Existing law specifies that a postadoption contact agreement with siblings with whom the child does not have a preexisting relationship may only include provisions for the sharing of information about the child.This bill would permit a postadoption contact agreement with siblings with whom the child does not have a preexisting relationship to also include provisions for visitation and for future contact.The bill would make conforming changes.By increasing the duties of county placing agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 8616.5 of

CA AB 2026 - Devon John Mathis
Disabilities: person-first terminology.
03/12/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 2026, as introduced, Mathis. Disabilities: person-first terminology. Existing law makes various references to the terms “autistic children,” “developmentally disabled children,” “developmentally disabled adults,” “disabled adults,” “severely disabled children,” and “seriously emotionally disturbed children” in provisions of the Health and Safety Code and Welfare and Institutions Code.This bill would make technical changes to those terms to put the person first, and would make other technical, nonsubstantive changes.

CA AB 2033 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
Public postsecondary education: electronic benefits transfer cards: basic needs services and resources.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on HUM. S. (Ayes 10. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2033, as amended, Reyes. Public postsecondary education: electronic benefits transfer cards: basic needs services and resources. (1) Existing law provides for the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), administered in California as CalFresh, under which each county distributes nutrition assistance benefits provided by the federal government to eligible households for the purchase of certain eligible foods at approved retail food stores. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families. Existing law, administered by the State Department of Social Services, provides for the establishment of a statewide electronic benefits transfer (EBT) system for the purpose of providing financial and food assistance benefits, and authorizes a county to deliver CalFresh and CalWORKs benefits through the use of the EBT system.Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges, the California State University, and the University of California as the 3 segments of public postsecondary education in the state. Existing law requires each campus of the California Community Colleges and the Trustees of the California State University, and requests the Regents of the University of California, to provide, as a part of campus orientation, educational information to all incoming students about certain public benefit programs, including, among others, CalFresh and the student eligibility requirements for CalFresh.This bill would require, on or before September 1, 2025, each campus of the California Community Colleges and each campus of the California State University, and request each University of California campus, to identify and apply for at least one general store or a store that sells food on campus to become an authorized retail food store under SNAP and, if approved, ensure the store or stores accept the use of EBT cards, as specified. To the extent that the bill would impose new duties on community college districts, it would impose a state-mandated local program.(2) Existing law requires each community college campus to establish the position of the Basic Needs Coordinator to assist students with on- and off-campus housing, food, mental health, and other basic needs services and resources, among other responsibilities, and to establish a Basic Needs Center where basic needs services, resources, and staff are made available to students, as provided. Existing law requires each community college campus to develop a document for students that clearly lists all on- and off-campus basic needs services and resources that includes specified information. Existing law requires each community college campus to report specified information related to basic needs services and resources to the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges, and requires the chancellor’s office to develop and submit to the Governor and the Legislature an annual report based on, among other things, the data and information reported by campuses.This bill would require each community college campus, on or before September 1, 2025, to update the basic needs services and resources document to include the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service’s “SNAP Retail Locator” internet website link, as specified. To the extent that the bill would impose new duties on community college districts, it would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would require each California State University campus, and request each University of California campus, to also establish the position of Basic Needs Coordinator and establish a Basic Needs Center, as described above. The bill would also require each California State University campus, and request each University of California campus, to develop, on or before February 1, 2025, among other things, a document for student

CA AB 2036 - Joe Patterson
Sexually violent predators.
04/10/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2036, as amended, Joe Patterson. Sexually violent predators. Existing law provides for the civil commitment of a person who is determined to be a sexually violent predator. Existing law establishes a procedure by which a person committed as a sexually violent predator may petition for conditional release and requires the court, if it makes a specified determination, to place the person on conditional release. Existing law generally requires that a person released on conditional release pursuant to these provisions be placed in the person’s county of domicile prior to their incarceration unless extraordinary circumstances exist requiring placement outside the county, as specified. Existing law requires the department to convene a committee consisting of the counsel for the committed individual, the sheriff or the chief of police of the locality for placement, and the county counsel and the district attorney of the county of domicile, or their designees, to provide assistance and consultation to the department in locating and securing housing.This bill would require that a meeting of the above-described committee be conducted with each individual present and occur only in the county of domicile with a representative of the department personally present. The bill would prohibit the department from attending remotely.

CA AB 2040 - Marie Waldron
Prison and parole: California Reentry Officer.
03/19/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 8. Noes 0.) (March 19). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2040, as introduced, Waldron. Prison and parole: California Reentry Officer. Existing law grants the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) authority to operate the state prison system and gives the department jurisdiction over various state prisons and other institutions. Existing law requires the department to determine and implement a system of incentives to increase inmate participation in, and completion of, academic and vocational education, consistent with the inmate’s educational needs, as specified. Existing law requires the department to develop and implement a plan to obtain additional rehabilitation and treatment services for prison inmates and parolees, and requires the department to expand substance abuse treatment services in prisons to accommodate at least 4,000 additional inmates who have histories of substance abuse, as specified.This bill would establish the position of the California Reentry Officer, independent from the CDCR, to provide statewide leadership, coordination, and technical assistance to promote effective state and local efforts to ensure successful reentry services are provided to incarcerated individuals. The bill would require the officer to focus on programming through the period of incarceration that supports successful reentry to society, facilitate the smooth transition of individuals from prison to release, and raise awareness of continuity of care for incarcerated individuals with health and substance use disorders during community supervision and parole, among other things.This bill would require the officer to be appointed by the Governor for a 4-year term and serve at the will of the Governor. The bill would require the officer to prepare a report, to be submitted to the Governor and the Legislature, on or before December 1, 2027, and annually thereafter.

CA AB 2052 - Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer Sr.
School-Based Health and Education Partnership Program.
04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on ED.
AB 2052, as amended, Jones-Sawyer. School-Based Health and Education Partnership Program. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health, in cooperation with the State Department of Education, to establish a Public School Health Center Support Program to assist health centers in schools and school districts. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health, subject to an appropriation, to establish a grant program to provide funding for, among other things, expansion, renovation, and retrofitting of existing school health centers. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to develop a request for proposal process in order to collect information on applicants and determine which proposals shall receive funding. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to give preference to, among others, schools with a high percentage of low-income and uninsured children and youth or schools with a shortage of health professionals. Existing law defines, among other things, a “school health center” for those purposes to mean a center or program, located at or near a local educational agency, that provides age-appropriate health care services at the program site or through referrals. This bill would instead define a “school-based health center” for those purposes to mean a student-focused health center or clinic that, among other things, is located at or near a school and is organized through school, community, and health provider relationships. The bill would instead require, on or before January 1, 2026, the State Department of Public Health to collaborate with the Office of School-Based Health Programs within the State Department of Education in order to award grant funding, as specified, to applicants. This bill would revise and reorganize the above-described preferred recipients and give preference to school-based health centers, as defined, serving, among others, schools in which more than 55% of pupils serviced are unduplicated pupils, as defined, or areas experiencing health disparities in child and adolescent access to primary care, behavioral health, preventive health, or oral health services.Existing law requires the above-described Public School Health Center Support Program to perform various functions, including, serving as a liaison between organizations within the department, as specified.This bill would instead require the State Department of Public Health, in collaboration with the Office of School-Based Health Programs within the State Department of Education, to provide the above-described assistance to school-based health centers. The bill would also repeal a related provision requiring the Public School Health Center Support Program, in collaboration with the State Department of Education, to act as a liaison for school-based health centers.Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health, upon appropriation, to establish standardized data collection procedures and collect certain data, relating to services and funding, from school health centers on an ongoing basis.This bill would require the school-based health centers to report data to the State Department of Public Health if they receive grant funding. The bill would eliminate the requirement on the State Department of Public Health to collect data on health services provided at a local educational agency outside a school health center.This bill would make other conforming changes.

CA AB 2064 - Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer Sr.
Community Violence Interdiction Grant Program.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on HEALTH. (Ayes 7. Noes 1.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2064, as amended, Jones-Sawyer. Community Violence Interdiction Grant Program. Existing law establishes the California Violence Intervention and Prevention Grant Program, administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award competitive grants for the purpose of violence intervention and prevention. Existing law establishes the Youth Reinvestment Grant Program within the Board of State and Community Corrections to grant funds, upon appropriation, to local jurisdictions and Indian tribes for the purpose of implementing trauma-informed diversion programs for minors, as specified.Existing law requires the governing board of a school district to give diligent care to the health and physical development of pupils and authorizes the governing board of a school district to employ properly certified persons for the work. Existing law requires a school of a school district or county office of education and a charter school to notify pupils and parents or guardians of pupils no less than twice during the school year on how to initiate access to available pupil mental health services on campus or in the community, or both, as provided. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health, in cooperation with the State Department of Education, to establish a Public School Health Center Support Program, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to assist school health centers, which are defined as centers or programs, located at or near local educational agencies, that provide age-appropriate health care services at the program site or through referrals, as specified.This bill would create the Community Violence Interdiction Grant Program to be administered by the California Health and Human Services Agency to provide funding to local community programs for community-driven solutions to decrease violence in neighborhoods and schools. The bill would specify the types of programs the grant funds may be used for, including, but not limited to, programs that create and enhance recreation- and health-based interventions for youth during peak times of violence and the creation and operation of school-based health centers. The bill would require the agency to develop an application process and criteria for funding and would require the agency to administer the grant program, as specified. The bill would require, beginning July 31, 2025, and annually thereafter, the Director of Finance and the Legislative Analyst’s Office to calculate the savings to the state from the closure of state prisons, as specified, and would require the Director of Finance to certify the results of the calculation to the Controller no later than August 1 of each fiscal year. The bill would create the Community Violence Interdiction Grant Fund as a continuously appropriated fund and would require that the Controller, before August 15, 2025, and annually thereafter, transfer from the General Fund to the Community Violence Interdiction Grant Fund the total amount of savings from the closure of state prisons so calculated. By continuously appropriating these funds, the bill would make an appropriation.

CA AB 21 - Michael A. Gipson
Peace officers: training.
05/18/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 21, as introduced, Gipson. Peace officers: training. Existing law requires specified categories of law enforcement officers to meet training standards pursuant to courses of training certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Existing law requires POST to require field training officers who are instructors for the field training program to have at least 8 hours of crisis intervention behavioral health training to better train new peace officers on how to effectively interact with persons with mental illness or intellectual disability. This bill would require the commission to revise that training to include instruction on how to effectively interact with persons with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. The bill would specify that a field training officer who completed the training prior to January 1, 2025, or who is exempt from completing the training, is not required to take the updated training, but would require a field training officer who has not completed the training on or after January 1, 2025, or who is not exempt from completing the training, to complete the revised training. The bill would exempt jurisdictions that, prior to January 1, 2024, develop a training that meets the same requirements.This bill would also require the commission, upon the next regularly scheduled review of a training module relating to persons with disabilities, to create and distribute electronically a course on how to recognize and interact with persons with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The bill would require peace officers appointed on or before July 1, 2029, to complete that course by January 1, 2030, and peace officers appointed after July 1, 2029, to complete that course within 180 days of being appointed, as specified. The bill would exempt jurisdictions that, prior to January 1, 2024, develop a training that meets the same requirements. By creating new duties for local officials, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2119 - Akilah Weber
Mental health.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2119, as amended, Weber. Mental health. Existing law makes various references to the descriptive terms “persons with a mental health disorder,” “minors with a mental health condition,” and “children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbance” in various provisions of the Welfare and Institutions Code.This bill would make conforming changes to these provisions for consistency with those descriptor terms to, among other things, put the person first. The bill would also make other technical changes.

CA AB 2121 - Diane B. Dixon
Substance use disorder treatment: licensing.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2121, as amended, Dixon. Substance use disorder treatment: licensing. Existing law authorizes the State Department of Health Care Services to issue a license to operate an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility if specified conditions are met, including submission of a written application and licensing fee.This bill would additionally require the facility to confirm that it is located more than 300 feet from any alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility or any community care facility, as specified, and would require the department to notify in writing the city or the county in which the facility is located of the issuance of a license, as specified.

CA AB 2131 - Avelino Valencia
Certified nurse assistant training programs.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2131, as amended, Valencia. Certified nurse assistant training programs. Existing law establishes the State Department of Public Health and sets forth its powers and duties to license and administer health facilities, as defined, including skilled nursing facilities and intermediate care facilities.Existing law requires skilled nursing facilities and intermediate care facilities to adopt certified nurse assistant training programs approved by the department. A violation of the provisions relating to those training requirements is a misdemeanor. Existing law requires the department to prepare and maintain a list of approved training programs for nurse assistant certification, training programs conducted by skilled nursing facilities or intermediate care facilities, as well as local agencies and education programs.This bill additionally would require the department to publish an update of approved training programs at least twice annually, and to include the competency test pass rates, aggregated by the language in which the test was taken. The bill would require the department, no later than December 31, 2025, to provide, or contract with an approved vendor to provide, a nurse assistant certification examination that includes the option to take the written and oral competency examination in Spanish.

CA AB 2142 - Matt Haney
Prisons: mental health.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 8. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2142, as introduced, Haney. Prisons: mental health. Existing law authorizes the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to establish and maintain classes for incarcerated persons utilizing institutional personnel or entering into an agreement with the governing board of a school district or private school. Existing law requires the department to develop and implement a plan to obtain additional rehabilitation and treatment services for incarcerated persons and parolees. Existing law requires that plan to include, among other things, filling vacant state staff positions that provide direct and indirect rehabilitation services, or obtaining services from local governments and contractors to assist with treatment for parolees and incarcerated persons.This bill would require the department to establish a 3-year pilot program at 2 or more institutions that would provide access to specified mental health therapy for those not classified by the department to receive mental health treatment from the institution. The bill would require communications during therapy sessions, as specified, between the incarcerated person and assigned therapist to be confidential. The bill would require the California Correctional Health Care Services to be the custodian of records for treatment records generated under this pilot program. The bill would require the department to report certain information to the fiscal and appropriate policy committees of the Legislature, from March 1, 2025, to March 1, 2027.The bill would make related findings and declarations.

CA AB 2154 - Marc Berman
Mental health: involuntary treatment.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2154, as amended, Berman. Mental health: involuntary treatment. Under existing law, a person who, as a result of a mental health disorder, is a danger to self or others or is gravely disabled, may, upon probable cause, be taken into custody and placed in a facility designated by the county and approved by the State Department of Health Care Services for up to 72 hours for evaluation and treatment. Existing law provides that each person who is involuntarily detained for evaluation or treatment, as specified, or admitted as a voluntary patient for psychiatric evaluation or treatment to a health facility, as specified, and each person who is committed to a state hospital, has certain rights, including the right to receive a copy of the State Department of Health Care Services prepared patients’ rights handbook.This bill would require a facility to which a person is brought for involuntary detention to provide a copy of the State Department of Health Care Services’ prepared patients’ rights handbook to a family member of the detained person, as specified. The bill would define “family member” for these purposes to include, among others, the spouse or domestic partner of the person and the parent or legal guardian of the person.

CA AB 2160 - Tina McKinnor
California Women’s Care Act.
02/29/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2160, as amended, McKinnor. California Women’s Care Act. Existing law gives a judge discretion when deciding various matters in a criminal proceeding, including, among other things, issuing bail or releasing a defendant on their own recognizance, accepting a diversion or deferred entry of judgment agreement, and imposing sentences and granting probation.This bill would, when a court is exercising its discretion with regard to these matters, make a rebuttable presumption against detention and incarceration of a pregnant or postpartum defendant, as defined, if the defendant provides the court and district attorney with notice of the defendant’s status as a pregnant or postpartum defendant at each applicable stage of the proceedings. The bill would require a court that decides to detain or incarcerate a defendant after this consideration to make specific findings on the record that the risk to public safety or any other factor the court is required to consider is substantial enough to outweigh the risk of incarceration, as specified.The bill would authorize any pregnant or postpartum defendant to request a stay of execution of their sentence by filing a written request to the court if the pregnant or postpartum defendant is detained or incarcerated in a county jail or state prison for any period of time through the end of the pregnancy or the postpartum period, except as specified. The bill would require the court to apply the rebuttable presumption above when considering whether to grant that stay of execution. The bill would authorize a court to order a stay of execution of the sentence for any period of time through the end of the pregnancy or the postpartum period.The bill would authorize a person who may be pregnant or postpartum and who is arrested or in custody in a county jail or state prison to request a pregnancy test upon or following admission to the county jail or state prison, and would require the county jail or state prison to provide a pregnancy test upon request and allow the person to take the pregnancy test within 24 hours after the request. By imposing additional duties on county jails, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2161 - Joaquin Arambula
The Early Psychosis Intervention Plus Program.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 16. Noes 0.) (April 9).
AB 2161, as amended, Arambula. The Early Psychosis Intervention Plus Program. Existing law establishes the Early Psychosis Intervention Plus (EPI Plus) Program to encompass early psychosis and mood disorder detection and intervention. Existing law establishes the Early Psychosis and Mood Disorder Detection and Intervention Fund and makes the moneys in the fund available, upon appropriation, to the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission. Existing law authorizes the commission to allocate moneys from that fund to provide grants to create or expand existing capacity for early psychosis and mood disorder detection and intervention services and supports.This bill would require the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission to consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and related state departments and entities, create a strategic plan to achieve specific goals, including improving the understanding of psychosis, as specified, and, no later than July 1, 2025, submit that strategic plan to the relevant policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature. The bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services to seek to partner with the University of California to develop a plan to establish the Center for Mental Health Wellness and Innovations to, among other things, promote the widespread availability of evidence-based practices to improve behavioral health services. If the center is established, the bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services, no later than July 1, 2025, to submit the plan to create the center to the relevant policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature.

CA AB 2168 - Ash Kalra
Prisons: anticipated prison stays.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2168, as amended, Kalra. Prisons: anticipated prison stays. Under existing law, a felony is a crime that is punishable by imprisonment in the state prison, or by imprisonment in a county jail for more than one year. Under existing law, a misdemeanor is a crime punishable by less than one year in the county jail.This bill would require a court, at the time of sentencing and if a court is imposing a prison sentence, to determine the defendant’s anticipated prison stay, as defined, and, if that anticipated stay is for 365 days or fewer, to order that the defendant serve the sentence in the custody of the sheriff or county jail administrator, unless that order is prohibited by an initiative statute. The bill would require specified reports by probation departments to include an estimate of the defendant’s anticipated prison stay. By imposing additional duties on county jails and probation departments, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law prevents a person committed to the custody of the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation from being subject to prosecution for a nonfelony offense arising out of, among other things, the operation of a motor vehicle, that is pending against them at the time of commitment.This bill would prohibit a person committed to the department, to a county facility as a ward of the juvenile court, or to a county jail from being prosecuted for a nonfelony offense pending against them at the time of their commitment, except as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2207 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
State boards and commissions: representatives of older adults.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Coms. on AGING & L.T.C. and HUM. S.
AB 2207, as introduced, Reyes. State boards and commissions: representatives of older adults. Existing law establishes the California Commission on Aging composed of 25 persons, as specified, and requires the commission to hire an executive director. Existing law also establishes the California Department of Aging and provides for a director of that department. Existing law establishes various state boards and commissions to address public health concerns throughout the state and generally requires that individuals appointed to these state entities be broadly reflective of the general public.This bill would expand the membership of the Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Advisory Committee, the California Health Workforce Education and Training Council, the California Workforce Development Board, the California Behavioral Health Planning Council, the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, and the Interagency Council on Homelessness to include the Executive Director of the California Commission on Aging, the Director of the California Department of Aging, or both, or other persons that serve or advocate for older adults, as specified. This bill would also modify the membership of an advisory committee to the Interagency Council on Homelessness to specifically include representatives from organizations that serve or advocate on behalf of older adults, among others.

CA AB 221 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Act of 2023.
01/26/2023 - Referred to Com. on BUDGET.
AB 221, as introduced, Ting. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 2215 - Isaac Bryan
Criminal procedure: arrests.
04/04/2024 - Read second time. Ordered to third reading.
AB 2215, as introduced, Bryan. Criminal procedure: arrests. Existing law requires that a person arrested without a warrant be taken before a magistrate without unnecessary delay. Existing law also provides certain circumstances under which a person arrested without a warrant may be released from custody before being taken before a magistrate, including, among others, when the arresting officer believes that insufficient grounds exist to make a criminal complaint against the person arrested or when the person is arrested for intoxication only and no further proceedings are desirable. Existing law requires the record of arrest of a person released pursuant to specified circumstances to include a record of release and that the arrest be deemed a detention. This bill would authorize an arresting officer to release an arrested person from custody without bringing the person before a magistrate if the person is, subsequent to being arrested, delivered or referred to a public health or social service organization that provides services including, but not limited to, housing, medical care, treatment for alcohol or substance use disorders, psychological counseling, or employment training and education, and no further proceedings are desirable. The bill would require that the arrest under this provision be deemed a detention.

CA AB 222 - Joaquin Arambula
Civil Rights Department: Californians with disabilities workgroup.
02/02/2023 - Referred to Com. on JUD.
AB 222, as introduced, Arambula. Civil Rights Department: Californians with disabilities workgroup. Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, establishes the Civil Rights Department within the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency under the direction of the Director of Civil Rights. Existing law sets forth the powers and duties of the department, which include receiving, investigating, conciliating, mediating, and prosecuting complaints alleging unlawful practices or violations of specified civil rights provisions, including those based on a mental or physical disability, as defined.This bill would require the department to convene a workgroup to make recommendations to the Legislature for the development of accessibility and antidiscrimination laws for people with disabilities, as defined. The bill would require membership of the workgroup to include interested parties and stakeholders that reflect the diversity of the state, including, among other groups, individuals who have personal experience with a disability. The bill would require the workgroup to take specified actions, including examining existing laws and policies related to, among other issues, improving the effective enforcement of civil rights laws.This bill would require the department, based on the findings of the workgroup, to submit a report to the Legislature by July 1, 2025, containing recommendations on ways to achieve specified goals and priorities of the workgroup. The bill would also require the Legislature to hold public hearings on the results of the report within one year of submission of that report.This bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2028.This bill would include related legislative findings.

CA AB 223 - Toni G. Atkins
Change of gender and sex identifier.
09/23/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 221, Statutes of 2023.
AB 223, Ward. Change of gender and sex identifier. Existing law authorizes a person to file a petition with the superior court seeking a judgment recognizing their change of gender to female, male, or nonbinary, including a person who is under 18 years of age. Existing law authorizes a person to file a single petition to simultaneously change the petitioner’s name and recognize the change to the petitioner’s gender and sex identifier, as specified. This bill would require any petition for a change of gender and sex identifier or a petition for change of gender, sex identifier, and name filed by a person under 18 years of age, and any papers associated with the proceeding, to be kept confidential by the court. The bill would require the court to limit access to these records to specified individuals, including, among others, the minor, the minor’s parents, and their attorneys.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.

CA AB 2237 - Cecilia M. Aguiar-Curry
Children and youth: transfer of specialty mental health services.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on HUM. S. (Ayes 16. Noes 0.) (April 9).
AB 2237, as amended, Aguiar-Curry. Children and youth: transfer of specialty mental health services. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services (department), under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Under existing law, specialty mental health services include federal Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services provided to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries under 21 years of age.This bill would require, when a child or youth 18 years of age or younger changes residence from one county to another, the receiving county to provide specialty mental health services while the receiving county conducts its investigation and casework transfer process, if specified conditions are met, including, but not limited to, that the child or youth has been identified by the county of original residence as high risk or coming from a vulnerable population. The bill also would require the State Department of Health Care Services and the State Department of Social Services to collaborate to create a system of standardized communication between counties that respects the procedures of the receiving county and the needs of the child that is without mental health services, and require the State Department of Social Services to establish care teams to help counties coordinate and expedite the transfer between counties. By increasing duties of counties administering the Medi-Cal program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2270 - Brian K. Maienschein
Healing arts: continuing education: menopausal mental or physical health.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2270, as amended, Maienschein. Healing arts: continuing education: menopausal mental or physical health. Existing law, the Medical Practice Act, establishes the Medical Board of California and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of physicians and surgeons, including osteopathic physicians and surgeons. Existing law, the Nursing Practice Act, establishes the Board of Registered Nursing and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of the practice of nursing. Existing law, the Psychology Licensing Law, establishes the Board of Psychology and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of psychologists. Existing law, the Physician Assistant Practice Act, establishes the Physician Assistant Board and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of physician assistants.Existing law, the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Act, the Clinical Social Worker Practice Act, the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act, and the Educational Psychologist Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of the practices of marriage and family therapy, clinical social work, professional clinical counseling, and education psychology, respectively, by the Board of Behavioral Sciences.Existing law establishes continuing education requirements for all of these various healing arts practitioners.This bill would require the above-specified boards, in determining their continuing education requirements, to consider including a course in menopausal mental or physical health.

CA AB 2282 - Tina McKinnor
Family reunification services.
04/09/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on HUM. S. (Ayes 8. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2282, as introduced, McKinnor. Family reunification services. Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which may adjudge children to be dependents of the court under certain circumstances, including when the child suffered or there is a substantial risk that the child will suffer serious physical harm, or a parent fails to provide the child with adequate food, clothing, shelter, or medical treatment. Existing law establishes the grounds for removal of a dependent child from the custody of the child’s parents or guardian, and requires the court to order the social worker to provide designated child welfare services, including family reunification services, as prescribed. Existing law provides that reunification services do not need to be provided to a parent or guardian when the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, certain circumstances exist, including that the parent or guardian of the child has been convicted of a violent felony, as defined.This bill would instead provide that reunification services do not need to be provided to a parent or guardian when the court finds that the parent or guardian of the child has been convicted of a violent felony against a child. By expanding the scope of individuals requiring reunification services, the bill would impose additional duties on county child welfare departments, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 229 - Joe Patterson
Violent felonies.
05/23/2023 - From committee: Without further action pursuant to Joint Rule 62(a).
AB 229, as introduced, Joe Patterson. Violent felonies. Existing law defines the term “violent felony” for various purposes, including, among others, enhancing the punishment for felonies pursuant to existing sentencing provisions commonly known as the Three Strikes Law.This bill would expand the crimes that are within the definition of a violent felony for all purposes, including for purposes of the Three Strikes Law, to include additional forms of sexual crimes, as defined, human trafficking, as defined, and felony domestic violence, as defined. By expanding the scope of an enhancement, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2295 - Dawn Addis
Crimes: commencement of prosecution.
02/26/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2295, as introduced, Addis. Crimes: commencement of prosecution. Existing law generally requires that the prosecution of a felony sex offense be commenced within 10 years after the commission of the offense. Existing law requires specified sex offenses that are committed when the victim is under 18 years of age and under certain circumstances, such as rape of a person with a mental disorder or disability or sodomy with force or fear, to be commenced by the victim’s 40th birthday.This bill would allow the prosecution of these specified sex offenses to be commenced at any time, as specified.

CA AB 2307 - Laurie Davies
California Victim Compensation Board: reimbursement: self-defense courses.
04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 2307, as introduced, Davies. California Victim Compensation Board: reimbursement: self-defense courses. Existing law generally provides for the compensation of victims and derivative victims of specified types of crimes by the California Victim Compensation Board from the Restitution Fund, which is continuously appropriated to the board. Existing law authorizes the board to grant for pecuniary loss, when the board determines that it will best aid the person seeking compensation, as specified. Existing law authorizes the board to reimburse, among other things, the expense of installing or increasing residential security, as specified.This bill would also authorize the board to reimburse the expense of enrollment and participation in self-defense courses offered, provided, or operated by a nonprofit organization, university, or law enforcement agency, in an amount not to exceed $1000. By expanding the authorizations for use of moneys in the Restitution Fund, a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation.

CA AB 2340 - Mia Bonta
Medi-Cal: EPSDT services: informational materials.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2340, as amended, Bonta. Medi-Cal: EPSDT services: informational materials. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive medically necessary health care services, through fee-for-service or managed care delivery systems. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Under existing law, early and periodic screening, diagnostic, and treatment (EPSDT) services are covered under Medi-Cal for an individual under 21 years of age in accordance with certain federal provisions.Existing federal regulations require the state to provide for a combination of written and oral methods designed to inform individuals eligible for EPSDT services, or their families, about the EPSDT program, within 60 days of the individual’s initial Medicaid eligibility determination and, in the case of families that have not utilized EPSDT services, annually thereafter, as specified. Under those regulations, required information includes, among other components, the benefits of preventive health care and the services available under the EPSDT program and where and how to obtain those services.This bill would require the department to prepare written informational materials that effectively explain and clarify the scope and nature of EPSDT services, as defined, that are available under the Medi-Cal program. Under the bill, the materials would include, but would not be limited to, the information required in the above-described federal regulations or their successor. Under the bill, the informational materials would also include content designed for youth, for purposes of delivery of that content to a beneficiary who is 12 years of age or older but under 21 years of age.The bill would authorize the department to standardize the materials, as specified, and would require the department to regularly review the materials to ensure that they are up to date. The bill would require the department to test the quality, clarity, and cultural concordance of translations of the informational materials with Medi-Cal beneficiaries, in order to ensure that the materials use clear and nontechnical language that effectively informs beneficiaries.The bill would require the department or a Medi-Cal managed care plan, depending on the delivery system, to provide to a beneficiary who is eligible for EPSDT services, or to the parent or other authorized representative of that beneficiary, as applicable, the informational materials within 60 calendar days after that beneficiary’s initial Medi-Cal eligibility determination and annually thereafter.

CA AB 235 - Blanca E. Rubio
Civil Rights Department: Labor Trafficking Unit.
05/18/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 235, as amended, Blanca Rubio. Civil Rights Department: Labor Trafficking Unit. Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, establishes in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency the Civil Rights Department, headed by the Director of Civil Rights, to protect and safeguard the right and opportunity of all persons to seek, obtain, and hold employment without discrimination or abridgment on account of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, age, sexual orientation, reproductive health decisionmaking, or military and veteran status.This bill would establish within the department the Labor Trafficking Unit, which would be required to coordinate with the Labor Enforcement Task Force, the Criminal Investigation Unit, the Department of Justice, and the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement within the Department of Industrial Relations to combat labor trafficking. The bill would require the unit to receive and investigate complaints alleging labor trafficking and take steps to prevent labor trafficking. The bill would require the unit to coordinate with or refer cases to the Labor Enforcement Task Force or the department for potential civil actions, and to coordinate with or refer cases to the Department of Justice for potential criminal actions. The bill would require the unit to follow protocols to ensure survivors of labor trafficking are not victimized by the process of prosecuting traffickers and are informed of the services available to them. The bill would require the unit to coordinate with both state and local agencies to connect survivors with available services. The bill would require the unit to provide specified services to victims, including providing a list of pro bono victim’s rights attorneys to survivors. The bill would require the Division of Occupational Safety and Health within the Department of Industrial Relations to notify the unit when, upon investigating businesses under their purview, there is evidence of labor trafficking. The bill would require the unit, beginning January 1, 2025, until January 1, 2035, to annually submit a report to the Legislature with specified information relating to labor trafficking complaints, including the number, types, and outcomes of complaints.

CA AB 2351 - Josh Lowenthal
Suspensions and expulsions: acts occurring outside of school hours.
04/08/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2351, as amended, Lowenthal. Suspensions and expulsions: acts occurring outside of school hours. Existing law prohibits a pupil from being suspended from school or recommended for expulsion, unless the superintendent of the school district or the principal of the school in which the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil has committed an act from a list of specified acts. Existing law authorizes suspension or expulsion for one of those acts if the act is related to a school activity or school attendance occurring at any time, including while going to and coming from school. Existing law also authorizes suspension or recommendation for expulsion if the superintendent or the principal of the school determines that a pupil enrolled in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive, has committed sexual harassment, as defined; a pupil enrolled in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive, has caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause, or participated in an act of, hate violence, as defined; a pupil enrolled in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive, has intentionally engaged in harassment, threats, or intimidation, directed against school district personnel or pupils, that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to have the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting classwork, creating substantial disorder, and invading the rights of either school personnel or pupils by creating an intimidating or hostile educational environment; or a pupil, of any grade, has made terroristic threats against school officials or school property, or both.This bill would authorize suspension or recommendation for expulsion if the above-described acts occur during or outside of school hours, provided that, when engaged in outside of the campus, the act is sufficiently severe or pervasive to have the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting classwork, creating substantial disorder, or creating an intimidating or hostile educational environment.Existing law encourages, for a pupil who has been suspended, or for whom other means of correction have been implemented, for an incident of racist bullying, harassment, or intimidation, local educational agencies to have both the victim and perpetrator engage in a restorative justice practice that is found to suit the needs of both the victim and the perpetrator.This bill would specify that an incident of racist bullying, harassment, or intimidation may occur during or outside of school hours provided that the above-described conditions are met.

CA AB 2352 - Jacqui V. Irwin
Behavioral health and psychiatric advance directives.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2352, as amended, Irwin. Behavioral health and psychiatric advance directives. (1) Existing law establishes the requirements for executing a written advance health care directive that is legally sufficient to direct health care decisions. Existing law provides a form that an individual may use or modify to create an advance health care directive. Under existing law, a written advance health care directive is legally sufficient if specified requirements are satisfied, may be revoked by a patient having capacity at any time, and is revoked to the extent of a conflict with a later executed directive. Existing law requires a supervising health care provider who knows of the existence of an advance health care directive or its revocation to record that fact in the patient’s health record. Existing law sets forth requirements of witnesses to a written advance health care directive. A written advance health care directive or similar instrument executed in another jurisdiction is valid and enforceable in this state under existing law. A person who intentionally falsifies, forges, conceals, defaces, or obliterates an individual’s advance health care directive or its revocation without the individual’s consent is subject to liability of up to $10,000 or actual damages, whichever is greater, plus reasonable attorney’s fees.Existing law authorizes an appeal of specified orders relating to an advance health care directive. Existing law generally prohibits involuntary civil placement of a ward, conservatee, or person with capacity in a mental health treatment facility, subject to a valid and effective advance health care directive. Existing law prohibits specified entities, including a provider, health care service plan, or insurer, from requiring or prohibiting the execution or revocation of an advance health care directive as a condition for providing health care, admission to a facility, or furnishing insurance. Existing law requires the Secretary of State to establish a registry system for written advance health care directives, but failure to register does not affect the directive’s validity and registration does not affect a registrant’s ability to revoke the directive.Under existing law, an advance psychiatric directive is a legal document, executed on a voluntary basis by a person who has the capacity to make medical decisions and in accordance with the requirements for an advance health care directive, that allows a person with mental illness to protect their autonomy and ability to direct their own care by documenting their preferences for treatment in advance of a mental health crisis. An individual may execute both an advance health care directive and a voluntary standalone psychiatric advance directive.This bill would extend the above-described advance health care directive provisions to psychiatric advance directives and would make conforming changes. The bill would specify that a psychiatric advance directive is a legal written or digital document, executed as specified, that allows a person with behavioral health illness to document their preferences for treatment and identify a health care advocate in advance of a behavioral health crisis. Under the bill, a written or digital psychiatric advance directive may include the individual’s nomination of a health care advocate who is in agreement to uphold the person’s preferences for treatment in the case of a behavioral health crisis. If the health care advocate is informed of the directive’s revocation, the bill would require them to promptly communicate that fact to the supervising health care provider and any health care institution where the patient is receiving care. The bill would specify that a psychiatric advance directive is legally sufficient if it contains the date of its execution and is signed by the individual, their health care advocate or another adult in the individual’s presence and at the individual’s direction, and one additional, unrelated witness.(2) Exi

CA AB 236 - Christopher R. Holden
Health care coverage: provider directories.
01/13/2023 - Read first time. To print.
AB 236, as introduced, Holden. Health care coverage: provider directories. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan and a health insurer that contracts with providers for alternative rates of payment to publish and maintain a provider directory or directories with information on contracting providers that deliver health care services enrollees or insureds, and requires a health care service plan and health insurer to regularly update its printed and online provider directory or directories, as specified.This bill would require a plan or insurer to annually audit and delete inaccurate listings from its provider directories, and would require a provider directory to be 60% accurate on January 1, 2024, with increasing required percentage accuracy benchmarks to be met each year until the directories are 95% accurate on or before January 1, 2027. The bill would subject a plan or insurer to administrative penalties for failure to meet the prescribed benchmarks and for each inaccurate listing in its directories. If a plan or insurer has not financially compensated a provider in the prior year, the bill would require the plan or insurer to delete the provider from its directory beginning July 1, 2024, unless specified criteria applies. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2360 - Anthony Rendon
Developmental services: family services: counseling.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2360, as amended, Rendon. Developmental services: family services: counseling. Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. In order to provide opportunities for children to live with their families, existing law requires the department and regional centers to give a very high priority to the development and expansion of services and supports designed to assist families that are caring for their children at home, including respite for parents, homemaker services, counseling, and mental health services.This bill would require the department to establish a Family Wellness Pilot Program under which regional centers shall provide counseling and peer support group services to the families of regional center consumers, as specified. The bill would require the department to evaluate the program and submit a report on the evaluation to the Legislature on or before July 1, 2029.

CA AB 2390 - Joaquin Arambula
Social Media Harm Reduction Pilot Program.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on P. & C.P. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on P. & C.P.
AB 2390, as amended, Arambula. Social Media Harm Reduction Pilot Program. Existing law regulates social media platforms, through various acts, including the Cyberbullying Protection Act, that requires a social media platform to, among other things and subject to specified exceptions, disclose all cyberbullying reporting procedures in the terms of service and the Online Violence Prevention Act that requires a social medial platform to, except as specified, clearly and conspicuously state whether it has a mechanism for reporting violent posts that is available to users and nonusers of the platform. Existing law establishes the California Health and Human Services Agency, which includes various state departments charged with the administration of health, social, and other human services.This bill would establish, until December 31, 2029, the Social Media Harm Reduction Pilot Program and would require the California Health and Human Services Agency to designate a nonprofit organization to undertake the responsibilities of the program. The bill would require the program to do various specified tasks, including recommending statewide standards for the use of online social networks by kindergarten and grades 1 to 12 pupils, inclusive, and would require the program to coordinate with existing laws regulating social media platforms to ensure consistency and avoid duplication of effort.

CA AB 2411 - David D. Cortese
Local Youth Mental Health Boards.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2411, as amended, Wendy Carrillo. Local Youth Mental Health Boards. Existing law, the Bronzan-McCorquodale Act, contains provisions governing the operation and financing of community mental health services for the mentally disordered in every county through locally administered and locally controlled community mental health programs. This bill would require each community mental health service to have a local youth mental health board (board), appointed as specified, consisting of members between 15 and 23 years of age, inclusive, at least 1/2 of whom are, to the extent possible, mental health consumers who are receiving, or have received, mental health services, or siblings or close family members of mental health consumers and 1/2 of whom are, to the extent possible, enrolled in schools in the county. The bill would require the board, among other duties, to review and evaluate the local public mental health system and advise the governing body and school district governing bodies on mental health services related to youth that are delivered by the local mental health agency or local behavioral health agency, school districts, or others, as applicable. The bill would require the governing body to include the board in the county planning process and provide a budget for the board sufficient to facilitate the purposes, duties, and responsibilities of the board. By increasing the duties of local governments, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, among other things, establishes the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission. Existing law, the Behavioral Health Services Act (BHSA), approved by the voters as Proposition 1 at the March 5, 2024, statewide primary election, commencing January 1, 2025, revises and recasts the MHSA by, among other things, renaming the commission the Behavioral Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission and changing the duties of the commission to include promoting transformational change in California’s behavioral health system through research, evaluation and tracking outcomes, and other strategies to assess and report progress. This bill would require the commission, on or before December 30, 2027, and once every 5 years thereafter, to assess the extent to which the local youth mental health boards have been established and to make recommendations on ways to strengthen the youth voice to support appropriate behavioral health services. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2442 - Rick Chavez Zbur
Healing arts: expedited licensure process: gender-affirming health care and gender-affirming mental health care.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2442, as amended, Zbur. Healing arts: expedited licensure process: gender-affirming health care and gender-affirming mental health care. Existing law requires the Medical Board of California, the Osteopathic Medical Board of California, the Board of Registered Nursing, and the Physician Assistant Board to expedite the licensure process for an applicant who demonstrates that they intend to provide abortions within the scope of practice of their license, and specifies the manner in which the applicant is required to demonstrate their intent. This bill would also require those boards to expedite the licensure process for an applicant who demonstrates that they intend to provide gender-affirming health care and gender-affirming mental health care, as defined, within the scope of practice of their license, and would specify the manner in which the applicant would be required to demonstrate their intent. The bill would repeal its provisions on January 1, 2029.

CA AB 2446 - Liz Ortega
Medi-Cal: diapers.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2446, as amended, Ortega. Medi-Cal: diapers. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed by, and funded pursuant to, federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law establishes a schedule of covered benefits under the Medi-Cal program, including incontinence supplies.This bill would add to the schedule of Medi-Cal benefits diapers for infants or toddlers with certain conditions, such as a urinary tract infection and colic, among others. The bill would establish diapers as a covered benefit for a child greater than 3 years of age who has been diagnosed with a condition that contributes to incontinence and would establish diapers as a covered benefit for individuals under 21 years of age, if necessary to correct or ameliorate a condition pursuant to specified standards. The bill would require the department to seek any necessary federal approval to implement this section.

CA AB 2466 - Wendy Carrillo
Medi-Cal managed care: network adequacy standards.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2466, as amended, Wendy Carrillo. Medi-Cal managed care: network adequacy standards. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law authorizes the Director of Health Care Services to terminate a contract or impose sanctions if the director finds that a Medi-Cal managed care plan fails to comply with contract requirements, state or federal law or regulations, or the state plan or approved waivers, or for other good cause.Existing law establishes, until January 1, 2026, certain time and distance and appointment time standards for specified Medi-Cal managed care covered services, consistent with federal regulations relating to network adequacy standards, to ensure that those services are available and accessible to enrollees of Medi-Cal managed care plans in a timely manner, as specified.Under this bill, a Medi-Cal managed care plan would be deemed to be not in compliance with the appointment time standards if either (1) fewer than 85% of the network providers had an appointment available within the standards or (2) the department receives information establishing that the plan was unable to deliver timely, available, or accessible health care services to enrollees, as specified. Under the bill, failure to comply with the appointment time standard may result in contract termination or the issuance of sanctions as described above.Existing law requires a Medi-Cal managed care plan to submit a request for alternative access standards if the plan cannot meet the time or distance standards. Under existing law, a plan is not required to submit a previously approved request on an annual basis, unless the plan requires modifications to its request. Existing law requires the plan to submit this previously approved request at least every 3 years for review and approval when the plan is required to demonstrate compliance with time or distance standards.This bill would instead require a plan that has a previously approved alternative access standard to submit a renewal request on an annual basis, explaining which efforts the plan has made in the previous 12 months to mitigate or eliminate circumstances that justify the use of an alternative access standard, as specified. The bill would require the department to consider the reasonableness and effectiveness of the mitigating efforts as part of the renewal decision.Existing law requires a Medi-Cal managed care plan to demonstrate, annually and upon request by the department, how the plan arranged for the delivery of Medi-Cal covered services to Medi-Cal enrollees, with a report measuring compliance, as specified. Existing law requires the department to annually evaluate a plan’s compliance with the standards and to annually publish a report.This bill would, effective for contract periods commencing on or after July 1, 2025, require the plan’s and department’s reports to include certain information and require the department’s evaluation to be performed using a direct testing method, as specified. Under the bill, failure to comply with these provisions may result in contract termination or the issuance of sanctions.Existing law, as part of the federally required external quality review organization (EQRO) review of Medi-Cal managed care plans, requires the EQRO designated by the department to compile certain data, by plan and by county, for the purpose of informing the status of implementation of the above-described standards.This bill would require that the data include, effective for contract periods commencing on or after July 1, 2025, the number of requests for alternative access standards, categorized by new and returning patients, and the number of allowable exceptions for the appointment time standards, categorized by urgent and nonu

CA AB 247 - Lori D. Wilson
Education finance: school facilities: Transitional Kindergarten Through Community College Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2024.
08/21/2023 - In committee: Referred to APPR suspense file.
AB 247, as amended, Muratsuchi. Education finance: school facilities: Transitional Kindergarten Through Community College Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2024. (1) The California Constitution prohibits the Legislature from creating a debt or liability that singly or in the aggregate with any previous debts or liabilities exceeds the sum of $300,000, except by an act that (1) authorizes the debt for a single object or work specified in the act, (2) has been passed by a 2/3 vote of all the Members elected to each house of the Legislature, (3) has been submitted to the people at a statewide general or primary election, and (4) has received a majority of all the votes cast for and against it at that election.This bill would set forth the Transitional Kindergarten Through Community College Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2024 as a state general obligation bond act that would provide $14,000,000,000 to construct and modernize education facilities, as specified. This bond act would become operative only if approved by the voters at an unspecified 2024 statewide election. The bill would also provide for the submission of the bond act to the voters at that election.(2) The Leroy F. Greene School Facilities Act of 1998 provides for the adoption of rules, regulations, and procedures, under the administration of the Director of General Services, for the allocation of state funds by the State Allocation Board for the construction and modernization of public school facilities.This bill would require the Department of General Services to process all applications received under the act on and after an unspecified date and to present those applications to the State Allocation Board within 120 days of receipt. The bill would require a school district that applies for bond funding under the act to supply designated information about the facilities at each school in the school district to the State Department of Education. The bill would amend the methodology for calculating the local contribution a school district is required to make in order to be eligible to receive state funding under the act, as specified.The bill would authorize the allocation of state funds under the act for the replacement of school buildings that are at least 50 years old, for specified assistance to school districts with a school facility located on a military installation, as specified, and small school districts, as defined, and for the testing and remediation of lead levels in water fountains and faucets used for drinking or preparing food on schoolsites, as provided. The bill would authorize new construction and modernization grants to be used for seismic mitigation purposes, certain health and safety projects, and, among other things, to establish schoolsite-based infrastructure to provide broadband internet access. The bill would also authorize modernization grants to be used for the control, management, or abatement of lead. The bill would increase the maximum level of total bonding capacity, as defined, that a school district could have in order to be eligible for financial hardship assistance under the act from $5,000,000 to $15,000,000. The bill, commencing in the 2025–26 fiscal year, would increase that $15,000,000 maximum by a specified inflation adjustment. The bill would authorize the State Allocation Board to provide assistance for purposes of procuring interim housing to school districts and county offices of education impacted by a natural disaster for which the Governor has declared a state of emergency. The bill would also make conforming changes.The bill would make these provisions effective upon the adoption of the Transitional Kindergarten Through Community College Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2024 by the voters at the unspecified 2024 statewide election.

CA AB 2470 - Greg Wallis
Violent felonies: domestic violence.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2470, as amended, Joe Patterson. Violent felonies: domestic violence. Existing law defines the term “violent felony” for various purposes, including, among others, enhancing the punishment for felonies pursuant to existing sentencing provisions commonly known as the three strikes law. The Legislature may directly amend the three strikes law by a statute passed in each house by a 2/3 vote, or by a statute that becomes effective only when approved by the voters.This bill would expand the crimes that are within the definition of a violent felony for all purposes, including for purposes of the three strikes law, to include felony domestic violence, as specified. By expanding the scope of an enhancement, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2475 - Matt Haney
Parole.
04/02/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2475, as amended, Haney. Parole. Existing law requires a prisoner who has a severe mental disorder to be treated by the State Department of State Hospitals as a condition of parole. Existing law specifies the criteria for this parole condition to apply, and allows a prisoner to request a hearing before the Board of Parole Hearings for the purpose of proving that the prisoner meets the criteria. Existing law allows a prisoner who disagrees with the determination of the Board of Parole Hearings to file a petition in court for a hearing on whether they met the criteria. Existing law provides that if the determination of the Board of Parole Hearings is reversed, the court is to stay the execution of the decision for 5 working days to allow for an orderly release of the prisoner.Existing law requires that specified persons released from prison, after serving a prison term for a felony, be subject to postrelease community supervision provided by a county agency for a period not exceeding 3 years immediately following release.This bill would instead provide that if the determination of the Board of Parole Hearings is reversed, the court shall stay the execution of the decision for up to 30 days to allow for an orderly release of the prisoner, as specified.The bill would require that if the determination of the Board of Parole Hearings is reversed, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, upon a determination that the individual is eligible for release pursuant to postrelease community supervision provisions, notify the probation department of the county of supervision of the pending release within 5 working days of the court order and work with the county of supervision to coordinate the orderly and safe release of the prisoner.

CA AB 2478 - James C. Ramos
Incarcerated persons: health records.
03/18/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2478, as introduced, Ramos. Incarcerated persons: health records. Existing law, the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act, prohibits a health care provider, a contractor, or a health care service plan from disclosing medical information, as defined, regarding a patient of the provider or an enrollee or subscriber of the health care service plan without first obtaining an authorization, except as specified. Existing law authorizes, among other things, mental health records to be disclosed by a county correctional facility, county medical facility, state correctional facility, or state hospital, as specified.Existing law requires, when jurisdiction of an inmate is transferred from or between the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, the State Department of State Hospitals, and county agencies caring for inmates, those agencies to disclose, by electronic transmission when possible, mental health records, as defined, regarding each transferred inmate who received mental health services while in custody of the transferring facility, as specified. Existing law requires mental health records to be disclosed to ensure sufficient mental health history is available for the purpose of satisfying specified requirements relating to parole and to ensure the continuity of mental health treatment of an inmate being transferred between those facilities. Existing law requires all transmissions made pursuant to those provisions to comply with specified provisions of state and federal law, including the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act.This bill would require, when jurisdiction of an inmate is transferred from or between a county correctional facility, a county medical facility, the State Department of State Hospitals, and a county agency caring for inmates, those agencies to disclose, by electronic transmission if possible, mental health records, as defined, regarding each transferred inmate who received mental health services while in custody of the transferring facility, as specified. The bill would require mental health records to be disclosed to ensure sufficient mental health history is available to ensure the continuity of mental health treatment of an inmate being transferred between those facilities.This bill would require all county behavioral health departments and contractors to establish and maintain a secure and standardized system for sharing inmate mental health records, as specified. The bill would require each county to prepare a report containing information about the effectiveness of the data sharing, the continuity of care measures, and an evaluation on the impact of inmate well-being, safety, and recidivism rates. The bill would require the report to be submitted to the Legislature on or before June 30, 2028. By imposing additional duties on local entities, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would require all transmissions made pursuant to these provisions to comply with specified provisions of state and federal law, including the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2510 - Joaquin Arambula
Dental care for people with developmental disabilities.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Coms. on HUM. S. and HIGHER ED.
AB 2510, as introduced, Arambula. Dental care for people with developmental disabilities. Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under existing law, the regional centers purchase needed services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities through approved service providers, or arrange for their provision through other publicly funded agencies. The services and supports to be provided to a regional center consumer are contained in an individual program plan (IPP), which is developed by the planning team according to specified procedures. Existing law defines “services and supports for persons with developmental disabilities” to mean specialized services and supports or special adaptations of generic services and supports directed toward the alleviation of a developmental disability or toward the social, personal, physical, or economic habilitation or rehabilitation of an individual with a developmental disability, or toward the achievement and maintenance of an independent, productive, and normal life. Under existing law, specialized medical and dental care are included within that definition. Under existing law, the determination of which services and supports are necessary for each consumer are made through the IPP process.This bill would require the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with California Northstate University (CNU), no later than _____, to establish a statewide program centered in the state’s regional centers, to improve the provision of dental care services to people with developmental and intellectual disabilities, and specifically to prevent or reduce the need for developmental services consumers to receive dental treatment using sedation and general anesthesia. The bill would require the program to establish an Oral Health for People with Disabilities Technical Assistance Center, headquartered at CNU. The bill would require the center, among other responsibilities, to provide practical experience, systems development, and expertise in relevant subject areas, to train, monitor, and provide support for regional center and oral health personnel, and to collect and analyze program data with the support of participating regional centers and oral health providers. The bill would require the department to submit an annual report of the collected data to the Legislature. The bill also would specify regional center duties, including identifying consumers who can benefit from the program, and establishing vendor agreements with interested oral health professionals. Duties of the department would include providing guidance and establishing protocols to support the program, and establish procedures for regional center directors for participation in the program and allowing aggregation and publication by the center of deidentified results data, as specified.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute to facilitate timely, safe, and adequate dental care for individuals with developmental disabilities.

CA AB 252 - Christopher R. Holden
The College Athlete Protection Act.
07/05/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 252, as amended, Holden. The College Athlete Protection Act. The Student Athlete Bill of Rights requires intercollegiate athletic programs at 4-year private universities or campuses of the University of California or the California State University that receive, as an average, $10,000,000 or more in annual income derived from media rights for intercollegiate athletics to comply with prescribed requirements relating to student athlete rights. Existing law authorizes an institution of higher education, as defined, to establish a degree completion fund, in accordance with applicable rules and bylaws. Existing law requires an institution of higher education to post in a conspicuous location in its athletic department that is frequented by student athletes a notice detailing certain student athlete rights. Existing law prohibits an institution of higher education from intentionally retaliating against a student athlete for making or filing a complaint about, testifying or otherwise assisting in any investigation into, or opposing any practice that the student athlete believes is, a violation of student athlete rights.This bill would establish the College Athlete Protection (CAP) Act for purposes of providing various rights, benefits, and protections to college athletes. The bill instead would require certain institutions of higher education to establish a degree completion fund for its college athletes, as provided. The bill instead would require an institution of higher education to distribute to each college athlete a notice containing college athlete rights and would require the institution to post this notice in a conspicuous location frequented by college athletes, as specified. The bill instead would prohibit an institution of higher education, and its employees, coaches, and affiliated medical personnel, as defined, from retaliating against a college athlete for filing a complaint or reporting a violation of a college athlete’s rights under the CAP Act. By imposing new duties on community college districts, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would establish the College Athlete Protection (CAP) Program as a program in the Office of Planning and Research for purposes of the CAP Act. The bill would establish a 21-member CAP Panel comprised of appointed individuals to serve on 4 CAP Subpanels, as specified, for the administration of the CAP Act, as provided. The bill would establish the California Athlete Protection Fund under the administration of the CAP Panel, with moneys in the fund appropriated to the CAP Panel, upon appropriation of the Legislature, for purposes of the CAP Act, as provided.This bill would make its provisions severable.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2526 - Michael A. Gipson
Nurse anesthetists.
04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & P.
AB 2526, as amended, Gipson. Nurse anesthetists. Existing law, the Nurse Anesthetists Act, provides for the certification and regulation of nurse anesthetists by the Board of Registered Nursing within the Department of Consumer Affairs. If a general anesthetic agent is administered in a dental office, existing law requires the dentist to hold a permit authorized by the provisions governing a dentist’s use of deep sedation and general anesthesia. Existing law provides that nothing under the act is to be construed to limit a certified nurse anesthetist’s ability to practice nursing.This bill would delete the above-described requirement that a dentist hold a specified permit if a general anesthetic agent is administered in a dental office and would instead prescribe specified circumstances in which general anesthesia or deep sedation is to be administered in a dental office by a nurse anesthetist.This bill would also provide that a certified registered nurse anesthetist who is licensed under the act and is registered with the federal Drug Enforcement Agency has prescriptive authority to select, order, or administer prescription drugs, as defined, upon a request issued by a dentist as specified. The bill would authorize a nurse anesthetist to prescribe prescription drugs only for an individual whom the nurse anesthetist has established a client or patient record at the time of the prescription. The bill would require a nurse anesthetist to complete training set forth by the agency upon registration or renewal of registration with the agency. The bill would provide that nothing under the Nursing Practice Act affects the authority of a licensed nurse anesthetist to select, order, or administer prescription drugs for the delivery of perioperative anesthesia services beyond the outpatient dental setting.Existing law, the Dental Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of dentists by the Dental Board of California within the Department of Consumer Affairs. Existing law authorizes a licensed physician and surgeon to administer deep sedation or general anesthesia in the office of a licensed dentist for dental patients if specified conditions are met, including that they hold a valid general anesthesia permit issued by the board as prescribed.This bill would authorize a certified registered nurse anesthetist to administer general anesthesia or deep sedation in the office of a licensed dentist for dental patients if specified conditions are met, including that they hold a valid general anesthesia permit issued by the board as prescribed. To obtain that permit, the bill would require a nurse anesthetist to apply to the board on an application form prescribed by the board and to submit, among other things, payment of an application fee. Prior to issuance or renewal of a permit pursuant to these provisions, the bill authorizes the board to require an onsite inspection and evaluation of the facility, equipment, and personnel, as specified. If a nurse anesthetist fails an onsite inspection and evaluation, the bill would require their permit be automatically suspended for 30 days, as specified. The bill would authorize a nurse anesthetist who additionally meets certain requirements to apply to the board for a pediatric endorsement to provide general anesthesia or deep sedation to a child under 7 years of age.By expanding the scope of existing crimes under the Nurse Anesthetists Act and the Dental Practice Act, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2527 - Rebecca Bauer-Kahan
Incarceration: pregnant persons.
04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 2527, as amended, Bauer-Kahan. Incarceration: pregnant persons. Existing law requires an incarcerated person in a state prison or county jail who is identified as possibly pregnant or capable of becoming pregnant during an intake health examination or at any time during incarceration to be offered a pregnancy test upon intake or request. Existing law requires an incarcerated person who is confirmed to be pregnant to be scheduled for pregnancy examination with a physician, nurse practitioner, certified nurse midwife, or physician assistant within 7 days. Existing law requires incarcerated pregnant persons to be provided with access to, among other things, prenatal vitamins. Existing law prohibits incarcerated pregnant persons from being tased, pepper sprayed, or exposed to other chemical weapons.This bill would additionally require incarcerated pregnant persons to be provided with free and clean bottled water and daily high-quality and high caloric nutritional meals, as specified. The bill would also prohibit incarcerated pregnant persons from being placed in solitary confinement or restrictive housing units during their pregnancy or for 12 weeks postpartum.Existing law, for a pregnant person incarcerated in the state prison, requires that person to be provided access to community-based programs serving pregnant, birthing, or lactating incarcerated persons, and authorizes that person to elect to have a support person present during labor, childbirth, and during postpartum recovery while hospitalized. Existing law requires, if that person’s request for access to community-based programs or a support person is denied, the reason for the denial to be provided in writing to the incarcerated person within 15 working days of receipt of the request.This bill would require the reasons for that denial to be provided in writing to the incarcerated person within 2 working days of receipt of the request, and would extend these requirements to county jails.This bill would additionally extend the requirements on county jails to detention facilities generally, and would define detention facilities as including any city, county, or regional facility used for the confinement of any person, including those under 18 years of age, for more than 24 hours. By imposing additional duties on local governments, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 254 - Laura Friedman
Confidentiality of Medical Information Act: reproductive or sexual health application information.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 254, Bauer-Kahan. Confidentiality of Medical Information Act: reproductive or sexual health application information. The Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (CMIA) prohibits a provider of health care, a health care service plan, a contractor, or a corporation and its subsidiaries and affiliates from intentionally sharing, selling, using for marketing, or otherwise using any medical information, as defined, for any purpose not necessary to provide health care services to a patient, except as provided. The CMIA makes a business that offers software or hardware to consumers, including a mobile application or other related device that is designed to maintain medical information in order to make the information available to an individual or a provider of health care at the request of the individual or a provider of health care, for purposes of allowing the individual to manage the individual’s information or for the diagnosis, treatment, or management of a medical condition of the individual, a provider of health care subject to the requirements of the CMIA. Existing law makes a violation of these provisions that results in economic loss or personal injury to a patient punishable as a misdemeanor.This bill would revise the definition of “medical information” to include reproductive or sexual health application information, which the bill would define to mean information about a consumer’s reproductive or sexual health collected by a reproductive or sexual health digital service, as specified. The bill would make a business that offers a reproductive or sexual health digital service to a consumer for the purpose of allowing the individual to manage the individual’s information, or for the diagnosis, treatment, or management of a medical condition of the individual, a provider of health care subject to the requirements of the CMIA. Because the bill would expand the scope of a crime, it would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 56.05 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 1697 to be operative only if this bill and AB 1697 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2541 - Jasmeet Bains
Peace officer training: wandering.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass. To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 14. Noes 0.) (April 10).
AB 2541, as introduced, Bains. Peace officer training: wandering. Existing law requires specified categories of law enforcement officers to meet training standards pursuant to courses of training certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Existing law requires POST to include in its basic training course adequate instruction in the handling of persons with developmental disabilities or mental illness, or both.This bill would require the commission, in consultation with specified subject matter experts and on or before January 1, 2026, to develop guidelines addressing wandering associated with Alzheimer’s disease, autism, and dementia, as specified.

CA AB 2547 - Tri Ta
Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2547, as amended, Ta. Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial. Existing law prohibits a person from being tried or adjudged to punishment while that person is mentally incompetent. Existing law establishes a process by which a defendant’s mental competency is evaluated and if the defendant is found incompetent to stand trial, the proceedings are suspended while the defendant receives treatment, with the goal of restoring the defendant to competency.Existing law, in the case of a misdemeanor charge in which the defendant is found incompetent, requires the court to either dismiss the case or hold a hearing to determine if the defendant is eligible for diversion. Under existing law, if the defendant not eligible for diversion, the court may hold another hearing to decide if the defendant should be referred for outpatient treatment, conservatorship, or the Community Assistance, Recovery, and Empowerment (CARE) program, or if the defendant’s treatment plan should be modified.This bill would remove the option for the court to dismiss the case and would instead require the court to hold a hearing to determine if the defendant is eligible for diversion. If the defendant is not eligible for diversion, the bill would require the court to hold a hearing to determine whether the defendant will be referred to outpatient treatment, conservatorship, or the CARE program, or if the defendant’s treatment plan will be modified. The bill would authorize a party to request and a court to order a re-evaluation of the defendant’s competency during the pendency of these proceedings.

CA AB 2549 - James M. Gallagher
Patient visitation.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on HUM. S. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 16. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2549, as amended, Gallagher. Patient visitation. Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation by the State Department of Public Health of health facilities, as defined. Existing law requires a health facility to allow a patient’s domestic partner, the children of the patient’s domestic partner, and the domestic partner of the patient’s parent or child to visit unless no visitors are allowed, the facility reasonably determines that the presence of a particular visitor would endanger the health or safety of a patient, member of the health facility staff, or other visitor to the health facility, or would significantly disrupt the operations of a facility, or the patient has indicated to the health facility staff that the patient does not want this person to visit. A violation of this provision is a misdemeanor.This bill would require a health facility to allow specified persons to visit, including the patient’s children and grandparents. The bill would require the health facility to develop alternate visitation protocols, if circumstances require the health facility to restrict visitor access to the facility due to health or safety concerns, that allow visitation to the greatest extent possible while maintaining patient, visitor, and staff health and safety. Notwithstanding the requirement mentioned above, the bill would prohibit a health facility from prohibiting in-person visitation in end-of-life situations unless the patient has indicated to the health facility staff that the patient does not want this person to visit. By expanding an existing crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would require the State Department of Public Health to, no later than January 1, 2026, provide specific clinical guidance related to safe visitation during a pandemic event for hospitals. The bill would, among other things, prohibit the guidance provided from including a prohibition on visitation rights, and requires the guidance to explicitly consider the potential negative impacts of restrictive visitation policies on patient well-being, mental health, and the overall quality of care.This bill would require all hospitals to adopt visitation policies in compliance with the department’s guidance no later than July 1, 2026.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2556 - Corey A. Jackson
Behavioral health and wellness screenings: notice.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2556, as amended, Jackson. Behavioral health and wellness screenings: notice. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. This bill would require a health care service plan or insurer to provide to each legal guardian of a patient, enrollee, or insured, 10 to 18 years of age, a written or electronic notice regarding the benefits of a behavioral health and wellness screening, as defined. The bill would require a health care service plan or insurer to provide the notice on an annual basis. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements relative to a health care service plan would be crimes, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 257 - Joshua Hoover
Encampments: penalties.
01/03/2024 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. Read second time and amended.
AB 257, as amended, Hoover. Encampments: penalties. Under existing law, a person who lodges in a public or private place without permission is guilty of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. Existing law also provides that a person who willfully and maliciously obstructs the free movement of any person on any street, sidewalk, or other public place is guilty of a misdemeanor.This bill would prohibit a person from camping, as defined, in a street, sidewalk, or other public property within 500 feet of a school. The bill would authorize a city attorney, county counsel, or district attorney to bring an action for a violation of this prohibition. The bill would make a person who violates this prohibition liable for a civil fine of not more than $10 in an action brought by the city attorney of the city or the county counsel or the district attorney of the county where the violation occurred.

CA AB 2574 - Avelino Valencia
Alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2574, as introduced, Valencia. Alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities. Existing law declares that it is the policy of the state that each county and city shall permit and encourage the development of sufficient numbers and types of alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities as are commensurate with local need. Existing law requires an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility that serves 6 or fewer persons to be considered a residential use of property for the purposes of local regulations, regardless of whether or not unrelated persons are living together.This bill would exempt an unlicensed home for persons recovering from alcoholism or drug abuse in a neighborhood zoned for residential use from being considered a residential use of property when specified evidence demonstrates that the facility is an integral part of a licensed drug treatment facility located elsewhere.

CA AB 2576 - Stephanie Nguyen
Diversion: attempted murder.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2576, as introduced, Stephanie Nguyen. Diversion: attempted murder. Existing law authorizes a court to grant pretrial diversion to a defendant suffering from a mental disorder, on an accusatory pleading alleging the commission of a misdemeanor or felony offense, in order to allow the defendant to undergo mental health treatment. Existing law prohibits defendants charged with specified offenses, including murder, from being placed in this diversion program.This bill would add attempted murder to the list of charged offenses that prohibit a defendant from being placed in this diversion program.

CA AB 2581 - Brian K. Maienschein
Healing arts: continuing education: maternal mental health.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2581, as amended, Maienschein. Healing arts: continuing education: maternal mental health. Existing law, the Nursing Practice Act, establishes the Board of Registered Nursing and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of the practice of nursing. Existing law, the Psychology Licensing Law, establishes the Board of Psychology and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of psychologists. Existing law, the Physician Assistant Practice Act, establishes the Physician Assistant Board and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of physician assistants.Existing law, the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Act, the Clinical Social Worker Practice Act, the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act, and the Educational Psychologist Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of the practices of marriage and family therapy, clinical social work, professional clinical counseling, and education psychology, respectively, by the Board of Behavioral Sciences.Existing law establishes continuing education requirements for all of these various healing arts practitioners.This bill would require the above-specified boards, in determining their continuing education requirements, to consider including a course in maternal mental health.

CA AB 2621 - Jesse Gabriel
Law enforcement training.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2621, as amended, Gabriel. Law enforcement training. Existing law defines a “hate crime” as a criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of actual or perceived characteristics of the victim, including, among other things, race, religion, disability, and sexual orientation. Existing law requires the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, in consultation with specified subject-matter experts, to develop a course of instruction that trains law enforcement on, among other things, indicators of hate crimes and techniques, responses to hate crime waves against certain groups, including Arab and Islamic communities, and methods to handle incidents of hate crimes in a noncombative manner.This bill would require instruction to include identifying when a gun violence restraining order is appropriate to prevent a hate crime and the procedure for seeking a gun violence restraining order. The bill would additionally require instruction on responses to hate crime waves against specified groups, including the LGBTQ and Jewish communities.Existing law allows a court to issue a gun violence restraining order prohibiting and enjoining a named person from having custody or control of any firearms or ammunition if the person poses a significant danger of causing personal injury to themselves or another by having custody or control of a firearm or ammunition. Existing law establishes a civil restraining order process to accomplish that purpose, including authorizing the issuance of an ex parte order, as specified.Existing law requires specified law enforcement agencies to develop, adopt, and implement policies and standards relating to gun violence restraining orders. Existing law requires these policies to include, among other things, standards and procedures for requesting and serving an ex parte gun violence restraining order or procedures on the responsibility of officers to attend gun violence restraining order hearings.This bill would revise the above-described policies and standards to include, among other things, an officer’s obligation to diligently participate in the evidence presentation process at hearings and the procedure for storing firearms surrendered in compliance with a gun violence restraining order. The bill would require law enforcement agencies, as specified, to make information about the standards and policies available to all officers. By imposing additional duties on local agencies, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2629 - Matt Haney
Firearms: prohibited persons.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2629, as amended, Haney. Firearms: prohibited persons. Existing law prohibits certain persons who have been the subject of specified mental health determinations, including having been placed under conservatorship by a court, having been found mentally incompetent to stand trial, having been found not guilty of specified crimes due to reason of insanity, having been adjudicated by a court to be a danger to others as a result of a mental disorder or mental illness, or having been adjudicated to be a mentally disordered sex offender, from possessing or receiving a firearm, as specified.Existing law removes this prohibition from a person who was found mentally incompetent to stand trial but is subsequently restored to competence, as specified.This bill would specify that this prohibition also applies to persons found mentally incompetent to stand trial in a misdemeanor proceeding or in postrelease community supervision or parole revocation hearing.The bill would also allow a person who has had a misdemeanor charge dismissed due to their mental incompetence to subsequently petition the court for a restoration of competence and would authorize the court, upon receiving such a petition, to appoint a psychologist or psychiatrist to evaluate the person. The bill would require the court, if the psychologist or psychiatrist finds that the person has regained competence, to notify the Department of Justice to remove the prohibition on the person from possessing or receiving a firearm.

CA AB 2636 - Jasmeet Bains
Mello-Granlund Older Californians Act.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on AGING & L.T.C.
AB 2636, as amended, Bains. Mello-Granlund Older Californians Act. Existing law requires the California Department of Aging to administer the Mello-Granlund Older Californians Act (act), which establishes various programs that serve older individuals, defined as persons 60 years of age or older, except as specified. The act requires the department to designate various private nonprofit or public agencies as area agencies on aging to work within a planning and service area and provide a broad array of social and nutritional services. Under the act, the department’s mission is to provide leadership to those agencies in developing systems of home- and community-based services that maintain individuals in their own homes or least restrictive homelike environments.This bill would recast and revise various provisions of the act, including updating findings and declarations relating to statistics and issues of concern to the older adult population, and replacing references throughout the act from “senior,” and similar terminology to “older adult.” The bill would increase flexibility for area agencies on aging to develop and manage community-based program based on local need, as specified. The bill would repeal obsolete provisions, such as the Senior Center Bond Act of 1984.Existing law requires the California Department of Aging to maintain a clearinghouse of information related to the interests and needs of older individuals and provide referral services, if appropriate. Existing law establishes the Senior Housing Information and Support Center within the deparment to serve as a clearinghouse for information for seniors and their families regarding available innovative resources and senior services, subject to appropriation for these purposes.This bill, instead, would require the department to partner with other state departments, the area agencies on aging, and other stakeholders in developing and maintaining an electronic clearinghouse of information of available statewide services and supports for older adults and people with disabilities and providing referral services, if appropriate, and would repeal the provisions establishing the Senior Housing Information and Support Center.

CA AB 2637 - Pilar Schiavo
Health Facilities Financing Authority Act.
03/26/2024 - In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
AB 2637, as introduced, Schiavo. Health Facilities Financing Authority Act. The California Health Facilities Financing Authority Act authorizes the California Health Facilities Financing Authority to, among other things, make loans from the continuously appropriated California Health Facilities Financing Authority Fund to participating health institutions for financing or refinancing the acquisition, construction, or remodeling of health facilities. Under existing law, participating health institutions are specified entities authorized by state law to provide or operate a health facility and undertake the financing or refinancing of the construction or acquisition of a project or of working capital, as defined. Existing law defines “working capital” as moneys to be used by, or on behalf of, a participating health institution for specified expenses in connection with the ownership or operation of a health facility, including interest not to exceed two years on any loan for working capital made pursuant to these provisions. Existing law requires a participating health institution that is a private nonprofit corporation or association and that borrows money to finance working capital to repay and discharge the loan within 24 months of the loan date.This bill would change the definition of “working capital” to remove the 2-year cap on interest on any loan for working capital. The bill would delete the provision requiring a participating health institution that is a private nonprofit corporation or association to repay and discharge a loan for working capital within 24 months.By expanding the purpose for which the above-described continuously appropriated fund may be used, the bill would make an appropriation from that fund. The bill would make legislative findings relating to the purpose of the bill.

CA AB 2643 - Jim Wood
Cannabis cultivation: environmental remediation.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on W., P., & W.
AB 2643, as amended, Wood. Cannabis cultivation: environmental remediation. (1) Existing law requires the Department of Fish and Wildlife to establish the watershed enforcement program to facilitate the investigation, enforcement, and prosecution of offenses relating to unlawful water diversions and other violations of the Fish and Game Code associated with cannabis cultivation. Existing law also requires the department, in coordination with specified state agencies, to establish a permanent multiagency task force to address the environmental impacts of cannabis cultivation.This bill would require the department to conduct a study to create a framework for cannabis site restoration with the goal of providing guidance for the cleanup, remediation, and restoration of environmental damage caused by cannabis cultivation, and to complete the study by January 1, 2027, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to enter into an agreement with a nongovernmental organization or educational institution for that entity to conduct the study.The bill would require the department to submit an annual report to the Legislature until January 1, 2030, on illicit cannabis cultivation on public lands, as specified.(2) Existing law imposes various civil penalties for violations of specified environmental laws in connection with the production or cultivation of a controlled substance, as specified. Existing law defines controlled substance for this purpose to include Schedule I substances, which include, among other substances, heroin, peyote, and cannabis.This bill, with regard to the above-described civil penalties, would replace the term “controlled substance” with the term “cannabis or cannabis products.” (3) Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative measure, as additionally amended by statute, establishes the California Cannabis Tax Fund as a continuously appropriated fund consisting of specified taxes, interest, penalties, and other amounts related to commercial cannabis activity. Each fiscal year, AUMA requires the Controller to make disbursements from the fund pursuant to a specified schedule, including, among others, amounts to the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account. Of the amount deposited into the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account, AUMA requires the Controller to disburse the funds to the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Parks and Recreation for, among other things, the cleanup, remediation, and restoration of environmental damage in watersheds affected by cannabis cultivation and related activities, as specified, and to support local partnerships for this purpose. AUMA authorizes those departments to distribute a portion of the funds they receive from the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account through grants for those purposes.This bill would specify that those grants may include grants to local jurisdictions for cleanup, remediation, and restoration of sites affected by cannabis cultivation and related activities that have been abandoned and seized by that local jurisdiction.(4) The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of an environmental impact report on a project that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. CEQA also requires a lead agency to prepare a mitigated negative declaration for a project that may have a significant effect on the environment if revisions in the project would avoid or mitigate that effect and there is no substantial evidence that the project, as revised, would have a significant effect on the environment. Existing law, until January 1, 2025, exempts from CEQA projects that conserve, restore, protect, or enhance, and assist in the recovery of Calif

CA AB 2650 - Rick Chavez Zbur
Licensed adult residential facilities and residential care facilities for the elderly: data collection.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on HEALTH. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2650, as amended, Zbur. Licensed adult residential facilities and residential care facilities for the elderly: data collection. The California Community Care Facilities Act provides for the licensure and regulation of community care facilities by the State Department of Social Services, including various adult residential facilities, as described. The act includes legislative findings and declarations that there is an urgent need to establish a coordinated and comprehensive statewide service of quality community care for persons with a mental illness, persons with developmental and physical disabilities, and children and adults who require care or services. A person who violates the California Community Care Facilities Act is guilty of a misdemeanor. Existing law, the California Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly, as defined, by the department and expresses the intent of the Legislature to require that those facilities be licensed as a separate category within the existing licensing structure of the department.Existing law requires the department to collect information and send a report to each county’s department of mental health or behavioral health, beginning May 1, 2021, and annually thereafter, of all licensed adult residential facilities and residential care facilities for the elderly, as described, that accept a specified federal rate and accept residents with a serious mental disorder, as defined, and the number of licensed beds at each facility.This bill would require the department, beginning May 1, 2026, and annually thereafter until January 1, 2029, to collect information and send a report to each county’s department of mental health or behavioral health of all licensed adult residential facilities and residential care facilities for the elderly, as described, that accept the above-described specified federal rate and accept residents with a serious mental disorder, as defined, and the number of licensed beds at each facility. The bill would also require the department to collect additional information, including the total number of residents occupying beds at licensed adult residential facilities and residential care facilities for the elderly who are a public benefits recipient, as defined, or a person diagnosed with a serious mental illness, as defined, who is currently receiving regional center funding or who has a previous history of homelessness, incarceration, or institutionalization. The bill would require the department to post the report on its internet website. Because a violation of the California Community Care Facilities Act is crime, the bill would create new crimes, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2657 - Joaquin Arambula
Social Media Commission.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on P. & C.P. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on P. & C.P.
AB 2657, as amended, Arambula. Social Media Commission. Existing law regulates social media platforms, through various acts, including the Cyberbullying Protection Act, which requires a social media platform to, among other things and subject to specified exceptions, disclose all cyberbullying reporting procedures in the terms of service, and the Online Violence Prevention Act, which requires a social medial platform to, except as specified, clearly and conspicuously state whether it has a mechanism for reporting violent posts that is available to users and nonusers of the platform. This bill would establish the Social Media Commission for the purpose of bringing together a diverse group of experts and invested stakeholders to provide a comprehensive report with formal recommendations for regulation of social media as it relates to child and adolescent mental health and well-being. The bill would require the Secretary of California Health and Human Services, or the secretary’s designee, to chair the commission. The bill would require that the commission be composed of 7 subcommittees, including among others, a subcommittee of parents, a subcommittee of adolescents, a subcommittee of educators, and subcommittees of researchers and subject matter experts, as specified. This bill would request the University of California to send an informational briefing to committee members containing, among other things, a review of research on the outcomes of enacted legislation on adolescent social media use and mental health. The bill would require the commission to meet for the first time on or before March 30, 2025. The bill would require the commission to submit its report to the Legislature and the Governor on or before April 1, 2026.

CA AB 2670 - Christopher R. Holden
Awareness campaign: abortion services.
04/11/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2670, as amended,  Schiavo. Awareness campaign: abortion services. Under existing law, the State Department of Public Health is responsible for the statewide administration of various programs and policies relating to personal health, including maternal, child, and adolescent health. Existing law requires the department to develop a coordinated state strategy for addressing the health-related needs of women, including implementation of goals and objectives for women’s health, as specified.This bill would require the department to develop an awareness campaign to publicize the internet website “abortion.ca.gov” to the general public, health care providers, health care professional associations and societies, health care employers, and local public health officers and health departments. The bill would require the department to implement the awareness campaign upon an appropriation by the Legislature for that purpose.

CA AB 268 - Toni G. Atkins
Board of State and Community Corrections.
10/04/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 298, Statutes of 2023.
AB 268, Weber. Board of State and Community Corrections. Existing law establishes and regulates the state prison for the confinement of persons convicted of certain felony offenses. Existing law also regulates county jails used for the confinement of persons awaiting trial and persons convicted of misdemeanors and certain felony offenses.Existing law establishes the Board of State and Community Corrections to provide statewide leadership, coordination, and technical assistance to promote effective state and local efforts and partnerships in California’s adult and juvenile criminal justice system. The duties of the board, among others, include establishing standards for local correctional facilities and correctional officers.Under existing law, the board is composed of 13 members, as specified.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2024, add 2 additional members to the board, a licensed health care provider and a licensed mental or behavioral health care provider, appointed by the Governor and subject to confirmation by the Senate.The bill would also, commencing July 1, 2024, require the board to develop and adopt regulations pertaining to standards of care for incarcerated persons with mental health issues by local correctional facilities, including requirements for training of correctional staff, requirements for mental health screening, and requirements for safety checks of incarcerated persons.

CA AB 2692 - Diane Papan
Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2692, as introduced, Papan. Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial. Existing law prohibits a person from being tried or adjudged to punishment while that person is mentally incompetent. Existing law, in the case of a defendant charged with a felony, requires that, upon a finding of mental incompetence, the proceedings be suspended until the defendant regains competence. Existing law establishes the process by which, if the mental competency of a defendant is in doubt, the defendant’s mental competency is evaluated and the defendant receives treatment with the goal of returning the defendant to competency. Existing law prescribes a program of pretrial diversion for defendants with a diagnosed mental disorder whose disorder was a significant factor in the commission of their offense. Under existing law, persons charged with certain offenses, including murder, rape, sexual abuse of a child, and possession of a weapon of mass destruction, are ineligible for diversion.This bill would specify that the diversion period for an incompetent defendant commences when the defendant is admitted to receive treatment, as specified.

CA AB 27 - Tri Ta
Sentencing: firearms enhancements.
02/14/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Failed passage.
AB 27, as introduced, Ta. Sentencing: firearms enhancements. Existing law generally authorizes a court to dismiss an action or to strike or dismiss an enhancement in the furtherance of justice. Existing law requires a court to dismiss an enhancement if it is in the furtherance of justice to do so, except if dismissal of that enhancement is prohibited by any initiative statute. This bill would also prohibit a court from dismissing a firearms-related enhancement, as defined.

CA AB 2700 - Jesse Gabriel
Emergency medical services: alternate destinations.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2700, as amended, Gabriel. Emergency medical services: alternate destinations. Existing law authorizes a county to develop an emergency medical services (EMS) program, and requires a county developing that program to designate a local EMS agency. Existing law authorizes a local EMS agency to develop a community paramedicine or triage to alternate destination program that, among other things, selects providers to triage individuals to mental health facilities and sobering centers as alternates to emergency departments. Existing law requires the Emergency Medical Services Authority to develop and, after approval by the Commission on Emergency Medical Services, adopt regulations and establish minimum standards for the development of those programs.This bill would require the state to survey and analyze the facilities in each county that can serve as an alternate destination facility. The bill would require a local emergency medical services agency to develop an alternate destination facility plan with protocols for transporting an individual to an alternate destination facility instead of an emergency department.

CA AB 2703 - Cecilia M. Aguiar-Curry
Federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics: psychological associates.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2703, as introduced, Aguiar-Curry. Federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics: psychological associates. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services, including federally qualified health center (FQHC) services and rural health clinic (RHC) services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law requires the department to seek any necessary federal approvals and issue appropriate guidance to allow an FQHC or RHC to bill, under a supervising licensed behavioral health practitioner, for an encounter between an FQHC or RHC patient and an associate clinical social worker or associate marriage and family therapist when certain conditions are met, including, among others, that the FQHC or RHC is otherwise authorized to bill for services provided by the supervising practitioner as a separate visit.This bill would add a psychological associate to those provisions, requiring the department to seek any necessary federal approvals and issue appropriate guidance to allow an FQHC or RHC to bill for an encounter between a patient and a psychological associate under those conditions. The bill would make conforming changes with regard to supervision by a licensed psychologist as required by the Board of Psychology.

CA AB 271 - Josh Newman
Homeless death review committees.
08/14/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 77. Noes 0.).
AB 271, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Homeless death review committees. Existing law authorizes counties to establish interagency child death teams and elder death teams to assist local agencies in identifying and reviewing suspicious deaths and facilitating communications between local organizations for the purposes of reducing the incidence of abuse and neglect.This bill would authorize counties to establish a homeless death review committee for the purposes of gathering information to identify the root causes of death of homeless individuals and to determine strategies to improve coordination of services for the homeless population. The bill would establish procedures for the sharing or disclosure of specified information by a homeless death review committee.

CA AB 2711 - James C. Ramos
Suspensions and expulsions: controlled substances: tobacco: alcohol: plans and protocols.
03/22/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 2711, as introduced, Ramos. Suspensions and expulsions: controlled substances: tobacco: alcohol: plans and protocols. Existing law prohibits a pupil from being suspended from school or recommended for expulsion, unless the superintendent of the school district or the principal of the school in which the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil has committed a specified act, including, among other acts, that the pupil (1) unlawfully possessed, used, sold, or otherwise furnished, or had been under the influence of, a controlled substance, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind, or (2) possessed or used tobacco, or products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, and betel.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, remove unlawfully possessing, using, or being under the influence of a controlled substance, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind from the list of acts for which a pupil, regardless of their grade of enrollment, may be suspended or recommended for expulsion for. The bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, prohibit a charter school pupil in kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, from being suspended or recommended for expulsion solely on the basis of those acts.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, remove having possessed or used tobacco, or products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, and betel from the list of acts for which a pupil, regardless of their grade of enrollment, may be suspended or recommended for expulsion for. The bill would, commencing July 1, 2026, prohibit a charter school pupil in kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, from being suspended or recommended for expulsion solely on the basis of those acts.The bill would require school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to adopt, on or before July 1, 2026, a plan to address pupils who possess or use tobacco, a controlled substance, or alcohol on school property. The bill would require the plan to be youth informed, include specific information on where on campus and in the community pupils can receive education, treatment, or support for substance use, and to require specified protocols after an incident involving a pupil using or in possession of tobacco, a controlled substance, or alcohol on school property occurs, as provided. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would also make Legislative findings and declarations relating to these provisions, make conforming changes, and delete obsolete provisions.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2753 - Liz Ortega
Rehabilitative and habilitative services: durable medical equipment and services.
02/16/2024 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 2753, as introduced, Ortega. Rehabilitative and habilitative services: durable medical equipment and services. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, requires the Department of Managed Health Care to license and regulate health care service plans and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Other existing law requires the Department of Insurance to regulate health insurers. Existing law requires an individual or small group health care service plan contract or health insurance policy issued, amended, or renewed on or after January 1, 2017, to include, at a minimum, coverage for essential health benefits pursuant to the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Under existing law, essential health benefits include, among other things, rehabilitative and habilitative services. Existing law requires habilitative services and devices to be covered under the same terms and conditions applied to rehabilitative services and devices under the plan contract or policy, and defines habilitative services to mean health care services and devices that help a person keep, learn, or improve skills and functioning for daily living.This bill would specify that coverage of rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices under a health care service plan or health insurance policy includes durable medical equipment, services, and repairs, if the equipment, services, or repairs are prescribed or ordered by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional acting within the scope of their license. The bill would define “durable medical equipment” to mean devices, including replacement devices, that are designed for repeated use, and that are used for the treatment or monitoring of a medical condition or injury in order to help a person to partially or fully acquire, improve, keep, or learn, or minimize the loss of, skills and functioning of daily living. The bill would prohibit coverage of durable medical equipment and services from being subject to financial or treatment limitations, as specified.The bill would make related findings and declarations, including that coverage of durable medical equipment is necessary to comply with federal requirements for purposes of being considered essential health benefits not subject to defrayal payments. Because a violation of the bill’s provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2759 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
Domestic violence protective orders: possession of a firearm.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended. Ordered returned to second reading.
AB 2759, as amended, Petrie-Norris. Domestic violence protective orders: possession of a firearm. Existing law prohibits a person subject to a protective order, as defined, from owning, possessing, purchasing, or receiving a firearm or ammunition while that protective order is in effect and makes a willful and knowing violation of a protective order a crime. Existing law requires the court, when issuing the order with both parties present, to inform the parties of this information and to order the restrained person to relinquish any firearm or ammunition in the person’s immediate possession or control or subject to their immediate possession or control. Existing law specifies the means of relinquishment if the law enforcement officer serving the protective order does not request the immediate surrender of the firearm or ammunition, including, surrender to law enforcement, or by selling the firearm or ammunition to a licensed gun dealer.Existing law requires a court to order the restrained person to relinquish firearms or ammunition and to notify the parties of how any firearms or ammunition still in the restrained party’s possession are to be relinquished and how to submit a receipt to the court. Existing law authorizes the court to grant an exemption from the relinquishment order for a particular firearm or ammunition if the respondent can show that the firearm or ammunition is a necessary condition of continued employment and the person cannot be reassigned, as specified, and only authorizes possession on the job or traveling to and from employment. If the person is a peace officer who carries a firearm or ammunition as a condition of employment and the peace officer’s personal safety depends on the ability to carry a firearm or ammunition, the court may exempt them from the relinquishment order, on duty or off, if the court finds that the peace officer does not pose a threat of harm. Existing law requires, prior to making this finding, that the court require a mandatory psychological evaluation of the peace officer and authorizes the court to require the peace officer to enter into counseling or other remedial treatment program to deal with any propensity for domestic violence.This bill would revise the peace officer exemption to authorize a court to allow a peace officer to carry a specific firearm, ammunition, or firearm and ammunition if the peace officer is required, as a condition of continued employment, to carry that firearm, ammunition, or firearm and ammunition, as specified, if they cannot be reassigned, and if the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence, in writing or on the record, that the peace officer’s personal safety depends on the ability to carry that specific firearm, ammunition, or firearm and ammunition outside of scheduled work hours and they do not pose an additional threat of harm to a protected party or the public, as specified. The bill would require the mandatory psychological evaluation of the peace officer to be conducted by a mental health professional with domestic violence expertise and would require the court to consider the results of that evaluation.This bill would authorize an exemption from the relinquishment requirement, only during scheduled working hours, for a nonpeace officer who is required to carry a specific firearm, ammunition, or firearm and ammunition as a condition of continued employment, as specified, if the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence, in writing or on the record, that the respondent does not pose an additional threat of harm to a protected party or the public by having access to the specific firearm, ammunition, or firearm and ammunition. The bill would authorize the court to order a psychological evaluation by a licensed mental health professional with domestic violence expertise to make this finding.The bill would require the court, if an exemption is granted during the pendency of a temporary restraining order and the court subsequently issue

CA AB 2770 - House Public Employment and Retirement Committee
Public employees’ retirement.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (April 3). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2770, as amended, Committee on Public Employment and Retirement. Public employees’ retirement. (1) Existing law, the Teachers’ Retirement Law, establishes the State Teachers’ Retirement System (STRS), and sets forth the provisions for its administration and the delivery of benefits to its members. Existing law authorizes a member to request to purchase additional service credit and to redeposit accumulated retirement contributions returned to the member, as provided. Existing law specifies the basis for the contribution amount, depending on whether the member is or is not employed to perform creditable service subject to coverage by the Defined Benefit Program on the date of the request to purchase additional service credit. Existing law requires additional regular interest to be added to the contributions, as specified, if the member is not employed to perform creditable service subject to coverage by the Defined Benefit Program on the date of the request to purchase additional service credit.This bill would revise that interest calculation. The bill would require the member to sign and return the completed statement of contributions and interest required from STRS to purchase service credit at a specific cost no later than 35 calendar days from the date of the offer. The bill would also require a member to sign and return the completed election to repay accumulated retirement contributions from STRS to redeposit at a specific cost no later than 35 calendar days from the date of the offer.Existing law authorizes members to request to redeposit all or a portion of specified contributions with regular interest from the date of refund to the date of payment.This bill would instead authorize members to request to redeposit all or a portion of specified contributions with regular interest from the date of refund to the date STRS receives the request to redeposit.This bill would also make various technical changes.(2) Existing law, the County Employees Retirement Law of 1937 (CERL), prescribes the rights, benefits, and duties of members of the retirement systems established pursuant to its provisions.Existing law provides that participants in certain membership categories may be entitled to special benefits if the injury that causes their disability arises in the course of their employment. Existing law creates a presumption, for purposes of qualification for disability retirement benefits for specified members, that certain injuries, including post-traumatic stress disorder, as defined, arose out of, or in the course of, the member’s employment. Existing law authorizes the presumption relating to these injuries to be rebutted by evidence to the contrary, but unless controverted, the applicable governing board of a public retirement system is required to find in accordance with the presumption. Existing law repeals the provisions related to post-traumatic stress disorder on January 1, 2025.This bill would instead repeal the provisions related to post-traumatic stress disorder on January 1, 2029.Existing law prescribes the procedures the retirement board must follow to pay a member their accumulated contributions, if the service of a member is discontinued other than by death or retirement, including requiring the board to send to the member, a registered or certified letter, return receipt requested, as specified. Existing law also requires the board to attempt to locate a person or estate entitled to payment of a member’s accumulated contributions or any other benefit that fails to claim the payment or cannot be located through means that the board in its sound discretion deems reasonable including, but not limited to, a registered or certified letter, return receipt requested, as specified.This bill would remove the return receipt requirements.(3) The Judges’ Retirement Law prescribes retirement benefits for judges, as defined, who were first elected or appointed to judicial office before November 9, 1994. Existing law establi

CA AB 2771 - Brian K. Maienschein
Pupil attendance: schoolsite absence intervention teams.
02/16/2024 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 2771, as introduced, Maienschein. Pupil attendance: schoolsite absence intervention teams. Existing law authorizes the establishment of county and local school attendance review boards that may promote the use of alternatives to the juvenile court system if available public and private services are insufficient or inappropriate to correct school attendance or school behavioral problems, as provided. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to coordinate and administer a state school attendance review board, as provided.This bill would require the State Department of Education, by the beginning of the 2026–27 school year, to post information on its internet website about methods of reducing chronic absenteeism, including through the formation of schoolsite absence intervention teams composed of specified members, as provided.

CA AB 2775 - Michael A. Gipson
Community paramedicine.
02/16/2024 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 2775, as introduced, Gipson. Community paramedicine. Existing law establishes, until January 1, 2031, the Community Paramedicine or Triage to Alternate Destination Act of 2020. Existing law states that it is the intent of the Legislature, among other things, that local emergency medical services (EMS) agencies be authorized to develop a community paramedicine or triage to alternate destination program to improve patient care and community health. Existing law states that it is the intent of the Legislature to monitor and evaluate implementation of community paramedicine and triage to alternate destination programs by local EMS agencies in California and determine whether these programs should be modified or extended before the program ends.This bill would make a technical conforming change to these provisions.

CA AB 2795 - Joaquin Arambula
CalWORKs Indian Health Clinic Program.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2795, as amended, Arambula. CalWORKs Indian Health Clinic Program. Existing federal law provides for allocation of federal funds to eligible states and tribes through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program. Existing state law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program under which, through a combination of state and county funds and federal funds received through the TANF program, each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to annually allocate appropriated funds to each federally recognized American Indian tribe with reservation lands or rancherias in the state that administers a federal tribal TANF grant program. Existing law authorizes the Director of Social Services to provide funding to Indian health clinics to provide substance abuse and mental health services, and other related services authorized under the CalWORKs program to CalWORKs applicants and recipients and tribal TANF applicants and recipients living in California.This bill would designate that funding authorization for Indian health clinics as the CalWORKs Indian Health Clinic Program. The bill would require the department, to the extent that funds are appropriated by the Legislature for this purpose, to provide semiannual prospective payments to a grantee under the program equal to no more than 90% of the total grant amount during a 12-month fiscal year. The bill would require the grant payments to be contingent upon a written request for payment from the grantee, and the submission by the grantee, and the approval by the department, of specified progress reports and budget expenditure reports. The bill would require the department to retain the final payment, pending satisfactory submission by the grantee of all progress reports required by the grant, budget expenditure reports, and an annual reconciliation report for the grant year, as specified.

CA AB 28 - Anthony J. Portantino Jr.
Firearms and ammunition: excise tax.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 28, Gabriel. Firearms and ammunition: excise tax. Existing law establishes the California Violence Intervention and Prevention (CalVIP) Grant Program, administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award competitive grants for the purpose of violence intervention and prevention.Existing law imposes various taxes, including taxes on the privilege of engaging in certain activities. The Fee Collection Procedures Law, the violation of which is a crime, provides procedures for the collection of certain fees and surcharges.This bill, the Gun Violence Prevention and School Safety Act, would, commencing July 1, 2024, impose an excise tax in the amount of 11% of the gross receipts from the retail sale in this state of a firearm, firearm precursor part, and ammunition, as specified. The tax would be collected by the state pursuant to the Fee Collection Procedures Law. The bill would require that the revenues collected be deposited in the Gun Violence Prevention and School Safety Fund, which the bill would establish in the State Treasury. The bill would require the moneys received in the fund to be used to fund various gun violence prevention, education, research, response, and investigation programs, as specified. The bill would require the Director of Finance to transfer, as a loan, $2,400,000 from the General Fund to the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration to implement these provisions, as specified. The bill would require each licensed firearms dealer, firearms manufacturer, and ammunition vendor to register with the department for a certificate, as specified. The bill would also provide procedures for the issuance, revocation, and reinstatement of a permit.This bill would include a change in state statute that would result in a taxpayer paying a higher tax within the meaning of Section 3 of Article XIII?A of the California Constitution, and thus would require for passage the approval of 2/3 of the membership of each house of the Legislature.Because this bill would expand the scope of the Fee Collection Procedures Law, the violation of which is a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 280 - Maria Elena Durazo
Segregated confinement.
09/14/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Assembly Member Holden.
AB 280, as amended, Holden. Segregated confinement. Existing law establishes the state prisons under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Existing law places county jails under the jurisdiction of the sheriff for the confinement of persons sentenced to imprisonment for the conviction of a crime.This bill would require every jail, prison, public or privately operated detention facility, and a facility in which individuals are subject to confinement or involuntary detention to develop and follow written procedures governing the management of segregated confinement, as specified, and to make those written procedures publicly available. The bill would require those facilities to document the use of segregated confinement by, among other things, providing written orders of that confinement to the individual confined, as specified. The bill would prohibit those facilities from involuntarily placing an individual in segregated confinement if the individual belongs to a designated population, including, among others, that the individual has a mental or physical disability or that the individual is under 26 years of age or over 59 years of age. The bill would require the facility to periodically check on the individual and have a medical or mental health professional periodically assess the individual. This bill would require a facility to offer out-of-cell programming to individuals in segregated confinement for at least 4 hours per day, not including time spent on an unpaid work assignment or in paid employment. The bill would require a facility to maximize the amount of time that an incarcerated person held in segregated confinement spends outside of their cell by providing outdoor and indoor recreation, education, clinically appropriate treatment therapies, and skill-building activities, as specified, and would require facilities to develop and provide appropriate programming to individuals that pose a significant safety risk to themselves or others, as specified. The bill would also authorize a facility to use segregated confinement to help treat and protect against the spread of communicable disease, under certain circumstances.This bill would prohibit a facility from holding an individual in segregated confinement for more than 15 consecutive days and no more than 45 days in a 180-day period, as specified. This bill would also prohibit a facility from imposing limitations on services, treatment, or basic needs; conducting out-of-cell programming opportunities in a smaller cage or therapy module; placing an individual in segregated confinement on the basis of confidential information, as specified; using specified restraints when an individual is in segregated confinement; and using segregated confinement as a means of protecting an individual. This bill would require a facility administrator or chief physician to conduct a secondary review of a person in segregated confinement’s dispute regarding qualification in the designated populations category. This bill would require facilities to create and publish monthly, semiannual, and annual reports, as specified. The bill would require the Office of the Inspector General and the Board of State and Community Corrections to assess each facility’s compliance with the act, as specified. This bill would require local and state authorities to promulgate regulations or directives to implement the act, where applicable. The bill would declare these provisions to be severable. By imposing additional duties on county jails, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant

CA AB 2800 - Ash Kalra
Elders and dependent adults: abuse or neglect.
04/09/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 2800, as amended, Kalra. Elders and dependent adults: abuse or neglect. Existing law, the Elder Abuse and Dependent Adult Civil Protection Act, sets forth various provisions for the reporting, investigation, and prosecution of elder and dependent adult abuse. The act requires specified persons, known as mandated reporters, to report cases of elder or dependent adult abuse, including cases of physical abuse or neglect. Under the act, failure to report the abuse is a misdemeanor.Existing law defines “neglect” for purposes of the act to include, among other things, failure to assist in personal hygiene or in the provision of food, clothing, or shelter, or failure to prevent malnutrition or dehydration.This bill would expand the definition of neglect to include (1) failure to implement a treatment plan, (2) failure to provide or arrange for services necessary for physical, mental, or emotional health, and (3) carelessness that produces or could reasonably be expected to result in serious physical injury, mental suffering, or death.Existing law defines “physical abuse” for purposes of the act to include, among other things, use of a physical or chemical restraint or psychotropic medication for specified purposes, including for punishment or for any purpose not authorized by a physician and surgeon.This bill would expand the definition of physical abuse to include use of a physical or chemical restraint or psychotropic medication for discipline or convenience when not required to treat the resident’s medical symptoms and administered by a long-term health care facility or residential care facility for the elderly, as defined.By expanding the definitions of neglect and physical abuse, thereby expanding the scope of the crime of failing to report the neglect or abuse, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The act provides for the award of attorney’s fees and costs to, and the recovery of damages by, a plaintiff when it is proven by clear and convincing evidence that the defendant is liable for physical abuse, neglect, or abandonment, and that the defendant has been found guilty of recklessness, oppression, fraud, or malice in the commission of that abuse.This bill would instead apply a preponderance-of-the-evidence standard for those cases.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2806 - Miguel Santiago
Mental health.
02/16/2024 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 2806, as introduced, Santiago. Mental health. Existing law, the Bronzan-McCorquodale Act, governs the organization and financing of community mental health services for persons with mental health disorders in every county through locally administered and locally controlled community mental health programs.This bill would make technical, nonsubstantive changes to that provision.

CA AB 2818 - Devon John Mathis
County jail: available social services.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2818, as amended, Mathis. County jail: available social services. Existing law creates a program authorizing the sheriff or county officer responsible for operative jails of certain counties to assist indigent inmates with the reentry process within 30 days after the inmate’s release from the county jail or other adult detention facility, as specified. Existing law specifies that the assistance provided may include work placement, counseling, obtaining proper identification, education, and housing.This bill would require, beginning January 1, 2026, each county jail to provide each incarcerated person with the contact information for certain entities, including, among other things, the local social services agency, upon release from custody, as specified. The bill would authorize the information to be provided electronically if the incarcerated person provides the necessary contact information. By imposing duties on local jails, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2828 - Jasmeet Bains
Child health and safety: “Have a Heart, Be a Star, Help Our Kids” license plate program.
02/16/2024 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 2828, as introduced, Bains. Child health and safety: “Have a Heart, Be a Star, Help Our Kids” license plate program. Existing law requires the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue “Have a Heart, Be a Star, Help Our Kids” special license plates and imposes additional fees, as specified, for their issuance, renewal, replacement, and transfer. Existing law requires that those additional fees be deposited in the Child Health and Safety Fund, less specified amounts. Existing law requires that 50% of the funds derived from the “Have a Heart, Be a Star, Help Our Kids” license plates be available, upon appropriation, to the State Department of Social Services for administering various provisions related to childcare licensing, as specified. Existing law requires that, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the balance be available, as described, for programs that address other categories of potential childhood injury, as specified. Existing law requires counties to create local childcare resource and referral programs to identify childcare resources and establish a referral process for parents, among other things. Existing law also creates the California Children and Families Commission to promote, support, and improve early childhood development. Existing law provides for funding to county commissions that develop, adopt, promote, and implement local early childhood development programs consistent with specified goals and objectives.This bill would increase the fees for the initial issuance and renewal of the “Have a Heart, Be a Star, Help Our Kids” license plates. The bill would allocate, upon an appropriation by the Legislature, 50% of the fees collected on or after January 1, 2026, to local childcare resource and referral programs, for specified purposes, including recruitment and training of new childcare providers, and to the State Department of Social Services for administering the above-described childcare licensing provisions, in equal measure except that in no case shall the allocation to the department be less than the amount appropriated in the 2022–2023 fiscal year. The bill would require a portion of the funds to be allocated to the agency having oversight of new and continuing childcare provider health and safety education and training program curriculum for specified purposes. Of the fees collected on or after January 1, 2026, the bill would allocate a portion to the State Department of Public Health in support of addressing childhood injury prevention and a portion to county commissions, as prescribed, that elect to receive funding and would limit the spending of those funds for certain purposes, including administering the California Unintentional Injury Prevention Strategic Plan Project. The bill would require that no more than 5% of the funds allocated to address childhood injury prevention be available to the nonprofit organization that provides administrative and staff support to the California Unintentional Injury Prevention Strategic Plan Project and would require the nonprofit organization to report annually to the State Department of Public Health on its activities and support evidence-based technical assistance and training for childhood unintentional injury prevention programs to the county commissions.

CA AB 2829 - Diane Papan
Digital Advertising Services Tax Law.
04/02/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on REV. & TAX.
AB 2829, as amended, Papan. Digital Advertising Services Tax Law. Existing law imposes taxes upon income and real property, and taxes upon certain transactions and excise taxes. The Fee Collection Procedures Law provides procedures for the collection of certain fees and surcharges and is administered by the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration. Under existing law, a violation of the Fee Collection Procedures Law is a crime.This bill would, beginning January 1, 2025, require a person with at least $100,000,000 in annual gross revenues, as defined, to pay a tax on annual gross revenues that are derived from digital advertising services in the state at a specified rate. The bill would prohibit a taxpayer from directly passing on the cost of the tax to a customer. The bill would state the intent of the Legislature that the net proceeds from the tax would be used to fund youth mental health services. The bill would require the department to administer and collect the tax pursuant to the Fee Collection Procedures Law. By expanding the application of the crimes associated with the Fee Collection Procedures Law, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.This bill would include a change in state statute that would result in a taxpayer paying a higher tax within the meaning of Section 3 of Article XIII?A of the California Constitution, and thus would require for passage the approval of 2/3 of the membership of each house of the Legislature.This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy.

CA AB 283 - James Norwood Patterson Jr.
Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission.
09/07/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Niello.
AB 283, as introduced, Jim Patterson. Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the Mental Health Oversight and Accountability Commission to oversee the implementation of the MHSA. Existing law specifies the composition of the 16-member commission, including the Attorney General or their designee, the Superintendent of Public Instruction or their designee, specified members of the Legislature, and 12 members appointed by the Governor, as prescribed. Existing law authorizes the MHSA to be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Legislature if the amendments are consistent with, and further the purposes of, the MHSA, or by a majority vote to clarify procedures and terms. This bill would urge the Governor, in making appointments, to consider ensuring geographic representation among the 10 regions of California defined by the 2020 census.

CA AB 2830 - Robert A. Rivas
Foster care: relative placement: family finding.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2830, as introduced, Robert Rivas. Foster care: relative placement: family finding. Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which may adjudge a child to be a dependent of the court under certain circumstances, including when the child suffered, or there is a substantial risk that the child will suffer, serious physical harm or illness as a result of the failure or inability of their parent or guardian to adequately supervise or protect the child. Existing law requires a county social worker to conduct an investigation, within 30 days of a child’s removal, to identify and locate adult relatives of the child, as specified, and to provide them with a notification that the child has been removed from the custody of the child’s parents, guardians, or Indian custodian, and an explanation of the various options to participate in the care and placement of the child. Existing law also requires the notice to provide information about, among other things, additional services and support that are available in out-of-home placements.This bill would specify that the additional services and support that are available in out-of-home placements in the notice from the social worker include, but are not limited to, mental health supports, childcare, and financial assistance intended to aid in the costs of providing care. To the extent the bill imposes additional duties on counties, the bill would impose a state-mandated program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2841 - Marie Waldron
State hospitals for persons with mental health disorders: patient funds.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR. pursuant to Joint Rule 10.5.
AB 2841, as amended, Waldron. State hospitals for persons with mental health disorders: patient funds. Existing law sets forth various functions and duties for the State Department of State Hospitals with respect to the administration of state institutions for the care and treatment of persons with mental health disorders. Existing law authorizes the Director of State Hospitals to deposit funds of patients in trust, as specified. Existing law also authorizes the hospital administrator, with the consent of the patient, to deposit the interest or increment on the funds of the patient in the state hospital in a special fund for each state hospital, designated the “Benefit Fund,” and requires the hospital administrator to be the trustee of the fund.Existing law authorizes the hospital administrator, with the approval of the Director of State Hospitals, to expend moneys in the fund for the education or entertainment of the patients of the institution. Existing law requires that the hospital administrator take into consideration the recommendations of representatives of patient government and recommendations submitted by patient groups before expending any moneys in the fund.This bill would additionally authorize the funds to be expended for the welfare of the patients of the institution. The bill would require the hospital administrator of a state hospital to notify patients, patient governments, and patient groups, in writing, about any newly authorized expenditure options for the benefit fund, when applicable.

CA AB 285 - Christopher M. Ward
Pupil instruction: science requirements: climate change.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 285, as amended, Luz Rivas. Pupil instruction: science requirements: climate change. (1) Existing law requires the adopted course of study for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, and the adopted course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to include certain areas of study, including, among others, English, mathematics, social sciences, science, and visual and performing arts, as specified.This bill, with respect to both of the above-referenced adopted courses of study, would require the science area of study to include an emphasis on the causes and effects of climate change and methods to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The bill would require that appropriate coursework including this material be offered to pupils as soon as possible, commencing no later than the 2024–25 school year.Because the bill would impose new duties on school districts, it would constitute a state-mandated local program.(2) This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 51210 of the Education Code proposed by AB 446 and SB 509 to be operative only if this bill and either or both of those bills are enacted and this bill is enacted last.(3) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2865 - Wendy Carrillo
Pupil instruction: excessive alcohol use.
03/27/2024 - In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
AB 2865, as amended, Wendy Carrillo. Pupil instruction: excessive alcohol use. Existing law prescribes required courses of study in grades 1 to 12, inclusive. Existing law requires instruction upon the nature of alcohol, narcotics, restricted dangerous drugs, and other dangerous substances to be included in the curriculum of all elementary and secondary schools, and instruction on the effects of those substances upon prenatal development to be included in the curriculum of all secondary schools, as provided. Existing law requires the governing board of the school district to adopt regulations specifying the grade or grades and the course or courses in which that instruction shall be included, as provided.This bill would require the above-described instruction on the nature and effects of alcohol to include information about excessive alcohol use and the short-term and long-term health risks of excessive alcohol use. The bill would require this instruction to include information about excessive drinking, the immediate effects of alcohol that increase the risks of harmful health conditions, and how excessive alcohol use can lead to the development of chronic diseases and other serious problems, including mental health problems. By imposing obligations on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2882 - Kevin McCarty
California Community Corrections Performance Incentives.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 1.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2882, as introduced, McCarty. California Community Corrections Performance Incentives. Existing law authorizes each county to establish a Community Corrections Performance Incentives Fund to receive moneys for the implementation of a community corrections program to provide supervision and rehabilitative services for adult felony offenders subject to local supervision. Existing law requires the program to be developed and implemented by probation and advised by a local Community Corrections Partnership. Existing law requires the partnership to be comprised of specified members, including, among others, a representative from a community-based organization with experience in successfully providing rehabilitative services to persons who have been convicted of a criminal offense.This bill would add a representative of a community-based organization with experience in successfully providing behavioral health treatment services to persons who have been convicted of a criminal offense, and a representative of a Medi-Cal managed care plan that provides the Enhanced Care Management benefit, to the membership of the partnership.Existing law requires each county local Community Corrections Partnership to recommend a local plan to the county board of supervisors, and requires the board to accept or reject the plan. Existing law requires the plan to be voted on by an executive committee of each county’s partnership consisting of, among others, one department representative from the head of the county department of social services, the head of the county department of mental health, or the head of the county alcohol and substance abuse programs.This bill would instead require the committee to consist of all 3 of the departments mentioned above and would require the department head to have the number of votes equivalent to the number of departments they represent. The bill would require the plan to, among other things, include quantifiable goals for improving the community corrections system, as specified. The bill would require the local partnership to submit the accepted plan annually to the Board of State and Community Corrections.This bill would require each county to submit the County Community Corrections Outcomes, Accountability, and Transparency report annually to the Board of State and Community Corrections that includes, among other things, the number of people who have a serious mental illness or substance use disorder who are connected to community-based treatment and support upon release from jail or completion of community supervision. The bill would require each county’s board of supervisors to verify that the report is complete and accurate before it is submitted to the board. Because this bill would expand the duties for certain local officials, it would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law requires the Board of State and Community Corrections to collect and maintain available information and data about state and community correctional policies, practices, capacities, and needs, including, but not limited to, prevention, intervention, suppression, supervision, and incapacitation, as they relate to both adult corrections, juvenile justice, and gang problems. Existing law requires the board to collect and analyze available data regarding the implementation of the local plans and other outcome-based measures.This bill would require the board to create the Community Corrections Outcomes, Accountability, and Transparency dashboard that displays the county’s goals mentioned above and the spending and outcomes data reported in the County Community Corrections Outcomes, Accountability, and Transparency report. The bill would require the dashboard to be accessible through the board’s internet website.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill w

CA AB 289 - Christopher R. Holden
Mental health services: representation.
09/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 289, Holden. Mental health services: representation. Existing law, the Bronzan-McCorquodale Act, contains provisions governing the operation and financing of community mental health services in every county through locally administered and locally controlled community mental health programs. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act, an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 in the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the Mental Health Services Fund to fund various county mental health programs. The act may be amended by the Legislature only by a 2/3 vote of both houses and only so long as the amendment is consistent with and furthers the intent of the act. The Legislature may clarify procedures and terms of the act by majority vote.Existing law establishes the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission and requires counties to prepare and submit a 3-year program and expenditure plan, and annual updates, as specified, to the commission and the State Department of Health Care Services. Existing law requires the plan to be developed with specified local stakeholders, along with other important interests.This bill would require stakeholders to include sufficient participation of individuals representing diverse viewpoints, including representatives from youth from historically marginalized communities, representatives from organizations specializing in working with underserved racially and ethnically diverse communities, and representatives from LGBTQ+ communities. By requiring counties to consult with additional stakeholders, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2893 - Christopher M. Ward
The Shared Recovery Housing Residency Program.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on H. & C.D.
AB 2893, as amended, Ward. The Shared Recovery Housing Residency Program. Existing law establishes the California Interagency Council on Homelessness to oversee the implementation of Housing First guidelines and regulations, and, among other things, identify resources, benefits, and services that can be accessed to prevent and end homelessness in California. Existing law requires a state agency or department that funds, implements, or administers a state program that provides housing or housing-related services to people experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness to revise or adopt guidelines and regulations to include enumerated Housing First policies. Existing law specifies the core components of Housing First, including services that are informed by a harm-reduction philosophy that recognizes drug and alcohol use and addiction as a part of tenants’ lives and where tenants are engaged in nonjudgmental communication regarding drug and alcohol use.This bill would authorize state programs to fund recovery housing, as defined, under these provisions as long as the state program uses at least 75% of its funds for housing or housing-based services using a harm-reduction model and the recovery housing meets certain requirements, including that core outcomes of the recovery housing emphasize long-term housing stability and minimize returns to homelessness. The bill would also prohibit eviction on the basis of relapse, as specified. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license and regulate facilities that provide residential nonmedical services to adults who are recovering from problems related to alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug misuse or abuse, and who need alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug recovery treatment or detoxification services. Existing law also requires the department to certify alcohol and other drug treatment recovery services, as specified.This bill would require the department to oversee certification of recovery houses that serve individuals experiencing, or who are at risk of experiencing, homelessness or mental health issues, with a housing first model, as defined. The bill would require the department to establish criteria for certification of recovery houses in order to allow a recovery house to receive referrals from the department as available housing for persons experiencing, or at risk of experiencing, homelessness or mental health issues. The bill would prohibit recovery houses from providing any licensed services onsite, including, but not limited to, incidental medical services. The bill would authorize the department to charge a fee for certification of recovery houses in an amount not to exceed the reasonable cost of administering the program, not to exceed $1,000, and would establish the Shared Recovery Housing Residency Program Fund for collection of the fee.

CA AB 2932 - Joe Patterson
Pupil instruction: sextortion prevention.
04/08/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2932, as amended, Joe Patterson. Pupil instruction: sextortion prevention. Existing law establishes the Instructional Quality Commission and requires the commission to, among other things, recommend curriculum frameworks to the State Board of Education. This bill would require the Instructional Quality Commission, when the health curriculum framework is next revised on or after January 1, 2025, to consider providing for inclusion, in that curriculum framework, content on sextortion, as defined.

CA AB 2941 - Timothy S. Grayson
Parents and youth: helpline and online support.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2941, as amended, Grayson. Parents and youth: helpline and online support. Existing law provides for various programs and services to support parents, children, and families, including the Home Visiting Program under the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, which provides case management and evidence-based home visiting for the purpose of family support, and family preservation services, which are services for children and families designed to help families at risk or in crisis.This bill would, subject to an appropriation by the Legislature for this purpose, require the State Department of Social Services to contract with a nonprofit organization to operate and maintain the California Parent Youth Helpline to provide emotional support through calls, live chats, and texts 7 days a week and weekly online groups for parents, children, and youth to strengthen their families. The bill would require the nonprofit organization to meet specified qualifications and would specify the responsibilities of the nonprofit organization to also include, among other things, providing statewide marketing and outreach to parents, children, and youth and distributing parenting, child development, and resiliency program materials. The bill would make findings and declarations related to these provisions.

CA AB 2956 - Tasha Boerner
Medi-Cal eligibility: redetermination.
03/14/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2956, as amended, Boerner. Medi-Cal eligibility: redetermination. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law generally requires a county to redetermine a Medi-Cal beneficiary’s eligibility to receive Medi-Cal benefits every 12 months and whenever the county receives information about changes in a beneficiary’s circumstances that may affect their Medi-Cal eligibility. Existing law conditions implementation of the redetermination provisions on the availability of federal financial participation and receipt of any necessary federal approvals. Under existing law, if a county has facts clearly demonstrating that a Medi-Cal beneficiary cannot be eligible for Medi-Cal due to an event, such as death or change of state residency, Medi-Cal benefits are terminated without a redetermination.Existing law requires the department, subject to federal funding, to extend continuous eligibility to children 19 years of age or younger for a 12-month period, as specified. Under existing law, operative on January 1, 2025, or the date that the department certifies that certain conditions have been met, a child is continuously eligible for Medi-Cal up to 5 years of age. Under those provisions, a redetermination is prohibited during this time, unless certain circumstances apply, including, voluntary disenrollment, death, or change of state residency.This bill would require the department to seek federal approval to extend continuous eligibility to individuals over 19 years of age. Under the bill, subject to federal funding, and except as described above with regard to death, change of state residency, or other events, an individual would remain eligible from the date of a Medi-Cal eligibility determination until the end of a 12-month period, as specified.The bill would make various changes to the above-described redetermination procedures. The bill would, among other things, require the county, in the event of a loss of contact, to attempt communication with the intended recipient through all additionally available channels before completing a prompt redetermination. The bill would require the county to make another review of certain obtained information in an attempt to renew eligibility without needing a response from a beneficiary.The bill would require the county to complete a determination at renewal without requesting additional information or documentation if specified conditions are met, relating to, among other things, prior income verification and no contradictory information on file.When income is found not reasonably compatible from electronically available sources, the bill would require the county to first attempt to obtain a reasonable explanation through a verbal or written explanation, in an attempt to resolve a discrepancy between the beneficiary’s self-attestation and information received through electronic data sources on required eligibility factors. For purposes of the income verification process only, when a renewal is received without a reasonable explanation or other income verification, the bill would require a county to accept self-attested information, as specified.Under the bill, for a beneficiary whose eligibility was discontinued due to failure to provide needed information and who submits to the county that information, as specified, the beneficiary would be entitled to a Medi-Cal eligibility determination for the 3 months immediately prior to the month in which the beneficiary provided the information, unless the beneficiary opts out. The bill would make conforming changes to related provisions.In the case of a redetermination due to a change in circumstances, each time a Medi-Cal beneficiary who is considered a member of a vulnerable or difficult-to-reach populatio

CA AB 2977 - Corey A. Jackson
Personal Income Tax Law: young child tax credit.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on REV. & TAX.
AB 2977, as amended, Jackson. Personal Income Tax Law: young child tax credit. (1) The Personal Income Tax Law allows various credits against the taxes imposed by that law, including a young child tax credit to a qualified taxpayer in a specified amount multiplied by the earned income tax credit adjustment factor, as provided. That law also allows a payment from the continuously appropriated Tax Relief and Refund Account for an amount in excess of tax liability. Existing law defines “qualified taxpayer” for this purpose to include an eligible individual, as defined, who has a qualifying child, defined to be a child younger than 6 years of age as of the last day of the taxable year, and who meets other specified criteria. Under existing law, the young child tax credit phases out by reducing the amount of the credit by $20 for each $100, or fraction thereof, that the taxpayer’s earned income, as defined, exceeds a specified amount. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2025, instead define a “qualifying child” to mean a child younger than 18 years of age as of the last day of the taxable year. The bill would establish the Child Tax Credit Expansion Fund in the State Treasury, and continuously appropriate the moneys in that fund to the Franchise Tax Board, as provided. The bill would also require the Franchise Tax Board, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2024, to recalculate the phaseout provisions for the young child tax credit such that the credit reaches $0 as earned income reaches $50,000. The bill would require the Franchise Tax Board to first utilize the moneys in the Child Tax Credit Expansion Fund for the purpose of the above-described expansion of the young child tax credit. By establishing and funding a new continuously appropriated fund, and by increasing the payments from the Tax Relief and Refund Account, a continuously appropriated fund, the bill would make an appropriation.(2) The Personal Income Tax Law, in modified conformity with federal income tax laws, allows an earned income tax credit against personal income tax and a payment from the Tax Relief and Refund Account, a continuously appropriated fund, for an allowable credit in excess of tax liability to an eligible individual that is equal to that portion of the earned income tax credit allowed by federal law, as determined by the earned income tax credit adjustment factor, as specified. Under existing law, the earned income tax credit phases out for taxpayers that earn over a specified amount and, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2020, the credit reaches $0 when the taxpayer’s income reaches $30,000, as adjusted. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2024, adjust the phaseout of the earned income tax credit so that the credit reaches $0 when the taxpayer’s income reaches $20,000, as adjusted. The bill would direct that any increase in revenue or savings from this change be deposited into the Child Tax Credit Expansion Fund.(3) The Personal Income Tax Law, in modified conformity with federal income tax laws, provides for the taxation of the gain or loss from the disposition of property. Existing law generally calculates gain for this purpose as the difference of the amount realized from the disposition of property over the adjusted basis of the property, and calculates loss for this purpose as the difference of the adjusted basis of the property over the amount realized from the disposition of the property. Under existing law, where property is received from a decedent, the basis of the property becomes the fair market value of the property as of the date of the decedent’s death, except as provided.This bill would eliminate the rule that allows the basis of property to automatically become the fair market value of the property as of the date of a decedent’s death. The bill would direct that any increase in revenue generated due to this change be deposited into the Ch

CA AB 2985 - Gregg Hart
Courts: mental health advisement.
04/11/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2985, as amended, Hart. Courts: mental health advisement. The Trial Jury Selection and Management Act requires all persons be selected for jury service at random, from a source or sources inclusive of a representative cross section of the population of the area served by the court. Existing law requires the court, in a criminal case, to conduct an initial examination of prospective jurors.This bill would require the court after the receipt of a verdict, or after the conclusion of a trial where a jury did not render a verdict, and before discharge of the jury, in a criminal action or proceeding alleging a violent felony, as defined, to provide written information to the trial jurors and discharged alternate jurors about mental health awareness, including information about stress relief and symptoms that may be experienced following exposure to trauma. The bill would authorize a court to provide this information to jurors or alternate jurors in other criminal proceedings. The bill would require the Judicial Council to provide the written educational information that a court is required to provide, as specified.

CA AB 2995 - Corey A. Jackson
Public health: alcohol and drug programs: definitions.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2995, as introduced, Jackson. Public health: alcohol and drug programs: definitions. Under existing law, the State Department of Health Care Services is responsible for administering prevention, treatment, and recovery services for alcohol and drug abuse and problem gambling. Existing law defines “alcohol abuser” and “drug abuser,” for these purposes, as anyone who has a problem related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages or illicit, illegal, legal, or prescription drugs or over-the-counter medications in a manner other than prescribed, respectively, whether or not it is of a periodic or continuing nature. Existing law defines “alcohol and other drug services” as a service that is designed to encourage recovery from the abuse of alcohol and other drugs, and “alcohol and other drug abuse program” as a collection of alcohol and other drug services that are coordinated to achieve specified objectives.This bill would revise and recast various terms, including alcohol and other drug abuse program, alcohol abuser, and drug abuser to use person-first terminology and to focus instead on substance use disorder.

CA AB 2999 - Pilar Schiavo
Pupil instruction: homework policy.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on ED.
AB 2999, as amended, Schiavo. Pupil instruction: homework policy. Existing law grants pupils, parents, and guardians certain rights regarding the delivery of educational services, including, among others, rights regarding primary supplemental instruction materials. Existing law provides that none of these rights shall be construed as restricting teachers in the assignment of homework.This bill would require each school district, county office of education, and charter school, on or before January 1, 2026, to develop and adopt, across at least 2 public meetings, a homework policy to create guidelines for clearer practices on assigning homework in transitional kindergarten, kindergarten, and any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, as specified. The bill would, among other things, require the adopted homework policy to be annually distributed at the beginning of the school year to all certificated staff and administrators, to all pupils and parents or legal guardians, as specified, and by publication on the local educational agency’s internet website and on the internet websites of the individual schools operated by the local educational agency. The bill would require the adopted policy to be updated at least once every 5 years. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill also would encourage private schools to adopt homework policies with guidelines consistent with these provisions.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 3014 - Jacqui V. Irwin
Restrictions on firearm possession.
04/11/2024 - From Consent Calendar by request of Assembly Member Essayli. To Third Reading.
AB 3014, as introduced, Irwin. Restrictions on firearm possession. Existing law authorizes a court to issue a gun violence restraining order to prohibit a person from purchasing or possessing a firearm or ammunition for a period of one to 5 years, subject to renewal for additional one- to 5-year periods, if the subject of the petition poses a significant danger of self-harm or harm to another in the near future by having a firearm and the order is necessary to prevent personal injury to the subject of the petition or another. Existing law also allows a gun violence restraining order to be issued on an ex parte basis for up to 21 days. Existing law allows a petition for these gun violence restraining orders to be made by a law enforcement officer, or an immediate family member, employer, coworker, or teacher, as specified, of the subject of the petition.This bill would additionally authorize a district attorney to request that the court issue a temporary emergency gun violence restraining order. The bill would make other conforming changes.Existing law prohibits a person from possessing a firearm or other deadly weapon if the person is admitted to a mental health facility and the mental health professional who is treating the person determines that the person is a danger to themself or others and requires the professional to report to a local law enforcement agency the identity of the person, as specified. Existing law authorizes a law enforcement agency to temporarily confiscate any firearm or other deadly weapon that the person possesses while the person is admitted, as specified. Existing law requires the confiscating law enforcement agency to initiate a petition in the superior court within 30 days of the person being released from the facility for a hearing to determine whether the return of the firearm or other deadly weapon would be likely to result in endangering the person or others, as specified.This bill would additionally allow a mental health practitioner to report the identity of a person prohibited from possessing a firearm or other deadly weapon to a district attorney and would additionally authorize a district attorney to file the petition to determine if the person should continue to be prohibited from possessing a firearm or other deadly weapon. The bill would make other conforming changes.

CA AB 3037 - Bill Essayli
Sentencing: dismissal of enhancements.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 3037, as introduced, Essayli. Sentencing: dismissal of enhancements. Existing law generally authorizes a court to dismiss an action in the furtherance of justice. Existing law requires a court to dismiss an enhancement if it is in the furtherance of justice to do so, except if dismissal of that enhancement is prohibited by any initiative statute.This bill would make the provision relating to the dismissal of enhancements inapplicable to firearms-related enhancements, but would allow the court to dismiss these firearm-related enhancements pursuant to the court’s general authority to dismiss an action, as specified.

CA AB 3039 - Bill Essayli
Juries: peremptory challenges.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Coms. on JUD. and PUB. S.
AB 3039, as introduced, Essayli. Juries: peremptory challenges. Existing law provides for the exclusion of a prospective juror from a trial jury by peremptory challenge. Existing law prohibits a party from using a peremptory challenge to remove a prospective juror on the basis of an assumption that the prospective juror is biased merely because of the sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, mental disability, physical disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, or sexual orientation of the prospective juror, or on similar grounds. Existing law presumes a peremptory challenge for specified reasons, including views related to law enforcement, to be invalid unless a party can demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that an objectively reasonable person would view the rationale as unrelated to a prospective juror’s race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, national orientation, or religious affiliation, or perceived membership in any of those groups. This bill would remove a prospective juror’s views related to law enforcement as a presumptively invalid basis for exercising a peremptory challenge.

CA AB 3047 - Kevin McCarty
Youth athletics: chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on A., E., S., & T.
AB 3047, as amended, McCarty. Youth athletics: chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Under the California Youth Football Act, a youth sports organization, as defined, that conducts a tackle football program must comply with certain requirements, including, among other things, having a licensed medical professional, which may include a state-licensed emergency medical technician, paramedic, or higher-level licensed medical professional, present during games.Until July 1, 2027, this bill would require the Surgeon General to convene a Commission on Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Youth Tackle Football to investigate issues related to the risks of brain injury associated with participation in youth tackle football, and to provide recommendations to the Governor and the Legislature on strategies to reduce those health risks, including the minimum appropriate age for participation in youth tackle football. The bill would require the Surgeon General to publish a report on their internet website on or before January 1, 2027, with the findings of the commission.

CA AB 3049 - Isaac Bryan
Dependency: court hearings.
04/04/2024 - In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
AB 3049, as amended, Bryan. Dependency: court hearings. Existing law entitles a minor who is the subject of a juvenile court hearing to be present at that hearing. Existing law requires the court to inform the minor, if the minor is present at the hearing, of their right to address the court and participate in the hearing. Existing law requires the court, if the minor is 10 years of age or older and not present at the hearing, to determine whether the minor was properly notified of their right to attend the hearing and inquire whether they were given an opportunity to attend. Existing law requires the court to continue the hearing to allow the minor to be present, if they were not properly notified or if they wished to present, but were not given the opportunity, unless the court finds that it is in the minor’s best interest not to continue the hearing. Existing law requires the court to continue the hearing only for the period of time necessary to provide the child notice and secure their presence.This bill would expand the above provisions to include nonminor dependents. The bill would also require a court, if the child or nonminor dependent is not present at the hearing, to ask counsel for the child or nonminor dependent to state, on the record, the date of counsel’s most recent personal contact with the child or nonminor dependent. The bill would require the court, if the court finds that counsel had no contact with the child or nonminor dependent in the last 6 months, to continue the hearing to allow counsel time to do so to assess their well-being and determine their wishes with respect to the issues presently before the court, unless the court finds that it is in the best interest of the child or nonminor dependent not to continue the hearing. The bill would require the court to continue the hearing only for the period of time necessary to provide counsel with a reasonable amount of time to contact the child or nonminor dependent.

CA AB 3059 - Akilah Weber
Human milk.
03/12/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 3059, as amended, Weber. Human milk. Existing law licenses and regulates tissue banks and generally makes a violation of the requirements applicable to tissue banks a crime. Existing law exempts a “mothers’ milk bank,” as defined, from paying a licensing fee to be a tissue bank.This bill would specify that a general acute care hospital is not required to have a license to operate a tissue bank to store or distribute pasteurized human milk that was obtained from a mothers’ milk bank.Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, requires the Department of Managed Health Care to license and regulate health care service plans and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Other existing law requires the Department of Insurance to regulate health insurers. Existing law requires health care service plans and health insurers, as specified, to provide certain health benefits and services, including, among others, maternity hospital stays, inpatient hospital and ambulatory maternity services, and maternal mental health programs. This bill would require a health care service plan contract or health insurance policy that is issued, amended, delivered, or renewed on or after January 1, 2025, to cover the same health benefits for human milk and human milk derivatives covered under the Medi-Cal program as of 1988.Because a violation of the bill’s provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 3077 - Gregg Hart
Criminal procedure: borderline personality disorder.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 3077, as amended, Hart. Criminal procedure: borderline personality disorder. Existing law prohibits a person from being tried for a criminal offense while they are mentally incompetent. Existing law prescribes the procedure for a person found to be mentally incompetent to be restored to competence. Existing law creates the Mental Health Diversion Fund to be used for the purpose of supporting county activities that will divert individuals with serious mental illnesses away from the criminal justice system and lead to a reduction of felony incompetent to stand trial determinations. Existing law describes the target population for mental health diversion as individuals diagnosed with a mental disorder, as specified, excluding antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, and pedophilia.This bill would remove borderline personality disorder as an exclusion for pretrial diversion.Existing law generally authorizes a court to dismiss an action or to strike or dismiss an enhancement in the furtherance of justice. Existing law requires a court to dismiss an enhancement if it is in the furtherance of justice to do so, except if dismissal of that enhancement is prohibited by any initiative statute. Existing law requires the court to consider and afford great weight to evidence offered by the defendant to prove that specified mitigating circumstances are present, including when the offense is connected to a mental illness, as specified, excluding antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, and pedophilia.This bill would remove borderline personality disorder as an exclusion for the purposes of the court’s evaluation of mitigating circumstances under this provision.

CA AB 309 - Ash Kalra
The Social Housing Act.
10/07/2023 - Vetoed by Governor.
AB 309, Lee. The Social Housing Act. Existing law establishes the Department of General Services to provide centralized services, including, but not limited to, planning, acquisition, construction and maintenance of state buildings and property. Existing law authorizes the Director of General Services, with the consent of the state agency concerned, to lease state-owned real property when the Director of General Services deems that leasing serves a beneficial public purpose limited to the development of housing.This bill would enact the Social Housing Act and would create, in the Department of General Services, the Social Housing Program, the mission of which would be to ensure that qualified social housing developments are produced on leased state property to help address the housing crisis, as specified. The bill would authorize the program to identify and develop up to 3 qualified social housing projects, as specified, with the intent to use the results to inform public policy related to developing an independent public entity to develop statewide qualified social housing. The bill would require the program to solicit bids to develop qualified social housing units, and prioritize bids that demonstrate long-term revenue neutrality or a cost rent model, as those terms are defined. The bill would require the program to employ 2 different leasing models, the rental model and the ownership model, as specified, in creating social housing. The bill would prohibit a city or county from denying a social housing development authorized under the program. The bill would authorize a city or county to propose objective design review standards, as specified, and authorize a city or county to propose modifications to mitigate any specific, adverse impacts on public health or safety, as specified.

CA AB 310 - Joaquin Arambula
CalWORKs.
06/27/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 310, as amended, Arambula. CalWORKs. Existing federal law provides for allocation of federal funds through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program to eligible states. Existing law establishes the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which, through a combination of state and county funds and federal funds received through the TANF program, each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families. Existing law imposes various eligibility requirements for the CalWORKs program, including that a child is deprived of parental support or care, a child has received all age-appropriate immunizations, and specified applicants or recipients who are apparently eligible for unemployment insurance shall meet the conditions of eligibility for and accept any unemployment insurance benefits for which they are eligible.This bill would, among other things, repeal the parental deprivation and immunization requirements, and would instead only require that those specified applicants and recipients whom the county has evidence that they are eligible for unemployment insurance to apply for, but not meet the conditions of, unemployment insurance benefits. By expanding eligibility for the CalWORKs program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law generally requires a recipient of CalWORKs benefits to participate in welfare-to-work activities as a condition of eligibility for aid, except if they are exempt or excused from participation for good cause. Existing law requires a participant to enter into a written welfare-to-work plan with the county, and specifies the work activities that may be included in a participant’s plan, including mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence services that are necessary to obtain and retain employment. Existing law also requires participants to participate in job search activities for a period of up to 4 consecutive weeks, as specified. This bill would, among other things, revise and recast the welfare-to-work program, by renaming it as the family assistance program, repealing the provision that makes participation in work activities a condition of eligibility for CalWORKs aid, and instead requiring that every recipient be provided with an opportunity to participate in family assistance activities. The bill would expand the list of work activities by including home visiting services and financial literacy classes and coaching that are necessary to obtain and retain employment or improve family or financial well-being, activities that develop and enhance workplace skills, and activities that build foundations for employment, as specified. The bill would repeal the job search requirements. The bill would require a county to provide the participant with a plan form within 60 days after the date that a participant’s eligibility for aid is determined or the date the participant chooses to participate in work activities wherein the recipient may select the activities and the number of hours they want to participate in, including any and all available support services. By increasing the duties of counties administering the CalWORKs program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Under existing law, when an individual fails or refuses to comply with specified components of the CalWORKs program without good cause, and conciliation efforts have failed, the individual is subject to a financial sanction that requires the family’s grant to be reduced by removing the noncomplying family member from the assistance unit. Existing law prohibits sanctions from being applied for a failure or refusal to comply with program requirements if, among other reasons, the employment, offer of employment, activity, or other training, or for employment discriminates on specified bases or involves conditions that are in violation of applicable health and safety standards, among other

CA AB 3103 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Dependent children: health screenings.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 3103, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Dependent children: health screenings. Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which may adjudge a child to be a dependent of the court under certain circumstances, including when the child suffered, or there is a substantial risk that the child will suffer, serious physical harm or illness as a result of the failure or inability of their parent or guardian to adequately supervise or protect the child. Existing law authorizes a peace officer, probation officer, or social worker, without a warrant, to take a minor into temporary custody for various reasons, including when the child has been declared a dependent of the juvenile court or there is reasonable cause to believe the minor comes within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. Existing law permits a social worker or the juvenile court to authorize the performance of medical, surgical, dental, or other remedial care needed by a child who is in temporary custody, who is a dependent of the juvenile court and placed under the supervision of a social worker, or for whom a dependency petition has been filed after notifying the parent, guardian, or person standing in loco parentis of the child.This bill would additionally permit, in the absence of a standing court order, a social worker to authorize a noninvasive initial medical, dental, and mental health screening of a child in temporary custody. The bill would require the social worker to make reasonable attempts to notify the parent that the child will be undergoing a screening and to provide the parent with a reasonable opportunity to object. The bill would provide that if the parent objects, the screening may be conducted only upon the order of the court. The bill would also add mental health care, as defined, to the medical and dental care that may be authorized for a child who is in temporary custody, who is a dependent of the juvenile court and placed under the supervision of a social worker, or for whom a dependency petition has been filed.

CA AB 3109 - Blanca Pacheco
Theft.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 3109, as introduced, Muratsuchi. Theft. (1) Existing law, the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act, enacted as an initiative statute by Proposition 47, as approved by the electors at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election, makes the theft of money, labor, or property petty theft punishable as a misdemeanor whenever the value of the property taken does not exceed $950 and grand theft when the value exceeds $950. Proposition 47 requires shoplifting, defined as entering a commercial establishment with the intent to commit larceny if the value of the property taken does not exceed $950, to be punished as a misdemeanor.The bill would, if a person has one conviction for a specified theft offense, make a second or subsequent conviction punishable by imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding one year, or 16 months, or 2 or 3 years.(2) Existing law, until January 1, 2026, authorizes a city or county prosecuting authority or county probation department to create a diversion or deferred entry of judgment program for persons who commit a theft offense or repeat theft offenses, as specified.This bill would, commencing January 1, 2026, authorize a city or county prosecuting authority or county probation department to create a diversion program for persons who commit theft or repeat theft offenses, as specified.(3) This bill would provide that the provisions of the bill that amend Proposition 47 would become effective only upon approval of the voters, and would provide for the submission of those provisions to the voters for approval at the next statewide general election.

CA AB 3145 - Isaac Bryan
Family preservation services: standards.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 3145, as introduced, Bryan. Family preservation services: standards. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services (department) and county welfare departments to establish and support a public system of statewide child welfare services available in each county, as specified.Existing law declares the intent of the Legislature to encourage the continuity of the family unit by providing family preservation services, which may include counseling, mental health treatment, and transportation, among other things. Existing law requires an authorized participating county to provide specific programs of direct services based on individual family needs, as specified. Existing law authorizes a county to establish family preservation programs that serve one or more geographic areas of the county, subject to the approval of the department. Existing law requires that the services selected by a participating county be reasonable and meritorious, as specified.This bill, the Foster Care Justice through Meaningful Help for Parents Act, would also require that those services be evidence based, as defined, and culturally competent, as provided through qualified professionals. The bill would make conforming changes to related provisions. The bill would require the department, by January 1, 2026, to define, by regulation, the terms “culturally competent” and “qualified professional.” The bill would make related findings and declarations.Under existing law, the program in each county is deemed successful if certain standards are met, including that at least 60% of the children receiving services remain at home one year, and 2 years, after services are terminated.This bill would add as a standard that, during the first year after services are terminated, no more than 25% of children whose parents or guardian received services are children who meet any of specified circumstances, including removal from the physical custody of their parents or guardians. The bill would also add, among other standards, 2 years after termination of the services, that no more than 10% of the children meet any of those circumstances.Existing law requires the Office of Child Abuse Prevention within the department to require counties to submit annual reports on program services and children and families served.This bill would require that the annual reports include certain information, including, among other things, a description of how a county’s contracts with providers ensure minimum qualifications. The bill would require the department to post the annual report to its internet website within 30 business days of receipt of an annual report from a county.

CA AB 3170 - Liz Ortega
Public health: maternal substance abuse.
03/27/2024 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on JUD. Read second time and amended.
AB 3170, as amended, Ortega. Public health: maternal substance abuse. Existing law, the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act, requires certain persons specified as “mandated reporters” to report suspected child abuse or child neglect, as specified. The act provides that a positive toxicology screen at the time of the delivery of an infant is not in and of itself a sufficient basis for reporting child abuse or neglect but requires an indication of maternal substance abuse to lead to an assessment of the needs of the mother and child pursuant to a specified provision of law, and, if other factors are present that indicate risk to a child, a report is required to be made, as specified.Existing law requires each county to establish protocols between county health departments, county welfare departments, and public and private hospitals in the county, regarding the application and use of a needs assessment of, and a referral for, certain substance-exposed infants to a county welfare department.Existing law requires a clinic, health facility, home health agency, or hospice to prevent unlawful or unauthorized access to, and use or disclosure of, patients’ medical information, as defined. Existing law authorizes a health care provider to disclose medical information to a county social worker, probation officer, foster care public health nurse, or any other person authorized to have custody or care of a minor for purposes of coordinating health care services and medical treatment. Existing law authorizes those individuals to receive medical information and protected health information, as specified. A violation of these provisions may be punished as a misdemeanor. Existing law exempts specific medical and mental health evidence from a civil proceeding, including medical-dental staff committee findings and recommendations, as specified, or that a person suffered or experienced excited delirium.This bill would prohibit the releasing, reporting, or providing of a perinatal person’s or a newborn’s drug test or alcohol test or screen results, or information about drug or alcohol use in a pregnant or perinatal person’s or newborn’s medical records or otherwise known to a medical provider, as specified. The bill would also require a licensed clinic, health facility, home health agency, or hospice to prevent unlawful or unauthorized access to, and use or disclosure of, among other information, a perinatal person’s or newborn’s drug test or alcohol test or screen results. This bill would prohibit the admission of those results or information in a civil proceeding.By expanding the scope of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 32 - Stephanie Nguyen
Violent felonies: hate crimes.
02/17/2023 - In committee: Set, second hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 32, as introduced, Stephanie Nguyen. Violent felonies: hate crimes. Existing law classifies certain felonies as violent felonies for purposes of various provisions of the Penal Code. Existing law imposes an additional one-year term for a sexually violent felony and a 3-year term for a violent felony for each prior separate prison term served for a violent felony.This bill would additionally define felony hate crimes as a violent felony, as specified. By increasing the punishment for a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 3209 - Marc Berman
Community colleges: Basic Needs Coordinator and Center.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on HIGHER ED.
AB 3209, as introduced, Berman. Community colleges: Basic Needs Coordinator and Center. Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges, under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges, as one of the 3 segments of public postsecondary education in this state. Existing law establishes community college districts throughout the state, and authorizes them to provide instruction to students at community college campuses. Existing law requires each campus of the California Community Colleges, no later than July 1, 2022, to establish the position of Basic Needs Coordinator to assist students with on- and off-campus housing, food, mental health, and other basic needs services and resources, among other responsibilities, and to establish a Basic Needs Center where basic needs services, resources, and staff are made available to students, as specified. Existing law requires each community college campus to report certain information to the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges related to basic needs services and resources. Existing law requires the chancellor’s office to develop and submit a report to the Governor and the Legislature every year beginning on or before May 1, 2023, based on the data and information received from campuses and information on the use of funds made available to implement these provisions.This bill would instead require the chancellor’s office to develop and submit the report to the Governor and the Legislature every year on or before June 1, as provided.

CA AB 3216 - Albert Y. Muratsuchi
Pupils: use of smartphones.
04/04/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (April 3). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 3216, as amended, Hoover. Pupils: use of smartphones. Existing law authorizes the governing body of a school district, a county office of education, or a charter school to adopt a policy to limit or prohibit the use by its pupils of smartphones while the pupils are at a schoolsite or while the pupils are under the supervision and control of an employee or employees of that school district, county office of education, or charter school. Existing law, however, specifies circumstances in which a pupil could not be prohibited from possessing or using a smartphone.This bill would instead require, no later than July 1, 2026, the governing body of a school district, a county office of education, or a charter school to adopt a policy to limit or prohibit the use by its pupils of smartphones while the pupils are at a schoolsite or while the pupils are under the supervision and control of an employee or employees of that school district, county office of education, or charter school, as provided. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would constitute a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 3217 - Isaac Bryan
Juveniles: Justice Through Placing Foster Children with Families Act.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 3217, as amended, Bryan. Juveniles: Justice Through Placing Foster Children with Families Act. Existing law requires a county social worker to investigate the circumstances of each child taken into temporary custody by a peace officer under specified circumstances. Existing law requires the social worker to conduct an investigation, within 30 days of the child’s removal, to identify and locate adult relatives of the child, as specified, and to provide them with a notification that the child has been removed from the custody of the child’s parents, guardians, or Indian custodian, and an explanation of the various options to participate in the care and placement of the child.This bill, the Justice Through Placing Foster Children with Families Act, would require each county, by January 30 of each year, to review publicly available data comparing the statewide national average rate of placing children with relatives in the prior year for comparison with the county’s placement rate during the same period. The bill would require that, if the county’s placement rate is less than the statewide average, the county welfare director, or their designee, shall, no later than December 1, communicate at least once with the county welfare directors of the 3 counties with the highest placement rates or their designees to compare best practices for family finding. The bill would require that each year a county has a rate of placing children with relatives that is less than the statewide average, the county board of supervisors of that county shall, at least once, include the topic for discussion on the agenda at a regularly noticed meeting of the full board. By increasing the duties of county welfare departments and county boards of supervisors, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would make related findings and declarations.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 3231 - Carlos Villapudua
Violent felonies: hate crimes.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 3231, as introduced, Villapudua. Violent felonies: hate crimes. Existing law classifies certain felonies as violent felonies for purposes of various provisions of the Penal Code. Existing law imposes an additional one-year term for a sexually violent felony and a 3-year term for a violent felony for each prior separate prison term served for a violent felony.This bill would additionally define felony hate crimes as a violent felony, as specified. By increasing the punishment for a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 3234 - Liz Ortega
Employers: child labor: social compliance audit.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on L. & E.
AB 3234, as introduced, Ortega. Employers: child labor: social compliance audit. Existing law establishes the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement within the Department of Industrial Relations and authorizes the division to enforce the provisions of the Labor Code and all labor laws of the state which are not specifically vested in any other officer, board, or commission. Existing law regulates the wages, hours, and working conditions of any man, woman, and minor employed in any occupation, trade, or industry, whether compensation is measured by time, piece, or otherwise, except as specified.This bill would require an employer to post a clear and conspicuous link to a report detailing the findings of its most recent child labor social compliance audit on the internet website for their business, if the employer has voluntarily subjected that business to a child labor social compliance audit. The bill would define the term “child labor social compliance audit” to mean an inspection of any production house, factory, farm, or packaging facility of a business to verify whether it complies with social and ethical responsibilities, health and safety regulations, and labor laws regarding child labor. The bill would require that report to include, among other things, whether the business does or does not engage in, or support the use of, child labor and a copy of any written policies and procedures the business has regarding child employees.

CA AB 328 - Bill Essayli
Sentencing: dismissal of enhancements.
03/08/2023 - From committee: Without further action pursuant to Joint Rule 62(a).
AB 328, as introduced, Essayli. Sentencing: dismissal of enhancements. Existing law generally authorizes a court to dismiss an action or to strike or dismiss an enhancement in the furtherance of justice. Existing law requires a court to dismiss an enhancement if it is in the furtherance of justice to do so, except if dismissal of that enhancement is prohibited by any initiative statute. This bill would also prohibit a court from dismissing specified firearms-related enhancements.Existing law requires a person who personally uses a firearm to commit certain specified felonies to be punished by an additional and consecutive term of imprisonment in the state prison for 10 years, or for 20 years if the person discharged the firearm, or for 25 years to life if the person discharged the firearm and proximately caused great bodily injury or death. Existing law authorizes a court, in the interest of justice and at the time of sentencing or resentencing, to strike or dismiss an enhancement otherwise required to be imposed by that law.This bill would prohibit a court from striking an allegation or a finding that would make a crime punishable pursuant to those enhancement provisions, except that a court could strike or dismiss an enhancement when the person did not personally use or discharge the firearm or when the firearm was unloaded.

CA AB 3291 - House Human Services Committee
Developmental services.
04/01/2024 - Referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 3291, as introduced, Committee on Human Services. Developmental services. (1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (act), requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under existing law, the regional centers purchase needed services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities through approved service providers, or arrange for their provision through other publicly funded agencies. The services and supports to be provided to a regional center consumer are contained in an individual program plan (IPP), which is developed by the planning team according to specified procedures. Existing law requires the planning process for the IPP to include various components and guidelines, such as a statement of goals, based on the needs, preferences, and life choices of the individual with developmental disabilities, a review of the general health status of the individual, and a transportation access plan, as specified.This bill additionally would require the IPP planning process to include, when a regional center consumer is being cared for by a parent, a discussion regarding caregiver succession and, if determined to be necessary, development of a caregiver succession plan, as specified. The bill would define “caregiver succession” as the transition between one caregiver and the caregiver that assumes responsibility to care for a regional center consumer.(2) Existing law requires the department and regional centers to provide specified supported living services for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law lists the range of supported living services and supports to include, among other things, recruiting, training, and hiring individuals to provide personal care and other assistance. Existing law also authorizes regional centers to make rent, mortgage, or lease payments under specified circumstances, including when the regional center executive director verifies in writing that making the rent, mortgage, or lease payments or paying for household expenses is required to meet the specific care needs unique to the individual consumer, as specified, and is required when a consumer’s demonstrated medical, behavioral, or psychiatric condition presents a health and safety risk to the consumer or another.This bill would additionally authorize a regional center to make rent, mortgage, or lease payments or pay for household expenses when the executive director certifies in writing that the consumer’s demonstrated risk of homelessness presents a health and safety risk to the consumer or another.(3) Existing law authorizes the removal of a child from the custody of a parent or guardian under specified conditions, including the neglect or abuse of that child or the finding by the juvenile court that the minor is a dependent child of the court. Existing law requires that, regardless of the person or persons currently holding the right to make educational decisions for the child, a foster parent, relative caregiver, nonrelated extended family member, or resource family will retain rights and obligations regarding accessing and maintaining health and education information for the child.This bill would require, regardless of the person or persons currently holding the right to make educational decisions for the child, the court to ensure that the educational rights holder has provided authorizations required for the commencement of regional center services.

CA AB 33 - Dennis Kelly Seyarto
Fentanyl Misuse and Overdose Prevention Task Force.
09/14/2023 - Urgency clause adopted. Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 33, as amended, Bains. Fentanyl Misuse and Overdose Prevention Task Force. Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, classifies controlled substances into 5 schedules and places the greatest restrictions and penalties on the use of those substances placed in Schedule I. The act classifies the drug fentanyl in Schedule II. Existing law prohibits a person from possessing for sale or purchasing for purposes of sale, specified controlled substances, including fentanyl, and provides for imprisonment in a county jail for 2, 3, or 4 years for a violation of this provision.This bill would, subject to an appropriation, establish the Fentanyl Misuse and Overdose Prevention Task Force to undertake various duties relating to fentanyl misuse, including, among others, collecting and organizing data on the nature and extent of fentanyl misuse in California and evaluating approaches to increase public awareness of fentanyl misuse. The bill would require the task force to be cochaired by the Attorney General and the State Public Health Officer, or their designees, and would specify the membership of the task force.The bill would require the first meeting of the task force to take place no later than June 1, 2024, and would require the task force to meet at least once every 2 months. The bill would require the task force to submit an interim report to the Governor and the Legislature by July 1, 2025, and would require the task force to report its findings and recommendations to the Governor and the Legislature by December 1, 2025.The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2026.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA AB 331 - Rebecca Bauer-Kahan
Automated decision tools.
05/17/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 331, as amended, Bauer-Kahan. Automated decision tools. The Unruh Civil Rights Act provides that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state are free and equal, and regardless of their sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sexual orientation, citizenship, primary language, or immigration status are entitled to the full and equal accommodations, advantages, facilities, privileges, or services in all business establishments of every kind whatsoever. The California Fair Employment and Housing Act protects and safeguards the right and opportunity of all persons to seek, obtain, and hold employment without discrimination, abridgment, or harassment on account of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, age, sexual orientation, reproductive health decisionmaking, or veteran or military status. The act establishes the Civil Rights Department within the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency and requires the department to, among other things, bring civil actions to enforce the act.This bill would, among other things, require a deployer, as defined, and a developer of an automated decision tool, as defined, to, on or before January 1, 2025, and annually thereafter, perform an impact assessment for any automated decision tool the deployer uses that includes, among other things, a statement of the purpose of the automated decision tool and its intended benefits, uses, and deployment contexts. The bill would require a deployer or developer to provide the impact assessment to the Civil Rights Department within 60 days of its completion and would punish a violation of that provision with an administrative fine of not more than $10,000 to be recovered in an administrative enforcement action brought by the Civil Rights Department. The bill would authorize certain public attorneys, including the Attorney General, to bring a civil action against a deployer or developer for a violation of the bill. The bill would require a public attorney to, before commencing an action for injunctive relief, provide 45 days’ written notice to a deployer or developer of the alleged violations of the bill and would provide a deployer or developer a specified opportunity to cure those violations, if, among other things, the deployer or developer provides the person who gave the notice an express written statement, under penalty of perjury, that the violation has been cured and that no further violations shall occur. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would require a deployer to, at or before the time an automated decision tool is used to make a consequential decision, as defined, notify any natural person that is the subject of the consequential decision that an automated decision tool is being used to make, or be a controlling factor in making, the consequential decision and to provide that person with, among other things, a statement of the purpose of the automated decision tool. The bill would, if a consequential decision is made solely based on the output of an automated decision tool, require a deployer to, if technically feasible, accommodate a natural person’s request to not be subject to the automated decision tool and to be subject to an alternative selection process or accommodation, as prescribed. This bill would prohibit a deployer from using an automated decision tool that results in algorithmic discrimination, which the bill would define to mean the condition in which an automated decision tool contributes to unjustified differential treatment or impacts disfavoring people based on their actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, sex, religion, age, national origin, limited English proficiency, disability, veteran s

CA AB 349 - James C. Ramos
Patton State Hospital: lease: housing and mental health services for homeless individuals.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 349, Ramos. Patton State Hospital: lease: housing and mental health services for homeless individuals. Existing law authorizes the Department of General Services to perform various duties relating to state real property, including by authorizing the Director of General Services to let a building located at Patton State Hospital to a nonprofit corporation or local government, for a period not to exceed 20 years, for the purpose of providing services to elderly persons.This bill would delete the 20-year lease maximum and would additionally authorize the Director of General Services to lease the building described above for the purposes of providing housing to homeless individuals and providing mental health services to those individuals.

CA AB 352 - Rebecca Bauer-Kahan
Health information.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 352, Bauer-Kahan. Health information. Existing law, the Reproductive Privacy Act, provides that every individual possesses a fundamental right of privacy with respect to their personal reproductive decisions. Existing law prohibits the state from denying or interfering with a person’s right to choose or obtain an abortion prior to viability of the fetus, or when the abortion is necessary to protect the life or health of the person.Existing law, the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (CMIA), generally prohibits a provider of health care, a health care service plan, or a contractor from disclosing medical information regarding a patient, enrollee, or subscriber without first obtaining an authorization, unless a specified exception applies. The CMIA requires every provider of health care, health care service plan, pharmaceutical company, or contractor who, among other things, maintains or stores medical information to do so in a manner that preserves the confidentiality of the information contained therein. The CMIA also prohibits a provider of health care, a health care service plan, a contractor, or an employer from releasing medical information that would identify an individual or related to an individual seeking or obtaining an abortion in response to a subpoena or a request or to law enforcement if that subpoena, request, or the purpose of law enforcement for the medical information is based on, or for the purpose of enforcement of, either another state’s laws that interfere with a person’s rights to choose or obtain an abortion or a foreign penal civil action. Existing law makes a violation of the CMIA that results in economic loss or personal injury to a patient punishable as a misdemeanor.This bill would require specified businesses that electronically store or maintain medical information on the provision of sensitive services on behalf of a provider of health care, health care service plan, pharmaceutical company, contractor, or employer to develop capabilities, policies, and procedures, on or before July 1, 2024, to enable certain security features, including limiting user access privileges and segregating medical information related to gender affirming care, abortion and abortion-related services, and contraception, as specified. The bill would additionally prohibit a provider of health care, health care service plan, contractor, or employer from cooperating with any inquiry or investigation by, or from providing medical information to, an individual, agency, or department from another state or, to the extent permitted by federal law, to a federal law enforcement agency that would identify an individual or that is related to an individual seeking or obtaining an abortion or abortion-related services that are lawful under the laws of this state, unless the request for medical information is authorized in accordance with specified existing provisions of law. The bill would exempt a provider of health care from liability for damages or from civil or enforcement actions relating to cooperating with, or providing medical information to, another state or a federal law enforcement agency before January 31, 2026, if the provider of health care is working diligently and in good faith to comply with the prohibition. Because the bill would expand the scope of an existing crime, it would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law requires the California Health and Human Services Agency, in consultation with stakeholders and local partners, to establish the California Health and Human Services Data Exchange Framework that includes a single data sharing agreement and common set of policies and procedures that govern and require the exchange of health information among health care entities and government agencies in California. Existing law requires, on or before January 31, 2024, that specified entities, including general acute care hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, exchange health information, as defined

CA AB 360 - Michael A. Gipson
Excited delirium.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 77. Noes 0.).
AB 360, as amended, Gipson. Excited delirium. (1) Existing law specifies the content of a certificate of death and sets forth the persons responsible for completing the certificate of death. Existing law requires certain medical and health content on the certificate.This bill would prohibit “excited delirium,” as defined, from being recognized as a valid medical diagnosis or cause of death in this state. The bill would prohibit a coroner, medical examiner, physician, or physician assistant from stating on the certificate of death or in any report that the cause of death was excited delirium. (2) Existing law designates specified employees and appointees of certain public entities to be peace officers. Existing law grants certain powers to peace officers and prescribes certain requirements and responsibilities for peace officers and their employing or appointing entities.The bill would prohibit a peace officer from using the term “excited delirium” to describe an individual in an incident report, but would not prohibit the peace officer from describing an individual’s behavior, as specified. (3) Existing law governs the rules of evidence in every action before the Supreme Court or a court of appeal or superior court, including rules relating to judicial notice, evidentiary burdens, witnesses, opinion testimony and scientific evidence, privileges, evidence affected or excluded by extrinsic policies, hearsay evidence, and writings.This bill would deem evidence that a person experienced or suffered an excited delirium inadmissible in a civil action, but would not prohibit a party or witness from testifying as to the factual circumstances surrounding the case, including a person’s demeanor, conduct, and physical and mental condition, provided it is not attributed to excited delirium.

CA AB 366 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
County human services agencies: workforce development.
09/11/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Ashby.
AB 366, as amended, Petrie-Norris. County human services agencies: workforce development. Existing law  generally provides for various human services programs, including, but not limited to, child welfare services. Existing law requires the state, through the department and county welfare departments, to establish and support a public system of statewide child welfare services to be available in each county of the state, and requires all counties to establish and maintain specialized organizational entities within the county welfare department, which have sole responsibility for the operation of the child welfare services program.This bill would require the State Department of Social Services to establish a stipend program, subject to an appropriation by the Legislature, for the purpose of providing grants in the form of educational stipends to community college students who have an interest in public child welfare work. The bill would require the department to administer the program through existing mechanisms applicable to other postsecondary education stipend programs administered by the department for which the state receives matching funds pursuant to specified federal law. The bill would require the program to provide stipends to students who either reside in, or are enrolled in a community college in, counties with a population of 500,000 or less, and who are in a relevant program of coursework, as specified.Existing law vests the Department of Human Resources with the jurisdiction and responsibility of establishing and maintaining personnel standards on a merit basis, and administering merit systems for local government agencies where those merit systems of employment are required by statute or regulation as a condition of a state-funded program or a federal grant-in-aid program established under federal law, including, but not limited to, the Social Security Act, as specified. Existing law requires the department, for the purposes of administering those state or federally supported programs, by regulation, to establish and maintain personnel standards on a merit basis for local agencies, as specified, as necessary for proper and efficient administration, and to ensure state conformity with applicable federal requirements. Existing law requires the department to administer the merit system for employees engaged in administering state-funded and federal grant-in-aid programs in a local agency not administering its own merit system, as specified.This bill, notwithstanding those provisions, would require the department, for specified local agencies with an employment vacancy rate of 20% or greater for 30 consecutive days in any state-funded or federal grant-in-aid program, to allow those agencies to use alternate processes to screen applications and establish eligibility lists for recruitment of new staff, and advancement of existing staff, until the vacancy rate falls below 20 percent continuously for 3 consecutive months. The bill would authorize those alternatives to include allowing counties to screen and establish eligibility lists directly with oversight by the department, implementing alternative examination requirements without advance approval by the department, and waiving examination components. If the employees are represented by an employee organization, as specified, the bill would authorize a local agency to implement alternative examination requirements or waive examination components only after meeting and conferring with, and obtaining mutual agreement from, the employee organization. The bill would authorize the alternative processes to be implemented until January 1, 2029. The bill would require the department, by July 1, 2026, to convene representatives of local agencies and applicable state departments, including, but not limited to, the State Department of Social Services, the Department of Child Support Services, and representatives from employee organizations that represent local agency employees,

CA AB 387 - Cecilia M. Aguiar-Curry
Alzheimer’s disease.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 387, as amended, Aguiar-Curry. Alzheimer’s disease. Existing law requires the Secretary of California Health and Human Services to be responsible for oversight and coordination of programs serving people living with Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions, and their families. Existing law establishes the Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Advisory Committee in the California Health and Human Services Agency, and specifies the committee’s duties, including requirements for making policy and plan recommendations.This bill would rename the advisory committee to the Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Conditions Advisory Committee, and expand the number of members serving on the committee from 14 to at least 21, but not more than 25, members. This bill would specify the qualifications of certain members on the committee. The bill would, in the provisions governing the committee, revise references to Alzheimer’s disease to also refer to related conditions.

CA AB 4 - Maria Elena Durazo
Covered California: expansion.
07/13/2023 - Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 4, as amended, Arambula. Covered California: expansion. Existing federal law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), requires each state to establish an American Health Benefit Exchange to facilitate the purchase of qualified health benefit plans by qualified individuals and qualified small employers. Existing state law creates the California Health Benefit Exchange, also known as Covered California, to facilitate the enrollment of qualified individuals and qualified small employers in qualified health plans as required under PPACA. Existing law requires the Exchange to apply for a federal waiver to allow persons otherwise not able to obtain coverage through the Exchange because of their immigration status to obtain coverage from the Exchange.This bill would delete that requirement and would instead require the Exchange to administer a program to allow persons otherwise not able to obtain coverage by reason of immigration status to enroll in health insurance coverage in a manner as substantially similar to other Californians as feasible given existing federal law and rules. The bill would require the Exchange to undertake outreach, marketing, and other efforts to ensure enrollment. The bill would also require the Exchange to adopt an annual program design for each coverage year to implement the program, and would require the Exchange to provide appropriate opportunities for stakeholders, including the Legislature, and the public to consult on the design of the program.

CA AB 425 - David Alvarez
Medi-Cal: pharmacogenomic testing.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 425, Alvarez. Medi-Cal: pharmacogenomic testing. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law sets forth a schedule of covered benefits under the Medi-Cal program.This bill would, commencing on July 1, 2024, add pharmacogenomic testing as a covered benefit under Medi-Cal, as specified. The bill would define pharmacogenomic testing as laboratory genetic testing that includes, but is not limited to, a panel test, to identify how a person’s genetics may impact the efficacy, toxicity, and safety of medications.The bill would condition implementation of this benefit coverage on receipt of any necessary federal approvals and the availability of federal financial participation. The bill would authorize the department to implement these provisions through all-county letters or similar instructions.The bill would also make related legislative findings.

CA AB 426 - Corey A. Jackson
Unlicensed residential foster care facilities: temporary placement management.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 77. Noes 1.).
AB 426, as amended, Jackson. Unlicensed residential foster care facilities: temporary placement management. Existing law prohibits an unlicensed community care facility, as defined, from operating in the state, and prohibits a person, firm, partnership, association, or corporation within the state, or state or local public agency, from operating, establishing, managing, conducting, or maintaining a community care facility in this state, without a current, valid community care facility license. Existing law authorizes the department to assess an immediate civil penalty in the amount of $200 per day for a violation of either or both of those prohibitions, as specified.This bill would additionally authorize the department to assess an immediate civil penalty in the amount of $1,000 for each day of the violation on a person, as defined, who provides residential care to children.Existing law requires the Director of Social Services to follow specified procedures if the director believes that a county is substantially failing to comply with specified provisions of law or any regulation pertaining to any program administered by the department, including, among other things, taking formal action to secure compliance and providing counties with written notice of that action and a minimum of 30 days to correct its failure to comply.This bill would additionally apply these procedures when a county has failed to comply with the California Community Care Facilities Act. The bill would additionally require the director to inform the county welfare director and the board of supervisors by written notice if the director is informed a county is failing to comply with any provision of law or regulation pertaining to any program administered by the department.

CA AB 428 - Marie Waldron
California Department of Reentry.
01/18/2024 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 428, as amended, Waldron. California Department of Reentry. Existing law grants the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) authority to operate the state prison system and gives the department jurisdiction over various state prisons and other institutions. Existing law requires the department to determine and implement a system of incentives to increase inmate participation in, and completion of, academic and vocational education, consistent with the inmate’s educational needs, as specified. Existing law requires the department to develop and implement a plan to obtain additional rehabilitation and treatment services for prison inmates and parolees, and requires the department to expand substance abuse treatment services in prisons to accommodate at least 4,000 additional inmates who have histories of substance abuse, as specified.This bill would establish the California Department of Reentry, independent from the CDCR, to provide statewide leadership, coordination, and technical assistance to promote effective state and local efforts to ensure successful reentry services are provided to incarcerated individuals. The bill would require the department to focus on programming through the period of incarceration that supports successful reentry to society, facilitate the smooth transition of individuals from prison to release by developing individualized reentry plans for each individual, and oversee continuity of care for incarcerated individuals with health and substance use disorders during community supervision and parole, among other things.

CA AB 443 - Corey A. Jackson
Peace officers: determination of bias.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 443, as amended, Jackson. Peace officers: determination of bias. Existing law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to set minimum standards for the recruitment and training of peace officers, to establish a certification for peace officers, and to develop training courses and curriculum for the training of peace officers. Existing law, commencing January 1, 2023, authorizes POST to suspend or revoke the certification of a peace officer if the person has been terminated for cause from employment as a peace officer, or has, while employed as a peace officer, otherwise engaged in serious misconduct, which includes demonstrating bias on the basis of race, national origin, religion, gender identity or expression, housing status, sexual orientation, mental or physical disability, or other protected status. Existing law requires each law enforcement agency to be responsible for completing investigations of allegations of serious misconduct of a peace officer.This bill would, commencing January 1, 2026, require POST to establish a definition of “biased conduct,” as specified, and would require law enforcement agencies to use that definition in any investigation into a bias-related complaint or an incident that involves possible indications of officer bias, and to determine if any racial profiling occurred, as defined. The bill would also require POST to develop guidance for local law enforcement departments on performing effective internet and social media screenings of officer applicants.

CA AB 446 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Pupil instruction: handwriting.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 446, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Pupil instruction: handwriting. (1) Existing law requires the adopted course of study for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, to include certain areas of study, including, among others, English, mathematics, social sciences, science, and visual and performing arts, as specified. With respect to the study of English, existing law requires that instruction to include knowledge of, and appreciation for, literature and the language, as well as the skills of speaking, reading, listening, spelling, handwriting, and composition.This bill would require handwriting instruction for grades 1 to 6, inclusive, to include instruction in cursive or joined italics in the appropriate grade levels. To the extent that this bill would impose new duties on local educational agencies, it would constitute a state-mandated local program.(2) This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 51210 of the Education Code proposed by AB 285 and SB 509 to be operative only if this bill and either or both of those bills are enacted and this bill is enacted last.(3) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 447 - David D. Cortese
Public postsecondary education: students with disabilities: inclusive college programs.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 447, as amended, Arambula. Public postsecondary education: students with disabilities: inclusive college programs. Existing law states the intent of the Legislature that public higher education in California strive to provide educationally equitable environments that give each Californian, regardless of age, economic circumstance, or certain specified characteristics, including mental disability, a reasonable opportunity to develop fully their potential.This bill, subject to an appropriation for its purposes, would expressly authorize the California State University, and request the University of California, to establish and maintain inclusive college programs for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities at 4-year public postsecondary educational institutions, as provided. The bill would request inclusive college programs operated by the California State University, and inclusive college programs operated by the University of California, to do certain things, including, among other things, provide students with a person-centered planning process and the opportunity to pursue an educational credential, including, but not limited to, a degree, certificate, or nondegree credential issued by the institution.

CA AB 448 - Juan Carrillo
Juveniles: relative placement: family finding.
09/12/2023 - In Assembly. Concurrence in Senate amendments pending.
AB 448, as amended, Juan Carrillo. Juveniles: relative placement: family finding. (1) Existing law requires a county social worker to investigate the circumstances of each child taken into temporary custody by a peace officer under specified circumstances. Existing law requires the social worker to conduct an investigation, within 30 days of the child’s removal, to identify and locate adult relatives of the child, as specified, and to provide them with a notification that the child has been removed from the custody of the child’s parents, guardians, or Indian custodian, and an explanation of the various options to participate in the care and placement of the child. This bill would require the social worker to conduct the investigation to identify and locate adult relatives, immediately, and no later than 30 days, after the child has been taken into temporary custody.(2) Existing law establishes procedures for an initial petition hearing by the juvenile court if a child is being taken into temporary custody. Existing law requires a social worker to report to the court the reasons the child was removed from the parent’s, guardian’s, or Indian custodian’s physical custody and the need, if any, for continued detention, available services, and if there are any relatives who are willing and able to take temporary physical custody of the child.This bill would additionally require the social worker to report to the court what efforts, and in the case of an Indian child, the active efforts, as defined, and findings the social worker has made to locate any relatives or kin who could provide family support or possible placement of the child or nonminor dependent and the names of those relatives or kin.(3) Existing law provides that a child may be adjudged to be a dependent of the juvenile court because of abuse or neglect, and that after this determination, the court is required to hear evidence on the question of the proper disposition to be made of the child. Existing law requires that before determining the appropriate disposition, the court receive in evidence, among other things, the social study of the child made by the social worker and evaluation made by a child advocate appointed by the court. Existing law further prescribes the information that is required to be included in that social study or evaluation, including the appropriateness of any relative placement. Existing law requires the court to review the status of every dependent child in foster care no less frequently than once every 6 months and requires a supplemental report to be filed as part of that review.This bill would additionally require the social study, and any supplemental report, to include the efforts, and in the case of an Indian child, the active efforts, as defined, and findings that the social worker has made to locate any relatives or kin who could provide family support or possible placement of the child or nonminor dependent and the name of those relatives or kin. The bill would also require the court, in conducting the periodic status review, to additionally determine whether the social worker has continued efforts, and in the case of an Indian child, the active efforts, as defined, to locate any relatives or kin who could provide family support or possible placement of the child and the names of those relatives or kin.(4) Existing law requires a probation officer, upon delivery of a minor who has been taken into temporary custody, to immediately investigate the circumstances of the minor and the facts surrounding the minor being taken into custody and to immediately release the minor to the custody of their parent, legal guardian, or responsible relative, including a grandparent, adult sibling, or other relative, unless evidence before the court demonstrates that continuance in the home is contrary to the child’s welfare, as specified.This bill would additionally require that the probation officer, if it is known or there is reason to know the child

CA AB 452 - Buffy Wicks
Childhood sexual assault: statute of limitations.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 79. Noes 1.).
AB 452, as amended, Addis. Childhood sexual assault: statute of limitations. Existing law requires that specified actions for recovery of damages suffered as a result of childhood sexual assault, as defined, be commenced within 22 years of the date the plaintiff attains the age of majority or within 5 years of the date the plaintiff discovers or reasonably should have discovered that psychological injury or illness occurring after the age of majority was caused by the sexual assault, whichever occurs later. Existing law prohibits certain of those actions from commencing on or after the plaintiff’s 40th birthday unless the person or entity knew or had reason to know, or was otherwise on notice, of any misconduct that creates a risk of childhood sexual assault by an employee, volunteer, representative, or agent, or the person or entity failed to take reasonable steps or to implement reasonable safeguards to avoid acts of childhood sexual assault, as specified. Existing law revives claims that would otherwise have been barred as of January 1, 2020, because the applicable statute of limitations, claim presentation deadline, or any other time limit had expired and authorizes the claims to be commenced within specified time periods.This bill would eliminate time limits for the commencement of actions for the recovery of damages suffered as a result of childhood sexual assault, as specified. The bill would eliminate the prohibition on certain actions proceeding on or after the plaintiff’s 40th birthday unless specified conditions are met. The bill would specify that its provisions apply to any claim arising on and after January 1, 2024.

CA AB 455 - Diane Papan
Firearms: prohibited persons.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 455, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Firearms: prohibited persons. Existing law prohibits a person who has been convicted of a felony offense or a specified misdemeanor domestic violence offense from possessing or receiving a firearm. Existing law prohibits a person who has been convicted of specified misdemeanor offenses within the previous 10 years from possessing or receiving a firearm. Existing law prohibits a person who has been taken into custody because that person is a danger to themselves or others, or has been certified for intensive treatment due to a mental disorder or mental illness, from possessing or receiving a firearm, as specified. Existing law prohibits a person who has been placed under conservatorship by a court, has been found mentally incompetent to stand trial, has been found not guilty of specified crimes due to reason of insanity, has been adjudicated by a court to be a danger to others as a result of a mental disorder or mental illness, or who has been adjudicated to be a mentally disordered sex offender from possessing or receiving a firearm, as specified. A violation of any of the prohibitions is punishable as a crime.Existing law authorizes a court to grant pretrial diversion, for a period no longer than 2 years, to a defendant suffering from a mental disorder, on an accusatory pleading alleging the commission of a misdemeanor or felony offense, in order to allow the defendant to undergo mental health treatment.This bill would, on July 1, 2024, authorize the prosecution to request an order from the court, as specified, to prohibit a defendant subject to pretrial diversion from owning or possessing a firearm because they are a danger to themselves or others until they successfully complete diversion or their firearm rights are restored, as specified.By expanding the application of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1001.36 of the Penal Code proposed by AB 1412 to be operative only if this bill and AB 1412 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 456 - Brian K. Maienschein
Public postsecondary education: campus mental health hotlines: report.
01/29/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 456, as amended, Maienschein. Public postsecondary education: campus mental health hotlines: report. Existing law establishes the California State University and the California Community Colleges as 2 of the 3 segments of public postsecondary education in the state. Existing law requires each campus of the California State University and the California Community Colleges, and requests each campus of the University of California, with a campus mental health hotline to have printed on either side of student identification cards the telephone number of the campus mental health hotline for a student identification card issued to a student on or after January 1, 2023, as specified. Existing law also requires each campus of the California State University and the California Community Colleges, and requests each campus of the University of California, without a campus mental health hotline to have printed on either side of student identification cards the telephone number of their city’s or county’s mental health hotline for a student identification card issued to a student on or after January 1, 2023, as specified.This bill would require the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges and the Chancellor of the California State University, on or before January 1, 2026, to develop a plan to make a campus mental health hotline that is operated by an organization with expertise in student mental health available to students on their respective campuses. The bill would require the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges and the Chancellor of the California State University, on or before January 1, 2026, to each submit a report to the Legislature on the above-mentioned plan, as provided. The bill would repeal its provisions on January 1, 2027.

CA AB 459 - Matt Haney
Contracts against public policy: personal or professional services: digital replicas.
09/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on RLS.
AB 459, as amended,  Kalra. Contracts against public policy: personal or professional services: digital replicas. Existing law prohibits an employer from requiring an employee or applicant for employment to agree, in writing, to any term or condition that is known by the employer to be illegal. Existing law provides that certain contractual agreements between an employer and employee are against public policy, including specified provisions affecting an employee’s membership in a labor organization and the protection of state law in employment. Under existing law, enforcement of state labor laws is generally committed to the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement within the Department of Industrial Relations, under the direction of the Labor Commissioner.This bill would provide that a provision in an agreement between an individual and any other person for the performance of personal or professional services is contrary to public policy and deemed unconscionable if the provision meets specified conditions relating to the use of a digital replica of the voice or likeness of an individual in lieu of the work of the individual or to train a generative artificial intelligence system. The bill would provide that it shall apply retroactively. The bill would require any person who is currently under, or has entered into, an agreement with an individual performing personal or professional services containing such a provision, by February 1, 2024, to notify that individual in writing that the provision is unenforceable.

CA AB 464 - Pilar Schiavo
Public documents: driver’s licenses and vital records.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 464, Schiavo. Public documents: driver’s licenses and vital records. Existing law requires the collection of specified fees for certified copies of a birth certificate, marriage record, or marriage dissolution record. Existing law imposes fees upon the application for an original class C or M driver’s license or a renewal of a driver’s license or for a license to operate a different class of vehicle, as described.This bill would instead exempt persons who are recipients of specified assistance programs from payment of a fee for certified copies of a birth certificate, marriage record, or marriage dissolution record. The bill would, beginning July 1, 2027, also exempt a person who can verify their status as a homeless person or homeless child or youth from payment of a fee upon the application for an original or renewal of a driver’s license. The bill would require the verification of homeless status to be subject to regulations adopted by the Department of Motor Vehicles and may be made by a homeless services provider, as defined. By establishing an exemption as to fees paid for receipt of certified copies of vital records, this bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would make all these provisions operative only to the extent that funding is provided by express reference for these purposes.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 486 - Ash Kalra
Long-term health facilities: citation appeals.
07/11/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 486, as amended, Kalra. Long-term health facilities: citation appeals. The Long-Term Care, Health, Safety, and Security Act of 1973 generally requires the State Department of Public Health to license and regulate long-term health care facilities and to establish an inspection and reporting system to ensure that long-term health care facilities are in compliance with state statutes and regulations. The act divides violations into classes AA, A, and B, depending on the severity and probability of the harm resulting or that could result from the violation.Under existing law, if a licensee decides to contest a class “AA” or “A” citation, the licensee is required, within 15 business days of the service of the citation, to inform the director of the licensee’s intent to adjudicate the validity of the violation in the superior court, and to file that action within 90 days, as specified. Existing law requires a licensee who desires to contest a class “B” citation to, within 15 working days after service of the citation, notify the director or the director’s designee that the licensee wishes to appeal the citation through specified department administrative adjudicatory procedures, or elects to submit the matter to binding arbitration through the American Arbitration Association.This bill would delete the civil action provisions for contesting a class “AA” or “A” citation, and would make those citation classifications subject to the administrative proceedings applicable for contesting a class “B” citation. The bill would authorize an administrative law judge to affirm, modify, or dismiss a citation, the class of a citation, or the proposed penalty. The bill would authorize a licensee to seek judicial review of an administrative law judge’s decision. The bill would make related conforming changes and various technical, nonsubstantive changes. Notwithstanding those provisions, the bill would delay application of its changes with respect to contesting class “AA”and class “A” citations with respect to the Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center as specified, until the earlier of January 1, 2025, or 30 days after the facility provides documentation to the department regarding its recertification to participate in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs. Until that time, the bill would authorize the facility to appeal class “AA” and class “A” citations to the superior court in the same manner as provided under existing law, as specified. The bill would repeal that authorization on January 1, 2026.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center in the City and County of San Francisco.

CA AB 488 - Stephanie Nguyen
Medi-Cal: skilled nursing facilities: vision loss.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 488, as introduced, Stephanie Nguyen. Medi-Cal: skilled nursing facilities: vision loss. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law requires the department, subject to any necessary federal approvals, for managed care rating periods that begin between January 1, 2023, and December 31, 2026, inclusive, to establish and implement the Workforce and Quality Incentive Program under which a network provider furnishing skilled nursing facility services to a Medi-Cal managed care enrollee may earn performance-based directed payments from the Medi-Cal managed care plan with which they contract, as specified. Existing law, subject to an appropriation, requires the department to set the amounts of those directed payments under a specified formula.Existing law requires the department to establish the methodology or methodologies, parameters, and eligibility criteria for the directed payments, including the milestones and metrics that network providers of skilled nursing facility services must meet in order to receive a directed payment from a Medi-Cal managed care plan, with at least 2 of these milestones and metrics tied to workforce measures.This bill would require that the measures and milestones include program access, staff training, and capital improvement measures aimed at addressing the needs of skilled nursing facility residents with vision loss. The bill would make related legislative findings.

CA AB 492 - Gail Pellerin
Medi-Cal: reproductive and behavioral health integration pilot programs.
06/14/2023 - Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 492, as amended, Pellerin. Medi-Cal: reproductive and behavioral health integration pilot programs. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services, including comprehensive perinatal services, among other reproductive health services, and specialty or nonspecialty mental health services and substance use disorder services, among other behavioral health services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law establishes the Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment (Family PACT) Program pursuant to a federal waiver, as part of the schedule of Medi-Cal benefits. Under existing law, the Family PACT Program provides comprehensive clinical family planning services to a person who has a family income at or below 200% of the federal poverty level and who is eligible to receive those services pursuant to the waiver. Under the Family PACT Program, comprehensive clinical family planning services include, among other things, contraception and general reproductive health care, and exclude abortion. Abortion services are covered under the Medi-Cal program.This bill would, on or before July 1, 2024, subject to an appropriation, require the department to make grants, incentive payments, or other financial support available to Medi-Cal managed care plans to develop and implement reproductive and behavioral health integration pilot programs in partnership with identified qualified providers, in order to improve access to behavioral health services for beneficiaries with mild-to-moderate behavioral health conditions.The bill would define “qualified provider” as a Medi-Cal provider that is enrolled in the Family PACT Program and that provides abortion- and contraception-related services. For funding eligibility, the bill would require a Medi-Cal managed care plan to identify the qualified providers and the services that will be provided through the pilot program, as specified.The bill would, on or before July 1, 2024, subject to an appropriation, require the department to make grants or other financial support available to qualified providers for reproductive and behavioral health integration pilot programs, in order to support development and expansion of services, infrastructure, and capacity for the integration of behavioral health services for beneficiaries with mild-to-moderate behavioral health conditions.For funding eligibility, the bill would require a qualified provider to identify both the patient population or gap in access to care and the types of services provided, as specified.The bill would require the department to convene a working group, with a certain composition, to develop criteria for evaluating applications and awarding funding, to conduct an evaluation of the pilot programs, and to submit a report to the Legislature, as specified.

CA AB 5 - Rick Chavez Zbur
The Safe and Supportive Schools Act.
09/11/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 65. Noes 0.).
AB 5, as amended, Zbur. The Safe and Supportive Schools Act. Existing law establishes the system of public elementary and secondary schools in this state and provides for the establishment of local educational agencies to operate these schools and provide instruction to pupils. Existing law states the policy of the State of California to afford all persons in public schools, regardless of their disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other specified characteristic, equal rights and opportunities in the educational institutions of the state. Existing law requires, no later than July 1, 2021, the State Department of Education to develop resources or, as appropriate, update existing resources for in-service training on schoolsite and community resources for the support of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) pupils, and strategies to increase support for LGBTQ pupils, as specified. Existing law encourages schools operated by a school district or county office of education and charter schools to use those resources to provide training at least once every 2 years to teachers and other certificated employees of those schools that serve pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive.This bill would require the State Department of Education, on or before July 1, 2025, to finalize the development of an online training delivery platform and an online training curriculum to support LGBTQ cultural competency training for teachers and other certificated employees, as specified. The bill would delete the above-described encouragement and instead would require, commencing with the 2025–26 school year and ending with the completion of the 2029–30 school year, each local educational agency, as defined, serving pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to use the online training delivery platform and curriculum, or an in-service alternative, to provide at least one hour of required training annually to teachers and other certificated employees at those schools, as provided. The bill would require each local educational agency to maintain records documenting the training, as provided. The bill would require the department to monitor compliance with the training requirement as part of the department’s annual compliance monitoring of state and federal programs. The bill would require the department, within 9 months of the completion of the 5-year training period, to report data from that compliance monitoring to the Legislature, and post the report on the department’s internet website, as provided. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require these provisions to be known as the Safe and Supportive Schools Act. This bill would make these requirements inoperative on July 1, 2031, and would repeal them as of January 1, 2032.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 505 - Philip Y. Ting
The Office of Youth and Community Restoration.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 505, as amended, Ting. The Office of Youth and Community Restoration. (1) Existing law creates the Office of Youth and Community Restoration within the California Health and Human Services Agency to promote trauma-responsive, culturally informed services for youth involved in the juvenile justice system, as specified. Existing law grants the office the responsibility and authority to report on youth outcomes, identify policy recommendations, identify and disseminate best practices, and provide technical assistance to develop and expand local youth diversion opportunities.Existing law requires the office to have an ombudsperson and authorizes the ombudspersons to, among other things, investigate complaints from youth and access facilities serving youth involved in the juvenile justice system with advanced notice of a minimum of 48 hours to the agency in control of the facility. Existing law requires the ombudsperson to publish and provide regular reports to the Legislature regarding data collected concerning, among other things, investigations performed by the ombudsperson.This bill would authorize an ombudsperson to access a facility at any time without prior notice to the operator of the facility. The bill would require the ombudsperson to have access to, review, receive, and make copies of any record of a local agency, including all juvenile facility records at all times, expect as otherwise prohibited. The bill would authorize the ombudsperson to meet or communicate privately with any youth, personnel, or volunteer in a juvenile facility and interview any relevant witnesses. The bill would authorize the ombudsperson to interview sworn probation personnel in accordance with applicable federal and state law, local probation department policies, and collective bargaining agreements. The bill would require the ombudsperson to be granted access to youth at all times, and would require the ombudsperson to be able to take notes, audio or video recording, or photographs during the meeting or communication with youth, to the extent not otherwise prohibited by applicable federal or state law. The bill would also require the ombudsperson to include recommendations for improving the juvenile justice system in their regular reports regarding data annually collected and made publicly available on the office’s internet website. (2) Existing law establishes the Board of State and Community Corrections, with the mission of providing statewide leadership, coordination, and technical assistance to promote effective state and local efforts and partnerships in California’s adult and juvenile criminal justice system. Existing law requires the judge of the juvenile court of a county to inspect any jail, juvenile hall, or special purpose juvenile hall that was used for the confinement of a juvenile for more than 24 hours in the preceding calendar year, as specified. Existing law requires the court to notify the operator of the facility of any observed noncompliance, and make a finding of suitability of the facility for the confinement of juveniles. Existing law requires the board to conduct a biennial inspection of each jail, juvenile hall, lockup, special purpose juvenile hall, camp, ranch, or secure youth treatment facility, as specified.This bill would additionally require a judge of the juvenile court to inspect any lockup, camp, ranch, or secure youth treatment facility that was used for the confinement of any juvenile for more than 24 hours in the preceding calendar year, as specified.(3) Existing law generally provides for the confidentiality of information regarding a minor in proceedings in the juvenile court and related court proceedings and limits access to juvenile case files. Existing law authorizes only certain individuals to inspect a juvenile case file, including, among others, the minor, the minor’s parents or guardian, and the attorneys for the parties. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to disseminate information obtained pu

CA AB 512 - Marie Waldron
Mental health and substance use disorders: database of facilities.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 512, as amended, Waldron. Mental health and substance use disorders: database of facilities. Existing law establishes a system of mental health programs, largely administered through the counties, to provide mental health and substance use disorder services in the state. Existing law regulates the facilities that provide these services, including acute psychiatric hospitals, residential substance abuse treatment facilities, and outpatient programs.This bill would require that, by July 1, 2024, the California Health and Human Services Agency, either on its own or through the Behavioral Health Task Force established by the Governor, create an ad hoc committee to study how to develop a real-time, internet-based system, usable by hospitals, clinics, law enforcement, paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs), and other health care providers as deemed appropriate, to display information about available beds in inpatient psychiatric facilities, crisis stabilization units, residential community mental health facilities, and residential alcoholism or substance abuse treatment facilities in order to facilitate the identification and designation of available facilities for the transfer to, and temporary treatment of, individuals in mental health or substance use disorder crisis. The ad hoc committee shall submit a report of its findings to the Legislature no later than July 1, 2025.

CA AB 524 - Buffy Wicks
Discrimination: family caregiver status.
01/29/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 524, Wicks. Discrimination: family caregiver status. Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), which is enforced by the Civil Rights Department, prohibits various forms of employment discrimination and recognizes the opportunity to seek, obtain, and hold employment without specified forms of discrimination as a civil right. The act also makes it an unlawful employment practice for an employer, among other things, to refuse to hire or employ a person because of various personal characteristics, conditions, or traits.This bill would prohibit employment discrimination on account of family caregiver status, as defined, and would recognize the opportunity to seek, obtain, and hold employment without discrimination because of family caregiver status as a civil right, as specified.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 12926 of the Government Code proposed by SB 403 to be operative only if this bill and SB 403 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 531 - Richard Dale Roth
The Behavioral Health Infrastructure Bond Act of 2023.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 531, Irwin. The Behavioral Health Infrastructure Bond Act of 2023. Existing law establishes the Multifamily Housing Program administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development. Existing law requires assistance for projects under the program to be provided in the form of deferred payment loans to pay for eligible costs of specified types of development, as provided. Existing law requires that specified funds appropriated to provide housing for individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness and who are inherently impacted by or at increased risk for medical diseases or conditions due to the COVID-19 pandemic or other communicable diseases be disbursed in accordance with the Multifamily Housing Program for specified uses.The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report on a project that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. CEQA does not apply to the approval of ministerial projects. Existing law, until July 1, 2024, exempts from CEQA a project funded to provide housing for individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness, as described above, if certain requirements are satisfied, including if the project proponent obtains an enforceable commitment to use a skilled and trained workforce for any proposed rehabilitation, construction, or major alterations, as specified.This bill would provide that projects funded by the Behavioral Health Infrastructure Bond Act of 2024 that provide housing for individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness and who are inherently impacted by or at increased risk for medical diseases or conditions due to the COVID-19 pandemic or other communicable diseases and are disbursed in accordance with the Multifamily Housing Program, or projects that are disbursed in accordance with the Behavioral Health Continuum Infrastructure Program, are a use by right and subject to the streamlined, ministerial review process. The bill would define use by right for these purposes to mean that the local government’s review of the project does not require a conditional use permit, planned unit development permit, or other discretionary local government review or approval that would constitute a project subject to the approval process in CEQA.Because the bill would revise the approval process of specified projects, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law authorizes the State Department of Health Care Services to, subject to an appropriation, establish a Behavioral Health Continuum Infrastructure Program to award grants as specified for the construction, acquisition, and rehabilitation of behavioral health treatment resources, as described. Existing law repeals this program on January 1, 2027.This bill would continue that program indefinitely.Existing law, the Bronzan-McCorquodale Act, contains provisions governing the operation and financing of community mental health services in every county through locally administered and locally controlled community mental health programs. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 in the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the Mental Health Services Fund to fund various county mental health programs.This bill would enact the Behavioral Health Infrastructure Bond Act of 2024 which, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $6,380,000,000 to finance loans or grants for the acquisition of capital assets for the conversion, rehabilitation, or new construction of permanent supportive housing for veterans and others who are homeless and meet

CA AB 551 - Steve Bennett
Medi-Cal: specialty mental health services: foster children.
07/05/2023 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (July 3). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 551, as amended, Bennett. Medi-Cal: specialty mental health services: foster children. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services (department), under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Under existing law, specialty mental health services include federal Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services provided to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries under 21 years of age. Existing law requires each local mental health plan to establish a procedure to ensure access to outpatient specialty mental health services, as required by the EPSDT program standards, for youth in foster care who have been placed outside their county of adjudication, as described.Existing law requires the department to issue policy guidance on the conditions for, and exceptions to, presumptive transfer of responsibility for providing or arranging for specialty mental health services to a foster youth from the county of original jurisdiction to the county in which the foster youth resides, as prescribed. On a case-by-case basis, and when consistent with the medical rights of children in foster care, existing law authorizes the waiver of presumptive transfer, with the responsibility for the provision of specialty mental health services remaining with the county of original jurisdiction if certain exceptions exist. Under existing law, the county probation agency or the child welfare services agency is responsible for determining whether waiver of the presumptive transfer is appropriate, with notice provided to the person requesting the exception.Under existing law, commencing July 1, 2023, in the case of placement of foster children in short-term residential therapeutic programs, community treatment facilities, or group homes, or in the case of admission of foster children to children’s crisis residential programs, the county of original jurisdiction is required to retain responsibility and presumptive transfer provisions apply only if certain circumstances exist.This bill, for purposes of foster children placed or admitted in those specific settings, would delay, until July 1, 2024, the requirement on the county of original jurisdiction to retain responsibility and the limitation on the presumptive transfer provisions. By extending the period during which a county agency is responsible for making determinations about presumptive transfer waivers and making certain notifications, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law conditions implementation of the above-described provisions on the availability of federal financial participation and receipt of all necessary federal approvals. If the department makes the determination that it is necessary to seek federal approval, existing law requires the department to make an official request for approval from the federal government no later than July 1, 2024.This bill would delay the deadline for any necessary federal approval requests to July 1, 2025.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA AB 555 - Juan Carrillo
California state preschool programs: reimbursement amounts: adjustment factors.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 555, as amended, Juan Carrillo. California state preschool programs: reimbursement amounts: adjustment factors. Existing law, the Early Education Act, among other things, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to administer all California state preschool programs, including, but not limited to, part-day and full-day age and developmentally appropriate programs for 3- and 4-year-old children. Existing law requires each state preschool program applicant or contracting agency to give priority for part-day and full-day programs according to a specified priority ranking. Existing law requires the 3rd priority for services to be given to eligible 4-year-old children who are not enrolled in a state-funded transitional kindergarten program and requires the 4th priority to be given to eligible 3-year-old children.This bill would instead require the 3rd priority for services to be given to eligible 3- and 4-year old children who are not enrolled in a state-funded transitional kindergarten program, and would revise the remaining priorities accordingly.Existing law requires the State Department of Education, in collaboration with the State Department of Social Services, to implement a reimbursement system plan that establishes reasonable standards and assigned reimbursement rates, which vary with the length of the program year and the hours of service, for purposes of the act. Existing law requires those contractors who, as of December 31, 2021, received the established?standard reimbursement rate to be reimbursed at the greater of the 75th percentile of the?2018?regional market rate survey or the contract per-child reimbursement amount as of December 31, 2021, as increased by a specified cost-of-living adjustment.This bill would instead require, for a contract whose period of performance begins on and after July 1, 2023, the contract reimbursement to be based on the lesser of the maximum reimbursable amount stated in the contract, the net reimbursable program costs, or the product of the adjusted child days of enrollment for certified children times the contract rate set forth in the above-described provisions. Existing law establishes adjustment factors to reflect the additional expense of serving full-day and part-day preschool children who have exceptional needs, are being provided with early childhood mental health consultation services, or are 47 months or younger, as provided. Existing law additionally establishes adjustment factors to reflect the additional expense of serving full-day preschool children who are at risk of neglect, abuse, or exploitation or who are dual language learners. Existing law prohibits days of enrollment for children who meet more than one of the criteria eligible for adjustment from being reported under more than one of those categories. This bill would, on and after July 1, 2024, additionally apply those adjustment factors for children who are at risk of neglect, abuse, or exploitation or who are dual language learners to part-day preschool children. The bill would also eliminate the prohibition on reporting children under more than one of the above-specified categories eligible for adjustment and make conforming changes.

CA AB 557 - Gregg Hart
Open meetings: local agencies: teleconferences.
09/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 557, Hart. Open meetings: local agencies: teleconferences. (1) Existing law, the Ralph M. Brown Act, requires, with specified exceptions, that all meetings of a legislative body of a local agency, as those terms are defined, be open and public and that all persons be permitted to attend and participate. The act contains specified provisions regarding providing for the ability of the public to observe and provide comment. The act allows for meetings to occur via teleconferencing subject to certain requirements, particularly that the legislative body notice each teleconference location of each member that will be participating in the public meeting, that each teleconference location be accessible to the public, that members of the public be allowed to address the legislative body at each teleconference location, that the legislative body post an agenda at each teleconference location, and that at least a quorum of the legislative body participate from locations within the boundaries of the local agency’s jurisdiction. The act provides an exemption to the jurisdictional requirement for health authorities, as defined.Existing law, until January 1, 2024, authorizes the legislative body of a local agency to use teleconferencing without complying with those specified teleconferencing requirements in specified circumstances when a declared state of emergency is in effect. Those circumstances are that (1) state or local officials have imposed or recommended measures to promote social distancing, (2) the legislative body is meeting for the purpose of determining whether, as a result of the emergency, meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees, or (3) the legislative body has previously made that determination. If there is a continuing state of emergency, or if state or local officials have imposed or recommended measures to promote social distancing, existing law requires a legislative body to make specified findings not later than 30 days after the first teleconferenced meeting, and to make those findings every 30 days thereafter, in order to continue to meet under these abbreviated teleconferencing procedures.Existing law requires a legislative body that holds a teleconferenced meeting under these abbreviated teleconferencing procedures to give notice of the meeting and post agendas, as described, to allow members of the public to access the meeting and address the legislative body, to give notice of the means by which members of the public may access the meeting and offer public comment, including an opportunity for all persons to attend via a call-in option or an internet-based service option. Existing law prohibits a legislative body that holds a teleconferenced meeting under these abbreviated teleconferencing procedures from requiring public comments to be submitted in advance of the meeting and would specify that the legislative body must provide an opportunity for the public to address the legislative body and offer comment in real time.This bill would revise the authority of a legislative body to hold a teleconference meeting under those abbreviated teleconferencing procedures when a declared state of emergency is in effect. Specifically, the bill would extend indefinitely that authority in the circumstances under which the legislative body either (1) meets for the purpose of determining whether, as a result of the emergency, meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees, or (2) has previously made that determination. The bill would also extend the period for a legislative body to make the above-described findings related to a continuing state of emergency to not later than 45 days after the first teleconferenced meeting, and every 45 days thereafter, in order to continue to meet under the abbreviated teleconferencing procedures.The bill would additionally make nonsubstantive changes to those provisions and correct erroneous cross-references.(2) T

CA AB 56 - Thomas W. Lackey
Victim’s compensation: emotional injuries.
09/13/2023 - In Assembly. Ordered to Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 56, as amended, Lackey. Victim’s compensation: emotional injuries. Existing law generally provides for the compensation of victims and derivative victims of specified types of crimes by the California Victim Compensation Board from the Restitution Fund, a continuously appropriated fund, for specified losses suffered as a result of those crimes, including emotional injuries where the crime was a violation of specified provisions.This bill would expand eligibility for compensation to include emotional injuries from felony violations of, among other things, attempted murder, rape and sexual assault, mayhem, and stalking.By expanding the authorization for the use of moneys in the continuously appropriated Restitution Fund, this bill would make an appropriation.

CA AB 578 - Marc Berman
Multifamily Housing Program: No Place Like Home Program.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 578, as amended, Berman. Multifamily Housing Program: No Place Like Home Program. (1) Existing law requires the Department of Housing and Community Development to administer various programs intended to promote the development of housing, including the Multifamily Housing Program, pursuant to which the department provides financial assistance in the form of deferred payment loans to pay for the eligible costs of development for specified activities.Under existing law, the principal and accumulated interest of a loan issued under the Multifamily Housing Program is due and payable upon the completion of the term of the loan. Existing law prohibits the amount of the required loan payments from exceeding 0.42% per annum for the first 30 years of the loan term.This bill would prohibit, for the first 30 years of the loan term, the amount of the required loan payments from exceeding 0.42% per annum or $260 per assisted unit, whichever is less. The bill would authorize the department to adjust the $260 cap for inflation based on the California Consumer Price Index, as specified.(2) Existing law, known as the No Place Like Home Program, requires the Department of Housing and Community Development to award $2,000,000,000 among counties to finance capital costs, including, but not limited to, acquisition, design, construction, rehabilitation, or preservation, and to capitalize operating reserves, of permanent supportive housing for the target population, as specified. Existing law establishes the No Place Like Home Fund, requires specified moneys to be deposited in the fund, and continuously appropriates moneys in the fund for the program. Existing law requires loans for capital costs made by the department under the program to be in the form of secured deferred payment loans to pay for the eligible costs of development. Existing law prohibits the amount of the required loan payments from exceeding 0.42% per annum for the first 15 years of the loan term.This bill would prohibit, for the first 15 years of the loan term, the amount of the required loan payments from exceeding 0.42% per annum or $260 per assisted unit, whichever is less. The bill would authorize the department to adjust the $260 cap for inflation based on the California Consumer Price Index, as specified.The No Place Like Home Program was ratified and amended by the No Place Like Home Act of 2018, approved by the voters as Proposition 2 at the November 6, 2018, statewide general election. Existing law authorizes the Legislature to amend Proposition 2 by a 2/3 vote, so long as the amendment is consistent with and furthers the intent of that measure.The bill would state the finding of the Legislature that these provisions are consistent with, and further the intent of, the No Place Like Home Act of 2018.

CA AB 58 - Ash Kalra
Deferred entry of judgment pilot program.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 58, as amended, Kalra. Deferred entry of judgment pilot program. Existing law authorizes, until January 1, 2024, the Counties of Alameda, Butte, Napa, Nevada, Santa Clara, and Ventura to establish a pilot program to operate a deferred entry of judgment program for eligible defendants. Existing law authorizes a defendant to participate in the program within the county’s juvenile hall if that person is charged with committing a felony offense, except as specified, pleads guilty to the charge or charges, and the probation department determines that the person meets prescribed requirements, including that the defendant meets the age requirements. Existing law requires each participating county to establish a multidisciplinary team to meet periodically to review and discuss the implementation, practices, and impact of the program, and to submit data on the pilot program to the Board of State and Community Corrections. Existing law requires the board to conduct an evaluation of the pilot program’s impact and effectiveness, as specified, and would require, no later than December 31, 2022, the evaluation to be combined into a comprehensive report and submitted to the Assembly and Senate Committees on Public Safety.This bill would remove the Counties of Napa and Ventura from the counties authorized to establish a pilot program. The bill would extend the pilot program to January 1, 2026, and would instead require, no later than December 31, 2024, counties to conduct the above-specified evaluation and to submit a report based on that evaluation to the Assembly and Senate Committees on Public Safety.

CA AB 583 - Buffy Wicks
Birthing Justice for California Families Pilot Project.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 583, as amended, Wicks. Birthing Justice for California Families Pilot Project. Existing law establishes the Department of Health Care Access and Information, which administers, among other programs, the California Reproductive Health Equity Program to ensure abortion and contraception services are affordable for and accessible to all patients and to provide financial support for safety net providers of these services. Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services pursuant to a schedule of benefits. Existing law requires the department to convene a workgroup to examine the implementation of the Medi-Cal doula benefit, as specified, and, no later than July 1, 2024, to publish a report that addresses the number of Medi-Cal recipients utilizing doula services and identifies barriers that impede access to doula services, among other things. This bill would establish the Birthing Justice for California Families Pilot Project, which would include a 3-year grant program administered by the Department of Health Care Access and Information to provide grants to specified entities, including community-based doula groups, to provide full-spectrum doula care to pregnant and birthing people who are low income and do not qualify for Medi-Cal or who are from communities that experience high rates of negative birth outcomes. The bill would require the department to take specified actions with regard to awarding grants, including awarding grants to selected entities on or before January 1, 2025. The bill would require a grant recipient to use grants funds to pay for the costs associated with providing full-spectrum doula care to eligible individuals and establishing and managing doula services. The bill would require a grant recipient, in setting the payment rate for a doula being paid with grant funds, to comply with specified parameters, including that the payment rate not be less than the Medi-Cal reimbursement rate for doulas or the median rate paid for doula care in existing local pilot projects providing doula care in California, whichever is higher. The bill would require the department, on or before January 1, 2028, to submit a report to the appropriate policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature on the expenditure of funds and relevant outcome data for the pilot project. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2029.

CA AB 597 - Freddie Rodriguez
Workers’ compensation: first responders: post-traumatic stress.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 597, as amended, Rodriguez. Workers’ compensation: first responders: post-traumatic stress. Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in the course of employment. Existing law provides, until January 1, 2029, that, for certain state and local firefighting personnel and peace officers, the term “injury” includes post-traumatic stress that develops or manifests during a period in which the injured person is in the service of the department or unit. Existing law requires the compensation awarded pursuant to this provision to include full hospital, surgical, medical treatment, disability indemnity, and death benefits.This bill would, for injuries occurring on or after January 1, 2025, make that provision applicable to emergency medical technicians and paramedics, as defined.

CA AB 599 - Christopher M. Ward
Suspensions and expulsions: tobacco.
07/05/2023 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (July 5). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 599, as amended, Ward. Suspensions and expulsions: tobacco. Existing law prohibits a pupil from being suspended from school or recommended for expulsion, unless the superintendent of the school district or the principal of the school in which the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil has committed a specified act, including, among other acts, that the pupil possessed or used tobacco, or products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, vaping products, and betel.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2025, remove having possessed or used tobacco, or products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, vaping products, and betel from the list of acts for which a pupil, regardless of their grade of enrollment, may be suspended or recommended for expulsion for. The bill would, commencing July 1, 2025, prohibit a charter school pupil in kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, from being suspended or recommended for expulsion solely on the basis of those acts.Existing law requires the principal or superintendent of schools to recommend the expulsion of a pupil for certain acts committed at school or at a school activity off school grounds, including, among others, the unlawful possession of certain controlled substances, unless the principal or superintendent determines that expulsion should not be recommended under the circumstances or that an alternative means of correction would address the conduct.This bill, commencing July 1, 2025, would instead no longer require the principal or superintendent of schools to recommend the expulsion of a pupil for the unlawful possession of certain controlled substances under any circumstance.This bill would require the State Department of Education, on or before July 1, 2025, to develop and make available a model policy for a public health approach to addressing pupil possession and use of illicit drugs on school property, as specified. The bill would require the department to collaborate with stakeholders, including treatment providers, local educational agencies, and community-based organizations in the development of the model policy. The bill would require local educational agencies, as defined, to adopt, on or before July 1, 2025, a plan to address pupils who possess or use drugs on school property. The bill would require the plan to be youth-informed, reduce criminalization, and to include specific information on where on campus and in the community pupils can receive education, treatment, or support for substance abuse. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would also make Legislative findings and declarations relating to these provisions, make conforming changes, and delete obsolete provisions.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 60 - Isaac G. Bryan
Restorative justice program.
09/12/2023 - In Assembly. Ordered to Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 60, as amended, Bryan. Restorative justice program. Existing law establishes specified rights for victims and witnesses of crimes, including to be notified or informed regarding specified court proceedings and inmate placement or parole eligibility. Existing law requires the Attorney General to, by June 1, 2025, create and distribute a “Victim Protections and Resources” card, which contains information about victim rights and resources, as specified.This bill would give a victim the right to be notified of the availability of community-based restorative justice programs and processes available to them, including programs serving their community, county, county jails, juvenile detention facilities, and the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, as specified. The bill would additionally require the Attorney General to include this information in the “Victim Protections and Resources” card, as specified.Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which may adjudge a minor or nonminor to be a dependent or ward of the court under certain circumstances. Existing law requires the probation officer to inform the victim of a crime in a juvenile proceeding of the final disposition of the case and of any victim-offender conferencing program or victim impact class available in the county.This bill would remove the requirement that the victim be notified of a victim-offender conferencing program, but would require the victim to be notified of the availability of community-based restorative justice programs and processes available to them. By increasing the duties of probation officers, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 61 - Isaac G. Bryan
Criminal procedure: arraignment.
06/01/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Assembly Member Bryan.
AB 61, as amended, Bryan. Criminal procedure: arraignment. Existing law requires a person, once arrested, to be taken before a magistrate without delay and, in any event, within 48 hours after arrest, not including weekends and holidays, as specified.This bill would remove the weekends and holidays exemption, thereby requiring a person to be taken before the court within 48 hours of their arrest, or to be released, except that if the 48-hour period expires at a time that the court is in session, the arraignment can occur anytime that day.Existing law requires a person arrested without a warrant to be taken before the nearest magistrate in the county in which the offense is triable without delay. Existing law also authorizes a peace officer to release the arrested person from custody instead of taking them before a magistrate under certain specified circumstances, including if the person was arrested for intoxication only. This bill would require the person to be taken before the magistrate within 48 hours of their arrest. This bill would require that the court make an initial determination of probable cause, as specified, no more than 48 hours after the warrantless arrest. The bill would also require that if the court makes an initial finding of no probable cause, the court order the person to be released immediately.Existing law similarly requires a juvenile that has been arrested to be released with 48 hours, excluding judicial holidays, unless a petition has been filed to make the minor a ward of the court or charges have been filed charging the minor as an adult.This bill would remove the judicial holidays exemption and the petition exemption and would instead prohibit any juvenile from being held more than 48 hours if they did not receive an initial judicial determination of probable cause. By imposing a higher level of service on prosecutors, public defenders, police, jails, and courthouses, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 614 - James D. Wood
Medi-Cal.
09/30/2023 - Approved by the Governor.
AB 614, Wood. Medi-Cal. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.This bill would make a change to an obsolete reference to the former Healthy Families Program, whose health services for children have been transitioned to the Medi-Cal program. The bill would make a change to an obsolete reference to the former Access for Infants and Mothers Program and would revise a related provision to instead refer to the successor Medi-Cal Access Program. The bill would delete, within certain Medi-Cal provisions, obsolete references to a repealed provision relating to nonprofit hospital service plans.Existing law establishes, under Medi-Cal, the County Health Initiative Matching Fund, a program administered by the department, through which an applicant county, county agency, local initiative, or county organized health system that provides an intergovernmental transfer, as specified, is authorized to submit a proposal to the department for funding for the purpose of providing comprehensive health insurance coverage to certain children. The program is sometimes known as the County Children’s Health Initiative Program (CCHIP).This bill would revise certain provisions to rename that program as CCHIP.Existing law requires the Director of Health Care Services to enter into contracts with managed care plans under Medi-Cal and related provisions, including health maintenance organizations, prepaid health plans, or other specified entities, for the provision of medical benefits to all persons who are eligible to receive medical benefits under publicly supported programs.This bill would delete that list of entities and would instead specify that the director would be required to enter into contracts with managed care plans licensed pursuant to the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, except as otherwise authorized under the Medi-Cal program. The bill would require the director, prior to issuing a new request for proposal or entering into new contracts, to provide an opportunity for interested stakeholders to provide input to inform the development of contract provisions.The bill would also make technical changes to some of the provisions described above.

CA AB 620 - Damon Connolly
Health care coverage for metabolic disorders.
02/12/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 620, Connolly. Health care coverage for metabolic disorders. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of disability insurers, including health insurers, by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan contract and disability insurance policy that provides coverage for hospital, medical, or surgical expenses and is issued, amended, delivered, or renewed on and after July 1, 2000, to provide coverage for the testing and treatment of phenylketonuria, including coverage for the formulas and special food products that are part of a prescribed diet, as specified.This bill would require a health care service plan contract and disability insurance policy that provides coverage for hospital, medical, or surgical expenses and is issued, amended, delivered, or renewed on and after July 1, 2024, to provide coverage for formulas, as defined, for the treatment of other chronic digestive diseases and inherited metabolic disorders, as specified. The bill would specify that these provisions do not apply to Medi-Cal managed care plans to the extent that the services are excluded from coverage under the contract between the Medi-Cal managed care plan and the State Department of Health Care Services. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 657 - Corey A. Jackson
Mental Health Services Funding Act.
04/10/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 657, as amended, Jackson. Mental Health Services Funding Act. Existing state sales and use tax laws impose a tax on retailers measured by the gross receipts from the sale of tangible personal property sold at retail in this state of, or on the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of, tangible personal property purchased from a retailer for storage, use, or other consumption in this state. The Sales and Use Tax Law provides various exemptions from those taxes, including an exemption for the sale of, or the storage, use, or consumption of, food products for human consumption. Existing law defines “food products” to mean, among other things, sugar and sugar products, candy, gum, confectionery, and cocoa and cocoa products.Existing law establishes the Mental Health Services Fund under the administration of the state and continuously appropriates money in the fund for certain purposes, including programs and other related activities as designated by the Children’s Mental Health Services Act, which establishes an interagency system of care for children with serious emotional and behavioral disturbances that provides comprehensive, coordinated care, as specified.This bill would enact the Mental Health Services Funding Act that would require a distributor to pay a tax upon the distributor’s distributions of candy, as defined, at the rate of $0.05 for each untaxed candy distributed. The bill would define “distribution” to mean the sale, except a retail sale, of untaxed candy in this state. The bill would require all revenues, interest, and penalties, less refunds, collected from the candy tax to be deposited into the Candy Tax Fund, a continuously appropriated fund created by the bill, and would require all amounts in the fund to be distributed to the Mental Health Services Fund. By creating a continuously appropriated fund and allocating additional moneys to a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation.This bill would provide for the administration and collection of the tax described above pursuant to procedures set forth in the Fee Collection Procedures Law. By expanding the application of the Fee Collection Procedures Law, the violation of which is a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 665 - Scott D. Wiener
Minors: consent to mental health services.
10/07/2023 - Approved by the Governor.
AB 665, Wendy Carrillo. Minors: consent to mental health services. Existing law, for some purposes, authorizes a minor who is 12 years of age or older to consent to mental health treatment or counseling on an outpatient basis, or to residential shelter services, if the minor is mature enough to participate intelligently in the outpatient services or residential shelter services, as specified, and either the minor would present a danger of serious physical or mental harm to themselves or to others or if the minor is the alleged victim of incest or child abuse. For other purposes, existing law authorizes a minor who is 12 years of age or older to consent to mental health treatment or counseling services if the minor is mature enough to participate intelligently in the outpatient services or counseling services. This bill would align the existing laws by removing the additional requirement that, in order to consent to mental health treatment or counseling on an outpatient basis, or to residential shelter services, the minor must present a danger of serious physical or mental harm to themselves or to others, or be the alleged victim of incest or child abuse.Existing law, for some purposes, requires that the mental health treatment or counseling include involvement of the minor’s parent or guardian unless the professional person treating or counseling the minor determines that the involvement would be inappropriate. For other purposes, existing law requires the involvement of the parent or guardian unless the professional person who is treating or counseling the minor, after consulting with the minor, determines that the involvement would be inappropriate. This bill would also align the existing laws by requiring the professional person treating or counseling the minor to consult with the minor before determining whether involvement of the minor’s parent or guardian would be inappropriate.Existing law defines professional person for these purposes to include, among other things, a mental health professional, a marriage and family therapist, a licensed educational psychologist, a clinical psychologist, the chief administrator of an agency, and a licensed professional clinical counselor, as defined.This bill would add a registered psychologist, a registered psychological assistant, a psychological trainee, an associate clinical social worker, a social work intern, a clinical counselor trainee working under the supervision of a licensed professional, and a board-certified psychiatrist to the definition of professional person for these purposes.This bill would make all of the above changes operative on July 1, 2024.

CA AB 67 - Albert Y. Muratsuchi
Homeless Courts Pilot Program.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 67, as amended, Muratsuchi. Homeless Courts Pilot Program. Existing law governs the jurisdiction of various criminal actions and criminal proceedings. Existing law also provides various diversion programs, including programs for defendants with cognitive disabilities and programs for defendants who were, or currently are, members of the United States military.This bill, upon an appropriation by the Legislature, would create the Homeless Courts Pilot Program, which would remain in effect until January 1, 2029, to be administered by the Judicial Council for the purpose of providing comprehensive community-based services to achieve stabilization for, and address the specific legal needs of, homeless individuals who are involved with the criminal justice system. The bill would require applicant cities or counties seeking grant funds to provide a number of specified services or program components, including, but not limited to, a diversion program enabling participating defendants to have specified charges dismissed upon completion of a program, provision of temporary, time-limited, or permanent housing during the duration of the program, and a dedicated representative to assist defendants with housing needs. The bill would require an applicant for grant funding under the program to submit a plan for a new homeless court program or expansion of an existing homeless court program, and would require any funding awarded to an applicant to be used in accordance with that plan. The bill would also require the Judicial Council, on or before July 1, 2027, to submit a report to the Legislature evaluating the programs funded and the success and challenges of those programs, along with recommendations for improving the programs. The bill would require the Judicial Council, in collaboration with subject matter experts, to establish performance-based outcome measures for each participating homeless court, including, among other things, information relating to the demographics of program participants, housing placements for all participants, and successful substance use disorder treatment rates.

CA AB 68 - Christopher M. Ward
Housing.
01/04/2023 - Read first time.
AB 68, as introduced, Ward. Housing. Existing law, the Planning and Zoning Law, requires each city, county, and city and county to prepare and adopt a general plan that contains certain mandatory elements, including a housing element. Existing law defines several terms for the purposes of these provisions.This bill would make nonsubstantive changes to those definitions.

CA AB 685 - Eduardo Garcia
Workforce training: CaliforniaVolunteers: youth job corps.
05/10/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 685, as introduced, Ramos. Workforce training: CaliforniaVolunteers: youth job corps. Under existing law, by executive order, CaliforniaVolunteers is established in the Office of the Governor and is charged with overseeing programs and initiatives for service and volunteerism. Existing law authorizes CaliforniaVolunteers to form a nonprofit public benefit corporation or other entity exempt from income taxation, as provided, to raise revenues and receive grants or other financial support from private or public sources, for purposes of undertaking or funding any lawful activity authorized to be undertaken by CaliforniaVolunteers. Existing federal law, the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, also requires the state to create a commission to carry out specified duties relating to national service programs to be eligible for grants or allotments under certain programs, or to receive distributions of approved national service positions. Existing state law continues into existence the Board of Commissioners under CaliforniaVolunteers for purposes of meeting the requirements of the federal act and the act’s implementing rules and regulations. #CaliforniansForAll Youth Jobs Corps is a program of the CaliforniaVolunteers.This bill would establish in statute the #CaliforniansForAll Youth Job Corps Program. The bill would require the CaliforniaVolunteers to expand the program, upon appropriation by the Legislature, which would fund supportive services, as specified, that are necessary for homeless youth and current or former foster youth to enable their participation in the workforce development program, as defined. Under the bill, grants would be awarded on a competitive basis. The bill would require the CaliforniaVolunteers to conduct outreach activities and to provide technical assistance to eligible applicants to ensure that grants are awarded to qualified applicants providing a broad spectrum of supportive services. The bill would prescribe definitions, duties for the CaliforniaVolunteers, and requirements for applications and applicants, including the requirement that applicants agree to provide the office any information that the office deems necessary to meet reporting requirements and other grant requirements. The bill would require the CaliforniaVolunteers to evaluate how grants awarded under the program address the needs of eligible targeted populations and, beginning one year after the initial award of grant funds, to post an annual report on its internet website regarding the progress and success of the program.

CA AB 699 - Akilah Weber
Workers’ compensation: presumed injuries.
02/01/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 699, Weber. Workers’ compensation: presumed injuries. Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in the course of employment. Existing law creates a rebuttable presumption that specified injuries, such as meningitis, tuberculosis, or hernia, sustained in the course of employment of a specified member of law enforcement or a specified first responder arose out of and in the course of employment. Existing law creates a rebuttable presumption that skin cancer that develops or manifests in the course of employment of a lifeguard, as specified, arose out of and in the course of employment. Existing law authorizes a lifeguard to file a claim for skin cancer after employment has terminated for a specified period based on years of employment, not to exceed 60 months.This bill would expand presumptions for hernia, pneumonia, heart trouble, cancer, tuberculosis, bloodborne infectious disease, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infection, and meningitis-related illnesses and injuries to a lifeguard employed on a year-round, full-time basis in the Boating Safety Unit by the City of San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. The bill would increase the period of time after termination of employment that a lifeguard employed on a year-round, full-time basis in the Boating Safety Unit by the City of San Diego Fire-Rescue Department can file a claim for skin cancer. The bill would expand the presumptions for illness or injury related to post-traumatic stress disorder or exposure to biochemical substances, as defined, to a lifeguard employed in the Boating Safety Unit by the City of San Diego Fire-Rescue Department.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the City of San Diego.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 3212.11 of the Labor Code proposed by SB 391 to be operative only if this bill and SB 391 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 702 - Corey A. Jackson
Local government financing: juvenile justice.
12/20/2023 - In committee: Set, second hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 702, as amended, Jackson. Local government financing: juvenile justice. Under existing law, there is established in each county treasury a Supplemental Law Enforcement Services Account (SLESA) to receive all amounts allocated to a county for specified purposes. In any fiscal year for which a county receives moneys to be expended for implementation, existing law requires the county auditor to allocate the moneys in the county’s SLESA within 30 days of the deposit of those moneys into the fund. Existing law requires the moneys to be allocated in specified amounts, including, but not limited to, 50% to a county or city and county to implement a comprehensive multiagency juvenile justice plan, as specified. Existing law requires the juvenile justice plan to be developed by the local juvenile justice coordinating council in each county and city and county. Existing law requires the plan to be annually reviewed and updated by the council and submitted to the Board of State and Community Corrections. Existing law requires the multiagency juvenile justice plan to include certain components, including, but not limited to, a local juvenile justice action strategy that provides for a continuum of responses to juvenile crime and delinquency. Existing law also requires each council to annually report to their board of supervisors and the board information on the effectiveness of the programs and strategies funded under these provisions, and requires the board to annually report this information to the Governor and the Legislature and post it on its internet website.This bill would revise and recast required components of the multiagency juvenile justice plan to, among other things, additionally require a plan to include an assessment of existing community-based youth development services, identification and prioritization of areas of the community that are vulnerable to court system involvement due to high rates of poverty and the incarceration of at-promise youth’s family members, among other things, and a description of the target population funded under these provisions. The bill would require programs and strategies funded under these provisions to, among other things, be modeled on healing-centered, restorative, trauma-informed, and positive youth development approaches and in collaboration with community-based organizations. The bill would require no less than 95% of the funds allocated under these provisions to be distributed to community-based organizations and other public agencies or departments that are not law enforcement entities, as specified, and prohibits this portion of the funds from being used for law enforcement activities or personnel. The bill would require a council to include additional information in its annual report to the board of supervisors and the board relating to their programs, including data on youth participants and council members.Existing law requires a juvenile justice coordinating council to consist of certain members, including, but not limited to, the chief probation officer, as chair, and a representative from the district attorney’s office, the public defender’s office, and the sheriff’s department, among others.This bill would revise and recast those membership provisions, and instead require each juvenile justice coordinating council to, at a minimum, consist of 7 members with at least 50% community representatives with the remainder of the seats allocated to representatives from government agencies, as specified. The bill would require a council to select 2 cochairs from amongst its members, at least one of whom shall be a community representative. The bill would require a council to meet no less than 3 times per year and announce its meetings at least 10 days in advance of a meeting.

CA AB 718 - Tri Ta
Veterans: mental health.
09/11/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Rubio.
AB 718, as amended, Ta. Veterans: mental health. Existing law establishes the Department of Veterans Affairs. The department, among other services, provides veterans and their dependents and survivors with assistance in processing service-related disability claims, assistance in obtaining affordable housing, and information about health ailments associated with military service.This bill would require the department to establish a program to fund, upon appropriation by the Legislature, an academic study of mental health among women veterans in California, as specified. The bill would require the department to submit a report summarizing the findings and recommendations of the study to the Legislature no later than July 31, 2025.This bill would make these provisions inoperative on July 31, 2025, and would repeal them as of January 1, 2026.

CA AB 723 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
Pupil placement: special education: foster children: nonpublic, nonsectarian schools or agencies: school of origin.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 80. Noes 0.).
AB 723, as amended, Quirk-Silva. Pupil placement: special education: foster children: nonpublic, nonsectarian schools or agencies: school of origin. Existing law requires a local educational agency serving a foster child to allow the foster child to remain at the child’s school of origin upon the initial detention or placement, any subsequent change in placement, or the termination of the court’s jurisdiction, or pending resolution of a dispute regarding school of origin placement, as provided. Existing law defines “school of origin” as the school that the foster child attended when permanently housed or the school in which the foster child was last enrolled, except as specified. Existing law sets forth a method for providing special education and related services to pupils who are individuals with exceptional needs, as defined. Existing law permits, under certain circumstances, contracts to be entered into for the provision of those services by nonpublic, nonsectarian schools or agencies, as defined. Existing law authorizes a master contract for special education and related services provided by a nonpublic, nonsectarian school or agency only if the school or agency has been certified as meeting specified standards. Existing law sets forth the certification process and procedures for the nonpublic, nonsectarian schools or agencies that seek certification from the Superintendent of Public Instruction.This bill would, for a foster child who is an individual with exceptional needs, define “school of origin” as also including a placement in a certified nonpublic, nonsectarian school, as provided. The bill would require, commencing with the 2024–25 school year, a nonpublic, nonsectarian school or agency seeking certification or already certified to agree in writing, for any foster child it serves, to be designated as the school of origin of the foster child and to allow the foster child to continue their education in the school, as specified.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 48853.5 of the Education Code proposed by AB 373 to be operative only if this bill and AB 373 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 751 - Pilar Schiavo
Elder abuse.
06/29/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 18, Statutes of 2023.
AB 751, Schiavo. Elder abuse. Existing law requires every local law enforcement agency to, when the agency next undertakes the policy revision process, revise or include specified information about the elements of elder abuse crimes in the portion of its policy manual relating to elder and dependent adult abuse, if that policy manual exists. Existing law requires a municipal police department or county sheriffs’ department that adopts or revises a policy regarding elder and dependent adult abuse or senior and disability victimization on or after April 13, 2021, to include specified provisions regarding procedures for investigating elder abuse in that policy. This bill would clarify that a department that complied or complies with the requirements above regarding including specified information about the elements of elder abuse crimes in their policy manuals on or after April 13, 2021, is required to include the specified provisions regarding procedures for investigating elder abuse in their policy.

CA AB 758 - Diane B. Dixon
Firearms.
01/10/2024 - From committee: Without further action pursuant to Joint Rule 62(a).
AB 758, as introduced, Dixon. Firearms. Existing law, commencing on January 1, 2024, prohibits the possession of a firearm that does not have a valid state or federal serial number or mark of identification. Existing law provides certain sentencing enhancements for persons who use or possess a firearm in the commission of certain crimes.This bill would add an additional sentencing enhancement for persons who use or possess a firearm without a valid serial number or mark of identification during the commission of certain criminal offenses.Existing law also prohibits certain persons who have been convicted of a criminal offense or have been treated for a mental disorder from possessing a firearm.This bill would impose a sentencing enhancement for this offense if the firearm possessed does not have a valid serial number or mark of identification.By adding new sentencing enhancements, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 762 - Buffy Wicks
California Violence Intervention and Prevention Grant Program.
09/12/2023 - In Assembly. Ordered to Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 762, as amended, Wicks. California Violence Intervention and Prevention Grant Program. Existing law establishes the Board of State and Community Corrections. Existing law charges the board with providing the statewide leadership, coordination, and technical assistance to promote effective state and local efforts and partnerships in California’s adult and juvenile criminal justice system, including addressing gang problems. Existing law establishes the California Violence Intervention and Prevention (CalVIP) Grant Program and assigns the authority and duties of the board in administering the program, including the selection criteria for grants. Existing law limits the maximum grant amount to $1,500,000. Existing law repeals this program on January 1, 2025.This bill would specify that the purpose of the CalVIP program is to support effective community gun violence reduction initiatives in communities that are disproportionately impacted by community gun violence, as defined. The bill would expand the CalVIP program to include counties that have one or more cities disproportionately impacted by community gun violence and tribal governments. The bill would increase the maximum grant amount to $2,500,000 per year and require a grant cycle to be at least 3 years. The bill would require the board to establish an executive steering committee to be composed of, among other entities, persons who have been impacted by community gun violence and the director of the Office of Gun Violence Prevention or their designee, as specified. The bill would authorize the board to reserve up to 5 percent of the funds appropriated for CalVIP each year for the purpose of supporting programs and activities designed to build and sustain capacity in the field of community gun violence intervention and prevention, as specified. The bill would repeal the repeal date of the CalVIP program, thereby extending this program indefinitely.

CA AB 763 - Laurie Davies
Sexually violent predators: conditional release: placement location.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 763, as introduced, Davies. Sexually violent predators: conditional release: placement location. Existing law provides for the civil commitment of a person who is determined to be a sexually violent predator. Existing law establishes a procedure by which a person committed as a sexually violent predator may petition for conditional release and requires the court, if it makes a specified determination, to place the person on conditional release. Existing law generally requires that a person released on conditional release pursuant to these provisions be placed in the person’s county of domicile prior to their incarceration and prohibits the placement of a person released on conditional release within 1/4 mile of any public or private school, as specified.This bill would prohibit the placement of a person released on conditional release within 1/4 mile of a home school.

CA AB 767 - Michael A. Gipson
Community Paramedicine or Triage to Alternate Destination Act.
09/30/2023 - Approved by the Governor.
AB 767, Gipson. Community Paramedicine or Triage to Alternate Destination Act. Existing law, the Emergency Medical Services System and the Prehospital Emergency Medical Care Personnel Act, governs local emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The Emergency Medical Services System and the Prehospital Emergency Medical Care Personnel Act establish the Emergency Medical Services Authority, which is responsible for the coordination and integration of EMS systems. Existing law makes a violation of the Emergency Medical Services System and the Prehospital Emergency Medical Care Personnel Act or regulations adopted pursuant to the act punishable as a misdemeanor.Existing law, the Community Paramedicine or Triage to Alternate Destination Act of 2020 (the act), authorizes a local EMS agency to develop a community paramedicine or triage to alternate destination program, as defined, to provide specified community paramedicine services. The act requires the authority to develop, and after approval by the Commission on Emergency Medical Services, adopt regulations and establish minimum standards for the development of those programs. This act prohibits a person or organization from providing community paramedicine or triage to alternate destination services or representing, advertising, or otherwise implying that it is authorized to provide those services unless it is expressly authorized by a local EMS agency to provide those services as part of a program approved by the authority. The act also prohibits a community paramedic or a triage paramedic from providing their respective services unless the community paramedic or triage paramedic has been certified and accredited to perform those services and is working as an employee of an authorized provider. The act is repealed on January 1, 2024.This bill would extend the act until January 1, 2031. The bill would expand the allowable community paramedicine services program specialties to include providing short-term, postdischarge followup for persons recently discharged from a hospital due to a serious health condition, including collaboration with, and by providing referral to, home health services when eligible. The bill would require, on or before January 1, 2025, the authority to amend regulations to include sufficient state-level program oversight that would allow for local EMS agencies to develop community paramedicine programs, as specified. Because a violation of the act is punishable as a misdemeanor, and this bill would create new requirements within the act and extend the operation of the act, this bill would expand an existing crime, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program.This bill would extend the authorization for specified community paramedicine short-term, postdischarge followup pilot programs to continue operations from January 1, 2024, until the regulations described above become effective. The bill would repeal certain provisions within the act requiring the authority to seek federal or private funding for those pilot programs. The bill would repeal a provision within the act requiring a local EMS agency to facilitate funding discussions between specified entities to support the implementation of the local EMS agency’s community paramedicine or triage to alternate destination program. The bill would extend a requirement for a county board of supervisors or mayor to establish an emergency medical care committee to advise a local EMS agency that elects to develop a program pursuant to the act from January 1, 2024, to January 1, 2031.Existing law requires the authority to contract with an independent third party to prepare a final report on the results of the community paramedicine or triage to alternate destination programs. Existing law requires the authority to submit the report to the relevant policy committees of the Legislature on or before April 1, 2023. This bill would instead require the authority to prepare the final report and submit the report on or befo

CA AB 775 - Joaquin Arambula
Personal services contracts: state employees: physician registry for state hospitals.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 775, as introduced, Arambula. Personal services contracts: state employees: physician registry for state hospitals. Existing law, the State Civil Service Act, regulates employment with the state and vests in the Department of Human Resources all powers, duties, and authority necessary to operate the state civil service system. Existing law permits the use of personal services contracts for purposes of cost savings when specified conditions are met, including when the potential economic advantage of contracting is not outweighed by the public’s interest in having a particular function performed directly by the state government.Existing law establishes the State Department of State Hospitals within the California Health and Human Services Agency, and provides the department with jurisdiction over specified facilities for the care and treatment of persons with mental health disorders, including the Patton State Hospital.This bill would require the State Department of State Hospitals to establish, by January 1, 2025, a physician registry for the Patton State Hospital to be composed of members of State Bargaining Unit 16, under a 3-year pilot program. The bill would require the department to conduct and post on its internet website a semiannual survey of managers and employees to determine the efficacy of the registry. By January 10, 2026, and each year thereafter for the duration of the pilot program, the bill would require the department to submit a report to the Legislature that includes a study of the effectiveness of the registry to determine if the registry compensation rates were successful in addressing the operational needs for flexible services at a lower cost than contract registries. The bill would make the implementation of its provisions contingent upon an appropriation by the Legislature in the annual Budget Act or other statute, and would repeal its provisions on January 1, 2029.

CA AB 781 - Brian K. Maienschein
Accessibility to emergency information and services: emergency shelters: persons with pets.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 781, as amended, Maienschein. Accessibility to emergency information and services: emergency shelters: persons with pets. Existing law, the California Emergency Services Act, provides that political subdivisions, as defined, have full power during a local emergency to provide mutual aid to any affected area in accordance with local ordinances, resolutions, emergency plans, or agreements. Existing law defines “emergency plan” for these purposes to mean official and approved documents that describe the principles and methods to be applied in carrying out emergency operations or rendering mutual aid during emergencies. Existing law requires that a county send a copy of its emergency plan to the Office of Emergency Services upon an update to the plan.Upon the next update to a city or county’s emergency plan, this bill would require a county to update its emergency plan to designate emergency shelters able to accommodate persons with pets, and would require a city that has previously adopted an emergency plan designating emergency shelters to update its emergency plan to designate emergency shelters able to accommodate persons with pets. This bill would require, upon the next update to a city or county’s emergency plan, whenever a city or county designates any number of emergency shelters that it also designate at least one emergency shelter that can accommodate persons with pets. This bill would also require, upon the next update to a city or county’s emergency plan, whenever a city or county designates any number of cooling centers or warming centers, that it also, to the extent practicable, designate at least one cooling center or warming center, as applicable, that can accommodate persons with pets. The bill would require an emergency shelter designated as able to accommodate persons with pets to be in compliance with safety procedures regarding the sheltering of pets referenced or established in the component of the state and local emergency plan and applicable disaster assistance policies and procedures of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.This bill would also require a city or county to include whether the cooling or warming center can accommodate pets whenever a city or county provides public information regarding the availability of a cooling center or warming center. This bill would require a city or county to make available to the public by posting on its internet website information for pet emergency preparedness, including, but not limited to, among other things, information for creating an evacuation plan and emergency checklist for pets consistent with recommendations publicly published by the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.This bill would also make various findings and declarations in this regard. By requiring cities and counties to update their emergency plans, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 79 - Akilah Faizah Weber
Weapons: robotic devices and unmanned aircrafts.
05/23/2023 - From committee: Without further action pursuant to Joint Rule 62(a).
AB 79, as amended, Weber. Weapons: robotic devices and unmanned aircrafts. Existing law makes it a crime to possess a destructive device. Existing law makes it a felony to possess material with the intent to make a destructive device or explosive without obtaining a permit to do so.This bill would prohibit a person from knowingly manufacturing, modifying, selling, transferring, or operating a robotic device or unmanned aircraft that is equipped or mounted with a weapon, as specified. The bill would make a violation punishable by a fine of at least $1,000 but not more than $5,000. The bill would authorize the Attorney General to bring an action to remedy a violation. The bill would exclude certain entities from these provisions including, among other entities, a defense industrial company that obtains a permit from the Department of Justice, as specified. By creating a new infraction, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 796 - Akilah Faizah Weber
Athletic trainers.
07/06/2023 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to committee. Read second time, amended, and re-referred to Com. on B., P. & E. D.
AB 796, as amended, Weber. Athletic trainers. (1) Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of various professions and vocations by regulatory boards and entities within the Department of Consumer Affairs, including athlete agents. Existing law establishes the Medical Board of California within the Department of Consumer Affairs to enforce the licensing and regulatory provisions relating to physicians and surgeons.This bill would enact the Athletic Training Practice Act, which would establish, until January 1, 2028, the Athletic Trainer Registration Committee within the Medical Board of California to register athletic trainers and administer duties under the act. The bill would prohibit a person from practicing as an athletic trainer or using certain titles or terms without being registered by the committee.This bill would define the practice of athletic training. The bill would impose requirements for registration as an athletic trainer, including official verification of the applicant’s certification by a certifying entity for athletic trainers, as defined, and providing the committee with proof that the applicant passed a background check, as specified. The bill would require a supervising physician or surgeon to define the terms of the relationship with an athletic trainer and continuously maintain supervision and the ability to direct an athletic trainer, as specified.This bill would provide that an athletic trainer registration would be valid for 2 years and subject to renewal. The bill would require the committee to set and collect registration and renewal fees, as specified. The bill would require the committee to perform specified duties regarding administering registrations and performing oversight of registrants, including accepting complaints from the public. The bill would require the committee to deny or revoke the registration of a person that does not provide the committee with specified information and is not certified by a certifying entity for athletic trainers.This bill would establish the Athletic Trainers Fund for the deposit of registration and renewal fees and would make those fees available to the committee upon appropriation by the Legislature for the purpose of implementing the act’s provisions. For the purposes of administering its provisions, the bill would require that the committee only use moneys from the Athletic Trainers Fund, except as provided. The bill would authorize the Director of Consumer Affairs to seek and receive donations from any private individual or entity for the initial costs of implementing the act, and would specify that, if private funds are unavailable, a loan from the General Fund or a special fund may be used and repaid with fee revenue. The bill would require the director to determine that sufficient funds for that purpose have been obtained and to provide notice to the Legislature, the Governor, and on the department’s internet website of the determination.(2) Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.

CA AB 799 - Lori D. Wilson
Homelessness: financing plan.
09/12/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Blakespear.
AB 799, as amended, Luz Rivas. Homelessness: financing plan. Existing law establishes the California Interagency Council on Homelessness to identify mainstream resources, benefits, and services that can be accessed to prevent and end homelessness in California by creating partnerships between federal, state, local, and nonprofit entities. Existing law requires the coordinating council to conduct, or contract with an entity to conduct, a statewide assessment to identify state programs that provide housing or services to persons experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness, as defined, and collect and analyze data to provide a comprehensive view of the homeless response system.This bill would require the council, in collaboration with continuums of care, counties, and big cities, as defined, and other stakeholders, to establish and regularly update a financing plan to solve homelessness by the year 2035. The bill would require the council to establish and update statewide performance metrics to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in homelessness and to increase successful exits from homelessness to permanent housing by updating the Statewide Action Plan for Preventing and Ending Homelessness in California, no later than January 1, 2025, and would require the council to publish these goals on its internet website, as specified.

CA AB 808 - Devon John Mathis
Crimes: rape.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 808, as amended, Mathis. Crimes: rape. Existing law prohibits an act of sexual intercourse accomplished against a person’s will by means of force, violence, duress, menace, or fear of immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the person or another. Existing law provides a greater punishment for this offense if the victim is a minor, as specified.Existing law also prohibits an act of sexual intercourse with a person who is incapable, because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, of giving legal consent, and this is known or reasonably should be known to the person committing the act.This bill would impose a greater punishment for prohibited acts of sexual intercourse, as defined, if the victim is a developmentally disabled minor, as specified and defined, and the person committing the prohibited acts knows or should have known that the person is developmentally disabled. The bill would specifically require a person who commits these offenses upon a person who is 10 years of age or younger to be prosecuted pursuant to another statute providing even greater punishment.By increasing the punishment for crime, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 81 - James C. Ramos
Indian children: child custody proceedings.
09/11/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Limón.
AB 81, as amended, Ramos. Indian children: child custody proceedings. Existing federal law, the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA), governs the proceedings for determining the placement of an Indian child when that child is removed from the custody of the child’s parent or guardian. Existing law states findings and declarations of the Legislature regarding Indian children, including that the state is committed to protecting the essential tribal relations and best interest of an Indian child by promoting practices in accordance with the ICWA, and it is in the interest of an Indian child that the child’s membership or citizenship in the child’s Indian tribe and connection to the tribal community be encouraged and protected, and requires the court to consider those findings in all Indian child custody proceedings.This bill would add to those findings and declarations by stating that the State of California is committed to protecting essential tribal relations by recognizing a tribe’s right to protect the health, safety, and welfare of its citizens. The bill would also declare that provisions of the Family Code, Health and Safety Code, Probate Code, and the Welfare and Institutions Code that apply to proceedings involving an Indian child, as defined, are to be collectively known as the California Indian Child Welfare Act. Existing provisions of state law govern child custody proceedings, adoption proceedings, dependency proceedings, including termination of parental rights, the voluntary relinquishment of a child by a parent, and guardianship proceedings. Existing law provides various definitions for these purposes, including “Indian child,” as provided in the ICWA.This bill would define various terms, including “Indian child,” consistent with provisions of the ICWA. The bill would also make conforming changes and cross-references throughout various provisions.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA AB 815 - James D. Wood
Health care coverage: provider credentials.
06/07/2023 - Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 815, as amended, Wood. Health care coverage: provider credentials. Existing law establishes the California Health and Human Services Agency, which includes departments charged with the administration of health, social, and other human services. Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law sets forth requirements for provider credentialing by a health care service plan or health insurer.This bill would require the California Health and Human Services Agency to create and maintain a provider credentialing board, with specified membership, to certify private and public entities for purposes of credentialing physicians and surgeons in lieu of a health care service plan’s or health insurer’s credentialing process. The bill would require the board to convene by July 1, 2024, develop criteria for the certification of public and private credentialing entities by January 1, 2025, and develop an application process for certification by July 1, 2025.This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer, or its delegated entity, to accept a valid credential from a board-certified entity without imposing additional criteria requirements and to pay a fee to a board-certified entity based on the number of contracted providers credentialed through the board-certified entity.

CA AB 820 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
State boards and commissions: seniors.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 820, as amended, Reyes. State boards and commissions: seniors. Existing law requires the Governor and every other appointing authority to, in making appointments to state boards and commissions, be responsible for nominating a variety of persons of different backgrounds, abilities, interests, and opinions in compliance with the policy that the composition of state boards and commissions shall be broadly reflective of the general public including ethnic minorities and women.This bill would require the composition of various advisory groups and bodies to include a state agency official responsible for administering programs that serve, or state commission official that advocates on behalf of, older adults, as defined, or a representative from an organization that serves or advocates on behalf of older adults.

CA AB 829 - Marie Waldron
Crime: animal abuse.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 829, Waldron. Crime: animal abuse. Existing law makes it a crime to maliciously and intentionally maim, mutilate, torture, wound, or kill a living animal. If a defendant is granted probation for a conviction of this offense, existing law requires the court to order the defendant to complete counseling designed to evaluate and treat behavior or conduct disorders.This bill would delete the requirement that a defendant granted probation complete counseling and would, instead, require the court to order a defendant convicted of specified offenses, including the above-described offense, against animals and granted probation to successfully complete counseling designed to evaluate and treat behavior or conduct disorders. The bill would require the court to consider whether to order the defendant to undergo a mental health evaluation by an evaluator chosen by the court. Upon evaluation, if the evaluating mental health professional deems a higher level of treatment is necessary, the bill would require the defendant to complete such treatment as directed by the court. The bill would generally require the defendant to pay for counseling, the mental health evaluation, and subsequent treatment but would exempt a person who meets specified criteria from paying any costs and would otherwise authorize the court to establish a sliding fee schedule based on the defendant’s ability to pay. The bill would additionally make records related to this evaluation and treatment confidential, as specified.By requiring local government to offer counseling as part of a defendants’ probation for a conviction of specified offenses, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.The California Constitution provides for the Right to Truth-In-Evidence, which requires a 2/3 vote of the Legislature to exclude any relevant evidence from any criminal proceeding, as specified.By excluding relevant evidence from a criminal proceeding, this bill would require a 2/3 vote of the Legislature.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 839 - Dawn Addis
Residential care facilities for the elderly: financing.
09/07/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 839, as amended, Addis. Residential care facilities for the elderly: financing. Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFEs) by the State Department of Social Services.Under existing law, the California Health Facilities Financing Authority Act, the California Health Facilities Financing Authority is authorized to make and fund loans through the issuance of revenue bonds, and award grants, to finance or refinance projects by participating health institutions, as defined. Under the act, projects include construction, expansion, remodeling, renovation, furnishing, or equipping, or funding, financing, or refinancing of a health facility, as defined, or acquisition of a health facility to be financed or refinanced with funds provided in whole or in part pursuant to the act. Under the act, the California Health Facilities Financing Authority Fund is created, with moneys in the fund continuously appropriated to the authority for carrying out the purposes of the act.This bill would expand the above-described program to include RCFEs by adding an RCFE to the definition of “health facility” under the program. The bill would make conforming changes to related provisions. The bill would clarify that other provisions under existing law relating to health facilities would not be affected by the expanded definition, as specified. Under existing law, an RCFE is defined as a housing arrangement chosen voluntarily by persons 60 years of age or over, or their authorized representative, where varying levels and intensities of care, supervision, and certain services are provided, and whereby persons under 60 years of age with compatible needs may be allowed to be admitted or retained in an RCFE, as specified.Under the California Health Facilities Financing Authority Act, one of the types of health facilities is a multilevel facility, which is an institutional arrangement where an RCFE is operated as a part of, or in conjunction with, an intermediate care facility, a skilled nursing facility, or a general acute care hospital. Under that provision, “elderly” means a person 62 years of age or older.This bill would modify that definition of “elderly” to mean a person 60 years of age or older.By expanding the purpose for which the above-described continuously appropriated fund may be used, with regard to RCFE projects, the bill would make an appropriation from that fund. The bill would make legislative findings relating to the purpose of the bill.

CA AB 843 - Juan Carrillo
Electronic benefits transfer system.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 80. Noes 0.).
AB 843, as amended, Juan Carrillo. Electronic benefits transfer system. Existing law provides for the establishment of a statewide electronic benefits transfer (EBT) system, administered by the State Department of Social Services, for the purpose of providing financial and food assistance benefits. Existing law requires the department to establish a protocol for recipients to report electronic theft of cash benefits that, among other things, ensures the prompt replacement of benefits. Existing law provides that a recipient shall not incur any loss of cash benefits that are taken by an unauthorized withdrawal, removal, or use of benefits that does not occur by the use of a physical EBT card issued to the recipient or authorized third party, as specified, and requires the prompt replacement of those cash benefits. Existing regulations also require food benefits that are stolen in this manner to be replaced.This bill would instead prohibit a recipient from incurring any loss of electronic benefits stolen in that manner, thereby codifying the existing regulation described above. The bill would require the protocol described above to be integrated and unified to ensure uniform consistent procedures and outcomes across the state and benefit programs to reduce program complexity and administrative delay for counties and recipients. The bill would prohibit a referral for a suspected fraud investigation from delaying the prompt replacement of benefits.By imposing new duties on counties relating to the administration of benefits, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 845 - David Alvarez
Behavioral health: older adults.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 845, as amended, Alvarez. Behavioral health: older adults. Existing law, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), an initiative measure enacted by the voters as Proposition 63 at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election, establishes the continuously appropriated Mental Health Services Fund to fund various county mental health programs, including the Adult and Older Adult Mental Health System of Care Act. Existing law authorizes the MHSA to be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Legislature if the amendments are consistent with and further the intent of the MHSA.This bill would establish within the State Department of Health Care Services an Older Adult Behavioral Health Services Administrator to oversee behavioral health services for older adults. The bill would require that position to be funded with administrative funds from the Mental Health Services Fund. The bill would prescribe the functions of the administrator and their responsibilities, including, but not limited to, developing outcome and related indicators for older adults for the purpose of assessing the status of behavioral health services for older adults, monitoring the quality of programs for those adults, and guiding decisionmaking on how to improve those services. The bill would require the administrator to receive data from other state agencies and departments to implement these provisions, subject to existing state or federal confidentiality requirements. The bill would require the administrator to report to the entities that administer the MHSA on those outcome and related indicators by July 1, 2024, and would require the report to be posted on the department’s internet website. The bill would also require the administrator to develop a strategy and standardized training for all county behavioral health personnel in order for the counties to assist the administrator in obtaining the data necessary to develop the outcome and related indicators. By expanding the purposes for which funds from a continuously appropriated fund may be spent, this bill would make an appropriation.This bill would declare that it is consistent with and furthers the intent of the MHSA.

CA AB 857 - Liz Ortega
Vocational services: formerly incarcerated persons.
09/08/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 167, Statutes of 2023.
AB 857, Ortega. Vocational services: formerly incarcerated persons. Existing law establishes the Department of Rehabilitation to provide specified services to eligible individuals with physical or mental disabilities. Existing law defines vocational rehabilitation services for these purposes.Existing law establishes the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to operate the state prison and maintain custody and care of persons incarcerated in the state prison as punishment for a crime.Existing law requires each inmate, upon release, to serve a period of parole. Existing law requires each inmate, upon release, to be paid an allowance by the department. Existing law also requires the department to ensure every eligible inmate released from prison receives a valid identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles.This bill would require the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to provide each inmate, upon release, informational materials about vocational rehabilitation services and independent living programs offered by the Department of Rehabilitation, as specified, and an enrollment form for vocational rehabilitation services. The bill would also expand the scope of vocational rehabilitation services offered by the Department of Rehabilitation to include service provided to former inmates with disabilities.

CA AB 864 - Matt Haney
Drug overdose and substance use hotline.
02/15/2023 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 864, as introduced, Haney. Drug overdose and substance use hotline. Existing federal law, the National Suicide Hotline Designation Act, designates the 3-digit telephone number “988” as the universal number within the United States for the purpose of the national suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline system. Existing law, the Miles Hall Lifeline and Suicide Prevention Act, requires the Office of Emergency Services to appoint a 988 system director and, among other things, verify interoperability between and across 911 and 988. Existing law also requires the California Health and Human Services Agency to create, no later than December 31, 2023, a set of recommendations to support a 5-year implementation plan for a comprehensive 988 system.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation to create a 3-digit, statewide telephone number to connect directly to a state-managed crisis center that gives public health information on the prevention of drug overdoses, advice for family members and people experiencing drug addiction, and referrals to substance use disorder treatment.

CA AB 872 - House Education Committee
Elementary and secondary education: omnibus bill.
09/30/2023 - Approved by the Governor.
AB 872, Committee on Education. Elementary and secondary education: omnibus bill. (1) Existing law requires the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to, among other duties, establish standards for the issuance and renewal of credentials, certificates, and permits. Existing law prohibits a person who does not possess a valid credential issued by the State Board of Education, as provided, from being elected or appointed to office as county superintendent of schools. Existing law requires all county superintendents of schools to possess a valid certification document authorizing administrative services.This bill would instead prohibit a person who does not possess a valid credential issued by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing from being elected or appointed to office as county superintendent of schools and would require all county superintendents of schools to instead possess a valid administrative credential issued by the commission, as provided.(2) Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of community care facilities by the State Department of Social Services, including various residential care facilities for children who require out-of-home placement under certain circumstances. Existing law declares the policy of the state to facilitate the proper placement of every child in residential care facilities where the placement is in the best interests of the child. Existing law authorizes children with varying designations and varying needs, including nonminor dependents, as defined, to be placed in the same facility, licensed foster family home, or with a foster family agency, as provided.This bill would explicitly authorize community care facilities, licensed foster family homes, and foster family agencies to include nonminors who are individuals with exceptional needs, as defined, within the group of children with varying designations and varying needs that may be placed in the applicable facility, home, or agency, as provided.Under the Community Care Facilities Act, references to a “child” include nonminor dependents and nonminor former dependents or wards.This bill would, for purposes of the Community Care Facilities Act, explicitly state that references to a “child” include nonminors who are individuals with exceptional needs.

CA AB 876 - Robert A. Rivas
Pajaro River Flood Risk Management Project: environmental laws: exemptions.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 876, Robert Rivas. Pajaro River Flood Risk Management Project: environmental laws: exemptions. Existing law provides for funding for the project for flood control on the Pajaro River in the Counties of Monterey and Santa Cruz, authorized by the federal Flood Control Act of 1966. Existing law also requires a flood management project that receives financial assistance, as provided, to meet specified requirements, and requires the Department of Water Resources or a specified state entity to submit a report to the Legislature that indicates whether the project meets those requirements.This bill would exempt the Pajaro River flood control project from various state and local environmental laws and regulations, only if specified criteria are met and only until a specified date, and as of that date would repeal these provisions. The bill would provide, among other exemptions, that a specified report, as described, shall be conclusively presumed to satisfy the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act for the Pajaro River Project, including to support the issuance of any permit, funding, or other approval by a state or local agency for the Pajaro River Project when implementing the California Environmental Quality Act. The bill would also require the Pajaro Regional Flood Management Agency to consult with the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board regarding the avoidance, minimization, or mitigation of specified environmental impacts, on or before March 1, 2024, as provided.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the Counties of Monterey and Santa Cruz.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA AB 890 - Joe Patterson
Controlled substances: probation.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 890, Joe Patterson. Controlled substances: probation. Existing law prohibits the possession, sale, and transport, as specified, of certain controlled substances. Existing law requires a person granted probation for controlled substance offenses to, as a condition of probation, secure education or treatment from a local community agency designated by the court, if the service is available and the person is likely to benefit from the service.This bill would require the court to order a person granted probation pursuant to those provisions for a violation of specified laws involving any amount of fentanyl, carfentanil, benzimidazole opiate, or any analog thereof, to successfully complete a fentanyl and synthetic opiate education program, if one is available. The bill would prohibit a defendant from being charged a fee for enrollment in that education program.The bill would require a court ordering a defendant to complete those courses to only order the defendant to participate in programs that include, among other things, information regarding the nature and addictive elements of fentanyl and other synthetic opiates and their danger to a person’s life and health. The bill would require program providers to report an unexcused absence by a defendant from a fentanyl and synthetic opiate education program to the court and the probation department within 2 business days. The bill would require the court to only refer defendants to programs that are available at no cost to the participants.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 11373 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by SB 46 to be operative only if this bill and SB 46 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 904 - Sabrina Cervantes
Health care coverage: doulas.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 904, Calderon. Health care coverage: doulas. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act’s requirements a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan or health insurer to develop a maternal mental health program designed to promote quality and cost-effective outcomes. Existing law encourages a plan or insurer to include coverage for doulas.This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer, on or before January 1, 2025, to develop a maternal and infant health equity program that addresses racial health disparities in maternal and infant health outcomes through the use of doulas. Under the bill, a Medi-Cal managed care plan would satisfy that requirement by providing coverage of doula services so long as doula services are a Medi-Cal covered benefit. The bill would require the Department of Managed Health Care, in consultation with the Department of Insurance, to collect data and submit a report describing the doula coverage and the above-described programs to the Legislature by January 1, 2027. Because a willful violation of the provisions relative to health care service plans would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 912 - Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer Sr.
Strategic Anti-Violence Funding Efforts Act.
02/01/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 912, Jones-Sawyer. Strategic Anti-Violence Funding Efforts Act. (1) Existing law establishes the Youth Reinvestment Grant Program within the Board of State and Community Corrections to grant funds, upon appropriation, to local jurisdictions and Indian tribes for the purpose of implementing trauma-informed diversion programs for minors, as specified. This bill would repeal these provisions. The bill would reestablish the Youth Reinvestment Grant Program, to be administered by the Office of Youth and Community Restoration, for the purpose of implementing a mixed-delivery system of trauma-informed health and development diversion programs for youth, as specified. The bill would create the Youth Reinvestment Fund to be used, upon appropriation by the Legislature, by the office for the purposes of the program. The bill would require applicants for the program to be nongovernmental agencies or tribal governments, as specified. The bill would provide that an applicant under this program be awarded no less than $50,000, and no more than $2,000,000, and would specify the requirements of diversion programs to qualify for funding under these provisions.(2) Existing law establishes, until January 1, 2025, the California Violence Intervention and Prevention Grant Program, administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award competitive grants for the purpose of violence intervention and prevention. This bill would establish, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the Department of Justice Violence Reduction Grant Program to be administered by the department for the purpose of supporting evidence-based, focus-deterrence collaborative programs that conduct outreach to targeted gangs and offer supportive services to preemptively reduce and eliminate violence and gang involvement. The bill would require the department to award grants on a competitive basis, with preference given to cities and local jurisdictions that are disproportionately impacted by violence and gang involvement. The bill would require the department to form a grant selection advisory committee, as specified. The bill would require grantees to report to the department, in a form and at intervals prescribed by the department, regarding the progress in achieving the grant objectives, and would require the department to report to the Legislature on the impact of violence prevention initiatives supported by the grant program.(3) Existing law requires the governing board of a school district to give diligent care to the health and physical development of pupils and authorizes the governing board of a school district to employ properly certified persons for the work. Existing law requires a school of a school district or county office of education and a charter school to notify pupils and parents or guardians of pupils no less than twice during the school year on how to initiate access to available pupil mental health services on campus or in the community, or both, as provided.This bill would also establish, upon appropriation by the Legislature, within the California Health and Human Services Agency a program to evaluate applications and award grants, in 5-year cycles, to schools to implement the Trauma Intervention Program to implement evidence-based interventions for pupils impacted by trauma. The bill would give the priority to the Counties of Alameda, Fresno, Merced, Tulare, Kern, and Los Angeles, as specified. The bill would require the agency to open eligibility for grants every 5 years, with priority to the top 6 counties that have the highest rate of violent crime and homicide, as reported by the Department of Justice’s annual crime data report. The bill would also require grants to be awarded to a research organization to conduct a study on the effects of the treatment, including any effect on subsequent criminality.This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the Counties of Alameda, Fresno

CA AB 918 - Eduardo Garcia
Health care district: County of Imperial.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 918, Garcia. Health care district: County of Imperial. Existing law, the Local Health Care District Law, authorizes the organization and incorporation of local health care districts and specifies the powers of those districts, including, among other things, the power to establish, maintain, and operate, or provide assistance in the operation of, one or more health facilities or health services, including, but not limited to, outpatient programs, services, and facilities; retirement programs, services, and facilities; chemical dependency programs, services, and facilities; or other health care programs, services, and facilities and activities at any location within or without the district for the benefit of the district and the people served by the district. This bill would form a local health care district in the County of Imperial, designated as the Imperial Valley Healthcare District, that includes all of the County of Imperial. The bill would require the initial board of directors of the Imperial Valley Healthcare District to be appointed from and by specified bodies, including among others, the Imperial County Board of Supervisors, the Pioneers Memorial Healthcare District Board of Directors, and the Heffernan Memorial Healthcare District Board of Directors. The bill would require the initial board of directors to recommend a permanent funding source mechanism to be presented to and approved by voters via ballot measure. The bill would require the initial board of directors to enter negotiations with El Centro Regional Medical Center to decide the terms of the acquisition of the hospital. The bill would require the initial board of directors to finalize the terms of the acquisition by November 5, 2024. The bill would require the City of El Centro to negotiate in good faith with the Imperial Valley Healthcare District. The bill would require the board of directors to hold a minimum of 3 public meetings between the effective date of the bill and January 1, 2025, as specified. The bill would require the board of directors to recommend to the Imperial County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) dates for the dissolutions of the Pioneers Memorial Healthcare District and Heffernan Memorial Healthcare District and would authorize the board to recommend separate dates for each district’s dissolution. The bill would require, by January 1, 2025, the Imperial County LAFCO to dissolve the Heffernan Memorial Healthcare District and the Pioneers Memorial Healthcare District and would transfer the assets, rights, and responsibilities of the dissolved districts to the Imperial Valley Healthcare District. The bill would require, until the dissolution of both of those districts, the Heffernan Memorial Healthcare District to hold a temporary clerical role for the Board of Directors of the Imperial Valley Healthcare District, as specified. The bill would extend the terms of the board members of the districts being dissolved until their respective dissolution date or January 1, 2025, whichever occurs first. Following the appointment of the board of directors, the bill would require the board of directors to adopt a resolution to divide the Imperial Valley Healthcare District into voting districts for the purpose of electing members of the board of directors from and by the electors of those voting districts beginning with the next district election occurring after January 1, 2024. The bill would require the Imperial Valley Healthcare District to annually report to the Imperial County LAFCO regarding health care service provision in the district in 2024 and 2025, as specified. The bill would require the Imperial County LAFCO to conduct a municipal service review regarding health care service provision in the district by December 31, 2026, and by December 31 every 5 years thereafter. By imposing new duties on the City of El Centro and the County of Imperial, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would state the i

CA AB 920 - Isaac G. Bryan
Discrimination: housing status.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 920, as introduced, Bryan. Discrimination: housing status. Existing law prohibits discrimination in any program or activity that is conducted, operated, or administered by the state, or by any state agency, that is funded directly by the state, or that receives any financial assistance from the state, based upon specified personal characteristics.This bill would also prohibit discrimination based upon housing status, as defined.

CA AB 921 - Mia Bonta
Mental health: workforce.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 921, as amended, Bonta. Mental health: workforce. Existing law regulates the provision of programs and services relating to mental health and requires the creation of community programs to increase access to, and quality of, community-based mental health services. Existing law requires any program permitting mental health professions to respond to emergency mental health crisis calls in collaboration with law enforcement to ensure the program is supervised by a licensed mental health professional, including, among others, a licensed clinical social worker, except as specified.This bill would require the Department of Health Care Access and Information to establish a mentorship program that will connect students enrolled in behavioral health programs with community-based organizations, as specified. The bill would require the department to coordinate a cost-of-living stipend that a student mentee may use for specific expenses. The bill would authorize a community-based organization to apply for the stipend and would require the community-based organization to distribute the stipend to its student mentees distinct from wages earned for work performed. This bill would require the department to offer an increased stipend to encourage bilingual students to participate in the program.This bill would require an eligible student to enter into an agreement with a community-based organization to complete the mentorship program concurrent with their education and to work for the community-based organization after graduation, as specified. The bill would require a community-based organization to, among other things, formally mentor each student mentee and offer each student mentee permanent employment upon successful completion of their educational program.

CA AB 93 - Isaac G. Bryan
Criminal procedure: consensual searches.
06/01/2023 - Read third time. Refused passage.
AB 93, as amended, Bryan. Criminal procedure: consensual searches. Existing law describes search warrants and enumerates the grounds upon which a search warrant may be issued, including, among other grounds, when the property or things to be seized constitute evidence showing that a felony has been committed. Existing law authorizes a peace officer to conduct a search without a warrant if they have the voluntary consent of the person.This bill would prohibit a peace officer or law enforcement agency from conducting a warrantless search of a vehicle, person, or their effects, based solely on a person’s consent, as specified. The bill would specify that consent to conduct a search is not lawful justification for a search.

CA AB 937 - Tina McKinnor
Dependency: family reunification services.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 937, McKinnor. Dependency: family reunification services. Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which may adjudge a child to be a dependent of the court under certain circumstances, including when the child suffered, or there is a substantial risk that the child will suffer, serious physical harm or illness as a result of the failure or inability of their parent or guardian to adequately supervise or protect the child. Existing law establishes the grounds for removal of a dependent child from the custody of the child’s parents or guardian and generally requires the court to order the social worker to provide designated child welfare services, including family reunification services, which are to be provided up to 12 months from the date the child entered foster care.Existing law authorizes the court-ordered services to be extended up to another 6 months at the 12-month permanency hearing if the court finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of the parent or guardian within the extended time period, or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian, and requires the court to specify the factual basis for its conclusion that there is that substantial probability. Existing law similarly authorizes the court-ordered services to be extended up to another 6 months at the 18-month permanency hearing for specified parents if the court finds that it is in the best interest of the child to have the time extended and there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of the parent or guardian within the extended time period, or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian, and requires the court to specify the factual basis for its conclusion that there is that substantial probability.This bill would clarify that the court shall also specify its factual basis for its conclusion that either reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian or, in the case of an Indian child, that active efforts to reunite the child with their family have not been made if the court extends the services on either basis. The bill would also require the court to extend reunification services for an additional 6 months if the court determines at the 18-month permanency hearing that reasonable services have not been provided, except as specified, or that, in the case of an Indian child, active efforts to reunite the child with their family have not been made. By imposing additional duties on counties, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 366.22 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by SB 463 to be operative only if this bill and SB 463 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 940 - Carlos Villapudua
Health care: eating disorders.
02/15/2023 - From printer. May be heard in committee March 17.
AB 940, as introduced, Villapudua. Health care: eating disorders. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law also provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan contract and a health insurance policy to provide coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses, including specified eating disorders.This bill would state that it is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation to expand treatment options and services for individuals suffering from eating disorders.

CA AB 941 - Marie Waldron
Controlled substances: psychedelic-assisted therapy.
01/30/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 941, as amended, Waldron. Controlled substances: psychedelic-assisted therapy. Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, categorizes certain drugs and other substances as controlled substances and prohibits various actions related to those substances, including their manufacture, transportation, sale, possession, and use.This bill would require the California Health and Human Services Agency to convene a workgroup to study and make recommendations on the establishment of a framework governing psychedelic-assisted therapy, as defined. The bill would require that workgroup to send a report to the Legislature containing those recommendations on or before January 1, 2026. The bill would, contingent upon the Legislature enacting a framework governing psychedelic-assisted therapy, authorize the lawful use of hallucinogenic or psychedelic substances for psychedelic-assisted therapy.

CA AB 945 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
Criminal procedure: expungement of records.
10/08/2023 - Vetoed by Governor.
AB 945, Reyes. Criminal procedure: expungement of records. Existing law allows a defendant who successfully participated in the California Conservation Camp program as an incarcerated individual hand crew member, or successfully participated as a member of a county incarcerated individual hand crew, or participated at an institutional firehouse, except as specified, to petition the court to have the pleading dismissed, thus releasing the person of any penalties and disabilities of conviction, except as otherwise provided.This bill would require, beginning May 1, 2026, and every other year thereafter, each superior court to report to the Judicial Council specified data regarding petitions seeking relief pursuant to the above-described provisions. The bill would require the Judicial Council to report the statewide data regarding these petitions beginning June 1, 2026, and every other year thereafter. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2036.

CA AB 946 - Stephanie Nguyen
Emergency services: endangered missing advisory.
07/11/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 946, Stephanie Nguyen. Emergency services: endangered missing advisory. Existing law requires the California Highway Patrol to activate the Emergency Alert System at the request of an authorized person at a law enforcement agency if a child 17 years of age or younger, or an individual with a proven mental or physical disability, has been abducted and is in imminent danger of serious bodily injury or death, and other conditions are met.Existing law authorizes a law enforcement agency to request the Department of the California Highway Patrol to activate a Silver Alert, as defined, if the agency receives a report of a missing person who is 65 years of age or older, developmentally disabled, or cognitively impaired, and certain conditions are met, including that all local resources have been utilized and the disappearance is unexplained or suspicious. Upon concurrence by the Department of the California Highway Patrol that the conditions have been met, existing law requires the department to issue the alert, which may take the form of a be-on-the-lookout alert, an Emergency Digital Information Service message, or an electronic flyer, within the geographical area. This bill would authorize a law enforcement agency to request the Department of the California Highway Patrol to activate an Endangered Missing Advisory, as defined, if the agency receives a report of a missing person and the agency determines that all of specified conditions are met regarding the investigation of the missing person, including, among others, that the person is developmentally disabled, cognitively impaired, has been abducted, or is unable to otherwise care for themselves, placing their physical safety at risk.This bill would authorize the department, if it concurs that these conditions have been met, to activate an Endangered Missing Advisory within the appropriate geographical area. Upon activation of an Endangered Missing Advisory, the bill would authorize the department to assist the investigating law enforcement agency by disseminating an electronic flyer or activating changeable message signs in compliance with certain procedures.

CA AB 954 - Isaac G. Bryan
Dependency: court-ordered services.
09/07/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 954, as amended, Bryan. Dependency: court-ordered services. Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which may adjudge children to be dependents of the court under certain circumstances, including when the child suffered or there is a substantial risk that the child will suffer serious physical harm, or a parent fails to provide the child with adequate food, clothing, shelter, or medical treatment. Existing law authorizes a court to make reasonable orders for the care, supervision, and support of a dependent child, as specified. Existing law establishes the grounds for removal of a dependent child from the custody of the child’s parents or guardian, and requires the court to order the social worker to provide designated child welfare services, including family reunification services, as prescribed. Existing law also requires family maintenance services to be provided or arranged for by county welfare department staff in order to maintain a child in their own home, and requires the services to be available without regard to income to specified families, including families in which the child is in the care of a previously noncustodial parent under the supervision of the juvenile court.This bill would require a court to inquire whether a parent or guardian can afford court-ordered services when making reasonable orders for a dependent child. The bill would prohibit a court from declaring at specified review hearings that a parent or guardian is noncompliant with a court-ordered case plan when the court finds that the parent or guardian is unable to pay for a service or that payment for a service would create an undue financial hardship for them, and the social worker did not provide a comparable free service that was accessible and available to them, as specified.

CA AB 958 - Maria Elena Durazo
Prisons: visitation.
06/07/2023 - Referred to Com. on PUB S.
AB 958, as amended, Santiago. Prisons: visitation. (1) Under existing law, a person sentenced to imprisonment in a state prison or in a county jail for a felony offense, as specified, may, during that period of confinement, be deprived of only those rights as is reasonably related to legitimate penological interests. Existing law enumerates certain civil rights of these prisoners, including the right to purchase, receive, and read newspapers, periodicals, and books accepted for distribution by the United States Post Office.This bill would include the right to personal visits by an intimate partner or a family member, as those terms are defined, as a civil right, as specified. The bill would provide that these civil rights may not be infringed, except as necessary and only if narrowly tailored to further a compelling security interest of the government, and would provide that any governmental action related to these civil rights may be reviewed in court for legal or factual error.(2) Existing law authorizes the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to prescribe and amend rules and regulations for the administration of prisons and requires regulations, which are adopted by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and may impact the visitation of inmates. Existing law requires these regulations to recognize and consider the value of inmate visitation as a means of increasing safety in prisons, maintaining family and community connections, and preparing inmates for successful release and rehabilitation. Existing regulations create the framework for establishing a visitation process in prisons that is conducted in as accommodating a manner as possible, subject to the need to maintain order, the safety of persons, the security of institutions and facilities, and required prison activities and operations.This bill would additionally require those regulations pertaining to inmate visits to recognize and consider the right to personal visits as a civil right. The bill would prohibit the department from denying or restricting in-person contact visits except as specified, including as a disciplinary sanction against the incarcerated person who has committed a listed offense during a personal visit. The bill would require the department to inform both the visitor and the incarcerated person of the specific reason for any denial of a visit, as specified. The bill would require the department to provide at least 3 days of in-person visiting per week, with a minimum of 7 visiting hours per day.

CA AB 962 - Vincent Karchi Fong
Identification cards.
09/07/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 962, as amended, Vince Fong. Identification cards. Existing law imposes a reduced base fee for the issuance of original or replacement identification cards for persons who meet certain income requirements, as specified, and for eligible inmates upon release from a state correctional facility, as specified. Existing law imposes a reduced base fee for the issuance of a replacement identification card for eligible inmates upon release from a federal correctional facility or a county jail facility, and for eligible patients treated in a facility of the State Department of State Hospitals, as specified. Existing law requires the Department of Motor Vehicles to adjust the base fee for the issuance or replacement of an identification card by increasing each fee in an amount equal to the increase in the California Consumer Price Index for the current year, as calculated by the Department of Finance.This bill would require, commencing on January 1, 2027, the fees for the above-mentioned provisions to be reduced by $2.

CA AB 988 - Buffy Wicks
Miles Hall Lifeline and Suicide Prevention Act: veteran and military data reporting.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 988, Mathis. Miles Hall Lifeline and Suicide Prevention Act: veteran and military data reporting. Existing federal law, the National Suicide Hotline Designation Act of 2020, designates the 3-digit telephone number “988” as the universal number within the United States for the purpose of the national suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline system operating through the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline, maintained by the Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use, and the Veterans Crisis Line, which is maintained by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs.Existing law creates a separate surcharge, beginning January 1, 2023, on each access line for each month, or part thereof, for which a service user subscribes with a service supplier. Existing law sets the 988 surcharge for the 2023 and 2024 calendar years at $0.08 per access line per month and beginning January 1, 2025, at an amount based on a specified formula not to exceed $0.30 per access line per month. Existing law authorizes the 911 and 988 surcharges to be combined into a single-line item, as described. Existing law provides for specified costs to be paid by the fees prior to distribution to the Office of Emergency Services.Existing law, the Miles Hall Lifeline and Suicide Prevention Act, creates the 988 State Suicide and Behavioral Health Crisis Services Fund and requires the fees to be deposited along with other specified moneys into the fund. Existing law provides that, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the funds be used for specified purposes and in accordance with specified priorities. Existing law requires the Office of Emergency Services to require an entity seeking moneys available through the fund to annually file an expenditure and outcomes report containing specified information, including, among other things, the number of individuals served and the outcomes for individuals served, if known.This bill would require an entity seeking moneys from the fund to also include the number of individuals who used the service and self-identified as veterans or active military personnel in its annual expenditure and outcomes report.

CA AB 997 - Michael A. Gipson
Exoneration: mental health services.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 997, as amended, Gipson. Exoneration: mental health services. Existing law allows a person who was erroneously convicted of a felony and imprisoned in the state prison or a county jail to present a claim to the Victim’s Compensation Board for the injury sustained by the person through the erroneous conviction and imprisonment or incarceration. Existing law requires the board to provide a recommendation to the Legislature that an appropriation be made for the purpose of indemnifying the claimant for the erroneous conviction injury. Existing law requires that the amount of the appropriation recommended by the board be equivalent to $140 per day of incarceration served, and $70 per day served on parole or supervised release, as specified. Existing law requires that these amounts be updated annually to account for changes in the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price Index, West Region.This bill would, upon appropriation by the Legislature, require the board to reimburse an exonerated person, or provide direct payment to their provider, for mental health services reasonably related to their incarceration. The bill would require the board to reimburse a person, in addition to the amount contained in an approved claim, with specified amounts intended to be used for mental health services, and would prohibit the board from reimbursing a person for a period of time exceeding the amount of time they were incarcerated.

CA SB 10 - Thomas J. Umberg
Pupil health: opioid overdose prevention and treatment: Melanie’s Law.
10/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 856, Statutes of 2023.
SB 10, Cortese. Pupil health: opioid overdose prevention and treatment: Melanie’s Law. (1) Existing law authorizes a public or private elementary or secondary school to determine whether or not to make emergency naloxone hydrochloride or another opioid antagonist and trained personnel available at its school, and to designate one or more volunteers to receive related training to address an opioid overdose, as specified.This bill would state the Legislature’s encouragement of county offices of education to establish a County Working Group on Fentanyl Education in Schools, as provided, for the purposes of outreach, building awareness, and collaborating with local health agencies regarding fentanyl overdoses. The bill would require the State Department of Education to curate and maintain on its internet website, among other things, informational materials containing awareness and safety advice, for school staff, pupils, and parents or guardians of pupils, on how to prevent an opioid overdose.(2) Under existing law, each school district and county office of education is responsible for the overall development of a comprehensive school safety plan for each of its schools operating kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, in cooperation with certain local entities. Existing law requires that the plan identify appropriate strategies and programs that will provide or maintain a high level of school safety and address the school’s procedures for complying with existing laws related to school safety. Existing law requires a petition to establish a charter school to include, among other things, a reasonably comprehensive description of the procedures that the charter school will follow to ensure the health and safety of pupils and staff, including requiring the development and annual update of a school safety plan that includes certain safety topics and procedures.This bill would additionally require a comprehensive school safety plan, and the school safety plan of a charter school, for a school serving pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to include the development of a protocol in the event a pupil is suffering or is reasonably believed to be suffering from an opioid overdose. By creating new duties for local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(3) Existing law states the intent of the Legislature that alternatives to suspension or expulsion be imposed against a pupil who is truant, tardy, or otherwise absent from school activities. Existing law further states legislative intent that the Multi-Tiered System of Supports, which includes restorative justice practices, among other things, may be used to help pupils, as specified.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature that a school use alternatives to a referral of a pupil to a law enforcement agency in response to an incident involving the pupil’s misuse of an opioid, to the extent not in conflict with any other law requiring that referral. The bill would state legislative intent that the above-described Multi-Tiered System of Supports may be used to achieve these alternatives.(4) This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 32282 of the Education Code proposed by SB 323 and SB 671 to be operative only if this bill and either or both of those bills are enacted and this bill is enacted last.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 47605 of the Education Code proposed by AB 1604 and SB 671 to be operative only if this bill and either or both of those bills are enacted and this bill is enacted last.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 47605.6 of the Education Code proposed by AB 1604 and SB 671 to be operative only if this bill and either or both of those bills are enacted and this bill is enacted last.(5) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish proc

CA SB 100 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
05/08/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on BUDGET pursuant to Assembly Rule 97.
SB 100, as amended,  Skinner. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1000 - Susan Rubio
Connected devices: access: abusers.
04/10/2024 - Set for hearing April 23.
SB 1000, as amended, Ashby. Connected devices: access: abusers. Existing law authorizes a court to issue a restraining order to a person to prevent abuse, as specified, based on reasonable proof of a past act or acts of abuse. Existing law authorizes the order to be issued solely on the affidavit or testimony of the person requesting the restraining order.Existing law requires a manufacturer of a connected device to equip the device with a reasonable security feature or features that are appropriate to the nature and function of the device, appropriate to the information it may collect, contain, or transmit, and designed to protect the device and information contained in the device from unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure.This bill would, commencing January 1, 2026, require an account manager, as defined, to deny an abuser, as defined, access to a connected device commencing no later than 2 days after a device protection request is submitted to the account manager by a victim of that abuser, and would set forth the requirements for a victim to submit a device protection request and the requirements that an account manager make the request available. By providing that a victim may include a copy of a signed affidavit to submit a device protection request, and thus expanding the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would require the account manager to notify the victim of specified information and require an account manager and any officer, director, employee, vendor, or agent thereof to treat any information submitted by a victim as confidential and securely dispose of the information, as provided.This bill would authorize enforcement of these provisions by injunction or civil penalty in any court action by any person injured by a violation of those provisions, the Attorney General, or a district attorney, against an account manager or abuser, as provided. The bill would prohibit a waiver of these prohibitions and would declare that these provisions are severable.Existing law authorizes a court to issue an ex parte order for, among other things, disturbing the peace of the other party. Existing law provides that disturbing the peace of the other party may be committed directly or indirectly, including through the use of a third party, and by any method or through any means including, but not limited to, telephone, online accounts, text messages, internet-connected devices, or other electronic technologies.This bill would provide that, for purposes of those provisions, an internet-connected device includes a connected device as described in the bill.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 1002 - Catherine S. Blakespear
Firearms: prohibited persons.
03/19/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (March 19). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1002, as amended, Blakespear. Firearms: prohibited persons. Existing law prohibits a person who has been taken into custody, assessed, and admitted to a designated facility, or who has been certified for intensive treatment after having been admitted to a designated facility, because the person is a danger to themselves or others as a result of a mental health disorder, from owning a firearm for a period of 5 years after the person is released from the facility or for the remainder of their life if the person has previously been taken into custody, assessed, and admitted one or more times within a period of one year preceding the most recent admittance. Existing law requires the facility to submit a report to the Department of Justice containing information that includes, but is not limited to, the identity of the person and the legal grounds upon which the person was admitted to the facility. Existing law allows a person who is prohibited from owning a firearm pursuant to these provisions to request the court for a hearing to reinstate the person’s right to own a firearm, and requires the facility to provide a person subject to the prohibition with the “Patient Notification of Firearm Prohibition and Right to Hearing Form” informing the person of the firearm prohibition and their right to request a hearing.This bill would, among other things, instead require the 5-year prohibition to commence on the date that the facility makes the above-described report to the Department of Justice and would require the Department of Justice to, within 7 days of receipt of the report from the facility, notify a person subject to the above-described provisions of the prohibition and their right to request a hearing to reinstate their right to own a firearm, other deadly weapon, ammunition, or firearm magazine. The bill would require a person subject to the prohibition to relinquish a firearm, other deadly weapon, ammunition, or firearm magazine they own, possess, or control within 72 hours of discharge from a facility, as specified, and would require the “Patient Notification of Firearm Prohibition and Right to Hearing Form” to include information on the relinquishment requirement. The bill would also make technical changes.Existing law also prohibits a person who has been found not guilty by reason of insanity of specified crimes and a person who has been placed under conservatorship by a court because the person is gravely disabled as a result of a mental disorder or impairment by chronic alcoholism from purchasing or receiving, or attempting to purchase or receive, or having possession, custody, or control of a firearm or any other deadly weapon. A violation of this prohibition is a crime.This bill would expand that prohibition to also prohibit the ownership, possession, custody, or control of ammunition or a firearm magazine. The bill would require the court to inform the above-described persons, and their conservator, if applicable, of how the person may relinquish a firearm, other deadly weapon, ammunition, or firearm magazine in the person’s possession, custody, or control according to local procedure and the process for submitting a receipt to the court to show proof of relinquishment. By expanding the application of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law allows a search warrant to be issued upon probable cause, supported by affidavit, naming or describing the person to be searched or searched for, and particularly describing the property, thing, or things and the place to be searched. Existing law also specifies the grounds upon which a search warrant may be issued, including, among other grounds, when the property or things to be seized include a firearm or other deadly weapon that is owned by, in the possession of, or in the custody or control of specified individuals.This bill would additionally authorize a search warrant to be issued on the grounds that the property to be seized i

CA SB 1005 - Angelique V. Ashby
Juveniles.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 22.
SB 1005, as amended, Ashby. Juveniles. Existing law authorizes a probation officer who, after investigation of an application for a petition or any other investigation the probation officer is authorized to make, concludes that a minor is within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, or will probably soon be within that jurisdiction, to, in lieu of filing a petition to declare a minor a dependent child of the court or a ward of the court, or requesting that a petition be filed by the prosecuting attorney to declare a minor a ward of the court, as specified, with consent of the minor and the minor’s parent or guardian, delineate specific programs of supervision for the minor, not to exceed 6 months, and attempt to adjust the situation that brings the minor within the jurisdiction of the court or creates the probability that the minor will soon be within that jurisdiction. In lieu of filing a petition, existing law also authorizes the probation officer, with the consent of the minor and the minor’s parent or guardian, to provide or contract for services including sheltered-care facilities, crisis resolution homes, or counseling and educational centers.For certain offenses, this bill would additionally authorize a probation officer, with the consent of the minor and the minor’s parent, to refer an offense to youth court, as specified.

CA SB 1008 - Steven Craig Bradford
Obesity Treatment Parity Act.
03/14/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
SB 1008, as amended, Bradford. Obesity Treatment Parity Act. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act’s requirements a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of disability and health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law sets forth specified coverage requirements for plan contracts and insurance policies, and limits the copayment, coinsurance, deductible, and other cost sharing that may be imposed for specified health care services.This bill would require an individual or group health care service plan contract or health insurance policy issued, amended, or renewed on or after January 1, 2025, to include comprehensive coverage for the treatment of obesity, including coverage for intensive behavioral therapy, bariatric surgery, and at least one FDA-approved antiobesity medication.Because a willful violation of these provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 101 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Act of 2023.
06/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:20 a.m.
SB 101, Skinner. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1011 - Catherine S. Blakespear
Encampments: penalties.
04/16/2024 - April 16 set for first hearing. Failed passage in committee. (Ayes 1. Noes 3.) Reconsideration granted.
SB 1011, as introduced, Jones. Encampments: penalties. Under existing law, a person who lodges in a public or private place without permission is guilty of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. Existing law also provides that a person who willfully and maliciously obstructs the free movement of any person on any street, sidewalk, or other public place is guilty of a misdemeanor.Under existing law, a nuisance is anything that is injurious to health or indecent or offensive to the senses, or an obstruction to the free use of property, so as to interfere with the comfortable enjoyment of life or property. Existing law also provides that a nuisance is anything that obstructs the free passage or use of any public park, square, street, or highway, among other things. Under existing law, a public nuisance is a nuisance that affects the entire community, neighborhood, or a considerable number of persons. Existing law provides various remedies against a public nuisance, including abatement by any public body or officer authorized by law.This bill would prohibit a person from sitting, lying, sleeping, or storing, using, maintaining, or placing personal property upon a street or sidewalk if a homeless shelter, as defined, is available to the person. The bill would also prohibit sitting, lying, sleeping, or storing, using, maintaining, or placing personal property within 500 feet of a public or private school, open space, or major transit stop, as specified. The bill would specify that a violation of this prohibition is a public nuisance that can be abated and prevented, as specified. The bill would also provide that a violation of the prohibition may be charged as a misdemeanor or an infraction, at the discretion of the prosecutor. The bill would prohibit a person from being found in violation of the bill’s provisions unless provided notice, at least 72 hours before commencement of any enforcement action, as specified. By imposing criminal penalties for a violation of these provisions, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 1012 - Marie Waldron
The Regulated Psychedelic Facilitators Act and the Regulated Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Act.
04/16/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on PUB S. (Ayes 7. Noes 4.) (April 15). Re-referred to Com. on PUB S.
SB 1012, as amended, Wiener. The Regulated Psychedelic Facilitators Act and the Regulated Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Act. (1) Existing law provides for the regulation of various professions and vocations by boards established under the jurisdiction of the Department of Consumer Affairs in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency. Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, classifies controlled substances into 5 schedules, and places the greatest restrictions and penalties on the use of those substances placed in Schedule I. Existing law classifies dimethyltryptamine, mescaline, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), ibogaine, psilocybin, and psilocyn as Schedule I substances, and prohibits various actions related to those substances, including their sale, possession, transportation, manufacture, or cultivation.(2) This bill would enact the Regulated Psychedelic Facilitators Act, which would establish the Board of Regulated Psychedelic Facilitators in the Department of Consumer Affairs to license and regulate psychedelic facilitators, as defined. The bill would require the board to be appointed, as specified, by April 1, 2025. The bill would require the board to establish educational, training, and other qualifications and requirements for obtaining a license as a regulated psychedelic facilitator and would establish conditions of licensure. The bill would require the board to establish fees for the reasonable regulatory costs to the board to administer the act. The bill would require the board to begin accepting license applications by April 1, 2026. The bill would make a license subject to renewal every 2 years. The bill would create the Regulated Psychedelic Facilitators Fund in the State Treasury, would require all funds received pursuant to the act to be credited to the fund, and would make moneys in the fund available to the board for the act’s purposes upon appropriation by the Legislature. The bill would require the board, consistent with recommendations made by the Regulated Psychedelic Substances Advisory Committee, which would be created by the bill, to adopt regulations, on or before January 1, 2026, governing the safe provision of regulated psychedelic facilitation, including regulations governing the scope of practice for regulated psychedelic facilitators and recordkeeping requirements, provided the recordkeeping does not result in the disclosure of personally identifiable information of participants. The bill would require the board to determine which schools and programs meet the requirements of the act and to adopt regulations governing the requirements and process for approving schools and programs related to the provision of psychedelic facilitation training. The bill would authorize the board to charge a reasonable fee for the inspection or approval of schools or programs. The bill would make a violation of the act a misdemeanor and subject a licenseholder’s license to suspension or revocation. The bill would make a violation of specified acts subject to discipline or denial of a license by the board in accordance with specified procedures. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would make specified practices unfair business practices, including a person without a license holding themselves out as a regulated psychedelic facilitator. The bill would authorize a local government to reasonably regulate the time, place, and manner of regulated psychedelic facilitation within its boundaries.(3) This bill would enact the Regulated Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Act to establish a comprehensive system to control and regulate the production, distribution, transportation, storage, processing, manufacturing, testing, quality control, and sale of regulated psychedelic substances for use in conjunction with psychedelic facilitation, as defined, the provision of psychedelic facilitation, the approval of locations where regulated psychede

CA SB 1017 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Available facilities for inpatient and residential mental health or substance use disorder treatment.
04/15/2024 - April 15 hearing: Placed on APPR suspense file.
SB 1017, as introduced, Eggman. Available facilities for inpatient and residential mental health or substance use disorder treatment. Existing law generally requires the State Department of Public Health to license, inspect, and regulate health facilities, defined to include, among other types of health facilities, an acute psychiatric hospital. Existing law generally requires the State Department of Social Services to license, inspect, and regulate various types of care facilities, including, among others, a community crisis home. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license and regulate facilities that provide residential nonmedical services to adults who are recovering from problems related to alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug misuse or abuse, and who need alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug recovery treatment or detoxification services.This bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services, in consultation with the State Department of Public Health and the State Department of Social Services, and by conferring with specified stakeholders, to develop a solution to collect, aggregate, and display information about beds in specified types of facilities, including licensed community care facilities and licensed residential alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities, to identify the availability of inpatient and residential mental health or substance use disorder treatment. The bill would require the solution to be operational by January 1, 2026, or the date the State Department of Health Care Services communicates to the Department of Finance in writing that the solution has been implemented to meet these provisions, whichever date is later.The bill would require the facilities subject to these provisions to submit accurate and timely data to the solution that includes, among other information, the facility’s license type, whether a bed is available, and the target population served at the facility. The bill would require the solution and information contained in the solution to be maintained in compliance with state and federal confidentiality laws. The bill would also prohibit the solution and information contained in the solution from being publically available.The bill would authorize the State Department of Health Care Services to impose a plan of correction against a facility that failed to comply with the requirements of the solution, and if a facility fails to complete a plan of correction, would further authorize the department to impose civil penalties, subject to an appeal and hearing process. The bill would create the Available Care for Inpatient and Residential Mental Health or Substance Use Disorder Treatment Solution Maintenance and Oversight Fund for the receipt of any penalties. Because the bill would continuously appropriate moneys in the fund to the State Department of Health Care Services for the administrative costs of implementing these provisions, it would create an appropriation.The bill would authorize the State Department of Health Care Services and the State Department of Social Services to enter into exclusive or nonexclusive contracts or amend existing contracts for the purposes of administering or implementing the solution. The bill would exempt contracts entered into or amended or changes to existing information technology systems made pursuant to these provisions from the requirements of the California State Contracts Register, specified requirements for personal services contracts, the State Contract Act, the Statewide Information Management Manual, and the State Administrative Manual. The bill would further exempt these contracts and changes from review or approval by the Department of General Services. The bill would authorize the State Department of Health Care Services to implement, interpret, or make specific these provisions by means of information notices, provider bulletins, or other similar instructions notwithstanding speci

CA SB 102 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Act of 2023.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 102, as amended,  Skinner. Budget Act of 2023. The Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2023 by amending, adding, and repealing items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1022 - Nancy Skinner
Enforcement of civil rights.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1022, as amended, Skinner. Enforcement of civil rights. Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), establishes the Civil Rights Department under the direction of an executive officer known as the Director of Civil Rights, to enforce civil rights laws with respect to housing and employment and to protect and safeguard the right of all persons to obtain and hold employment without discrimination based upon specified characteristics or status. The FEHA makes certain discriminatory employment and housing practices unlawful, and authorizes a person claiming to be aggrieved by an alleged unlawful practice to file a verified complaint with the department. The FEHA requires the department to make an investigation in connection with a filed complaint alleging facts sufficient to constitute a violation of the FEHA, and requires the department to endeavor to eliminate the unlawful practice by conference, conciliation, and persuasion.Existing law defines terms for purposes of these provisions, in connection with unlawful practices, as specified. This bill would define the term “group or class complaint” for these provisions to include any complaint alleging a pattern or practice.Existing law prohibits a complaint alleging a violation of specified civil rights provisions from being filed after specified timeframes following the date that the alleged unlawful practice, or refusal to cooperate with remediation of the alleged unlawful practice, occurred. Existing law allows those filing periods to be extended under specified circumstances. Existing law provides that notwithstanding other tolling or limitations period, the time for a complainant to file a civil action alleging a violation of specified civil right provisions shall be tolled during the period beginning with the filing of a complaint with the department until either the department files a civil action or one year after the department issues a written notice to a complainant that it has closed its investigation without electing to file a complaint.This bill would make the filing deadlines for a complaint alleging a violation of those specified civil rights or alleging housing discrimination inapplicable to a complaint filed by the director or their authorized representative, or treated by the director or their authorized representative, as a group or class complaint that is alleged to have occurred within a period of 7 years or fewer before the date the complaint was filed. This bill would provide that notwithstanding any other tolling or limitations period, the time for a complainant to file a civil action under these provisions shall be tolled during the period beginning with the filing of a complaint with the department until either the department files a civil action or one year after the department issues a written notice to a complainant that it has closed its investigation without electing to file a complaint, or if the complainant timely appeals within the department the closure of their complaint, written notice to the complainant that it has remained closed following the appeal.Existing law authorizes the director to bring a civil action in the name of the department, acting in the public interest, on behalf of an aggrieved person if conference, conciliation, mediation, or persuasion fails to eliminate an unlawful practice. Existing law specifies deadlines under which a civil action shall be brought, if it is to be brought, after the filing of the complaint, including deadlines for a complaint that is treated by the director as a group or class complaint for purposes of investigation, conciliation, mediation, or civil action, as specified, and a complaint alleging specified violations. Existing law requires those deadlines to be tolled during a dispute resolution proceeding.This bill would require those deadlines for filing a civil action to be tolled during a dispute resolution proceeding, for the amount of time specified in any written agre

CA SB 1024 - Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh
Healing arts: Board of Behavioral Sciences: licensees and registrants.
04/11/2024 - In Assembly. Read first time. Held at Desk.
SB 1024, as amended, Ochoa Bogh. Healing arts: Board of Behavioral Sciences: licensees and registrants. (1) Existing law establishes the Board of Behavioral Sciences within the Department of Consumer Affairs and requires the board to regulate various registrants and licensees under the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Act (LMFTA), the Educational Psychologist Practice Act (EPPA), the Clinical Social Worker Practice Act (CSWPA), and the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act (LPCCA). Existing law makes a violation of the provisions under those acts a crime.Existing law, under those acts, requires a licensee to display their license in a conspicuous place in the licensee’s primary place of practice. Existing law requires a licensee or registrant to provide, before initiating specified services or as soon as practicably possible thereafter, a client with a prescribed written notice that specifies that the board receives and responds to complaints regarding services within the scope of the licensed practiced, among other things.This bill would provide that a licensee is required to display their license in a conspicuous place in the licensee’s primary place of practice when seeing clients in person. The bill, commencing July 1, 2025, would require the above-described written notice to additionally include information about the licensee or registrant, including, among others, the licensee’s or registrant’s full name as filed with the board and the license or registration number, as prescribed.(2) Existing law, under the LMFTA, CSWPA, and LPCCA, requires an applicant for licensure to have, among other things, at least one hour of direct supervisor contact, as defined, in each week for which experience is credited in each work setting. For purposes of that definition, existing law refers to the individual receiving supervision as the supervisee. Existing law prohibits supervisors of supervisees, as specified, from serving as individual or triadic supervisors for more than 6 supervisees at any time, as provided.This bill would revise the definition of “one hour of direct supervisor contact,” delete references to “supervisee,” and instead refer to that individual as the person receiving supervision for providing clinical mental health services. The bill would delete the above-described prohibition and instead prohibit supervisors in nonexempt settings from serving as individual or triadic supervisors for more than a total of 6 persons who are receiving supervision for providing clinical mental health services in a nonexempt setting.(3) Existing law, under the CSWPA, requires a licensee to complete specified actions on or before the expiration date of the license to renew an unexpired license. Existing law requires the current renewal receipt to be displayed near the licensee’s license.This bill would repeal the above-described requirement that the current renewal receipt be displayed near the licensee’s license.(4) Because the bill would impose new requirements on licensees and registrants under the LMFTA, EPPA, CSWPA, and LPCCA, the violation of which is a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 1025 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Pretrial diversion for veterans.
04/15/2024 - April 15 hearing: Placed on APPR suspense file.
SB 1025, as amended, Eggman. Pretrial diversion for veterans. Existing law provides for the diversion of specified criminal offenders in alternate sentencing and treatment programs. Existing law provides for a pretrial diversion program for a defendant who was, or currently is, a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, who may be suffering from sexual trauma, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, or mental health problems as a result of the defendant’s military service. Existing law authorizes the court, with the consent of the defendant and a waiver of the defendant’s speedy trial right, to postpone prosecution, either temporarily or permanently, of a criminal offense and place the defendant in a pretrial diversion program.This bill would add felony offenses, as specified, to the pretrial diversion program for a defendant who was, or currently is, a member of the Armed Forces of the United States and when the defendant’s condition was a significant factor in the commission of the charged offense. The bill would require the court to find that the defendant’s condition was a significant factor in the commission of the offense unless there is clear and convincing evidence otherwise and would authorize the court to consider any relevant and credible evidence in making this determination. By requiring counties to coordinate services for a new group of veterans, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 103 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 103, as amended,  Skinner. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years. This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes. The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1038 - Catherine S. Blakespear
Firearms.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1038, as amended, Blakespear. Firearms. (1) Existing law, as enacted by the Safety for All Act of 2016, an initiative statute approved by voters as Proposition 63 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, requires a person to report the loss or theft of a firearm that the person owns or possesses to a local law enforcement agency in the jurisdiction in which the theft or loss occurred within 5 days of the time that the owner or possessor knew or should have known that the firearm had been stolen or lost, as specified.Proposition 63 allows its provisions to be amended by a vote of 55% of the Legislature so long as the amendments are consistent with, and further the intent of, the act.This bill would amend Proposition 63 by requiring a person to report the loss or theft within 48 hours of the time that the owner or possessor knew or should have known that the firearm had been stolen or lost.(2) Existing law directs law enforcement agencies to submit the description of a firearm that has been reported stolen, lost, found, recovered, or under observation directly to an automated Department of Justice system. Existing law requires these law enforcement agencies to report to the Department of Justice any information in their possession necessary to identify and trace the history of a recovered firearm that is illegally possessed, has been used in a crime, or is suspected of having been used in a crime. Existing law requires the department to analyze this data and to submit an annual report to the Legislature summarizing this analysis, as specified.This bill would require the department to inspect the 25 firearm dealer locations in the annual report that are the source or origin of the highest gross number of firearms that were illegally possessed, used in a crime, or suspected to have been used in a crime, as specified.(3) Existing law generally regulates the sale and transfer of firearms, including, among other requirements, that every dealer keep a record of electronic or telephonic transfers of firearms.This bill would require a firearm dealer to annually certify their inventory to the Department of Justice, as specified. Upon request by a local law enforcement agency, the bill would require the Department of Justice to send a copy of the annual certifications to the agency. The bill would authorize the Attorney General, a city attorney, or county counsel to impose a civil penalty on a person who violates this provision in the amount of $3,000 per day for the first violation, $5,000 per day for a 2nd violation, and $10,000 per day for a 3rd and subsequent violation, as specified.(4) Existing law requires, with certain exceptions, a firearm dealer to report an acquisition of a firearm to the Department of Justice, as specified.This bill would, commencing January 1, 2027, remove specified exceptions to those provisions.

CA SB 104 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 189, Statutes of 2023.
SB 104, Skinner. Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023. The Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 and 2023–24 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1057 - Caroline Menjivar
Juvenile justice coordinating council.
03/19/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on RLS.
SB 1057, as amended, Menjivar. Juvenile justice coordinating council. Under existing law, there is established in each county treasury a Supplemental Law Enforcement Services Account (SLESA) to receive all amounts allocated to a county for specified purposes. Existing law requires the moneys to be allocated in specified amounts, including, but not limited to, 50% to a county or city and county to implement a comprehensive multiagency juvenile justice plan, as specified. Existing law requires the juvenile justice plan to be developed by the local juvenile justice coordinating council in each county and city and county. Existing law requires the plan to be annually reviewed and updated by the council and submitted to the Board of State and Community Corrections. Existing law requires a county or city and county to submit a report to the board of supervisors and the board to assess the effectiveness of the programs, strategies, and system enhancements funded under these provisions and specifies the information to be included in the report.This bill would require a county or city and county to establish a juvenile justice coordinating council in order to obtain funding under these provisions. The bill would require the board to evaluate if a county or a city and county has complied with the requirements of these provisions and would authorize the board or any state agency overseeing the administration of these funds to determine an appropriate remedial action or to withhold funding if a county or city and county fails to create a juvenile justice coordinating council. The bill would revise required components of the multiagency juvenile justice plan to, among other things, additionally require a plan to include an assessment of existing community-based youth development services, identification and prioritization of areas of the community that are vulnerable to court system involvement due to high rates of poverty and the incarceration of at-promise youth’s family members, among other things, and a description of the target population funded under these provisions. The bill would require assessments to prioritize soliciting direct feedback on youth participants’ satisfaction with existing services and resources. The bill would require programs and strategies funded under these provisions to, among other things, be modeled on healing-centered, restorative, trauma-informed, and positive youth development approaches and in collaboration with community-based organizations. The bill would prohibit the sharing of personally identifying information across agencies without informed, voluntary, revocable, and written consent of youth participants or their parents or legal guardians. The bill would require a council to include additional information in its annual report to the board of supervisors and the board relating to their programs, including data on youth participants and council members.The bill would require the local agency overseeing requests for proposals for funds under these provisions to engage with community stakeholders, as specified, and take into account the county’s juvenile justice plan and equity funding across the county. The bill would authorize any local agency to oversee the request for proposals except for a law enforcement-related agency, with preference for behavioral health-related local agencies.Existing law requires a juvenile justice coordinating council to consist of certain members, including, but not limited to, the chief probation officer, as chair, and a representative from the district attorney’s office, the public defender’s office, and the sheriff’s department, among others.This bill would revise and recast those membership provisions, and instead require each county juvenile justice coordinating council to, at a minimum, consist of at least 50% community representatives with the remainder of the seats allocated to representatives from governmental agencies, as specified. The bill would require the c

CA SB 106 - Scott D. Wiener
Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023.
04/08/2024 - Ordered to second reading.
SB 106, as amended,  Wiener. Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023. The Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 and 2023–24 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 by amending, adding, and repealing items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1063 - Shannon L. Grove
Pupil safety: identification cards.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Ordered to third reading.
SB 1063, as amended, Grove. Pupil safety: identification cards. Existing law requires a public school or private school that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, and that issues pupil identification cards to have printed on the pupil identification cards the telephone numbers for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the National Domestic Violence Hotline, and authorizes those schools to have printed on the identification cards certain other suicide-prevention and emergency-response numbers, as provided.This bill, commencing July 1, 2025, would require a public school or private school that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, and that issues pupil identification cards to have printed on the identification cards the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) for the mental health resources internet website of the county in which the public or private school is located. The bill would require schools subject to this requirement that, as of January 1, 2025, have a supply of unissued identification cards that are noncompliant with this requirement to issue the noncompliant identification cards until that supply is depleted. The bill would authorize those schools subject to these requirements to replace any or all of the required information mentioned above with a quick response (QR) code that links to the information being replaced.

CA SB 1074 - Brian W. Jones
Sexually violent predators.
04/09/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1074, as introduced, Jones. Sexually violent predators. Existing law provides for the civil commitment of a person who is determined to be a sexually violent predator. Existing law establishes a procedure by which a person committed as a sexually violent predator may petition for conditional release and requires the court, if it makes a specified determination, to place the person on conditional release. Existing law generally requires that a person released on conditional release pursuant to these provisions be placed in the person’s county of domicile prior to their incarceration unless extraordinary circumstances exist requiring placement outside the county, as specified. Existing law also prohibits the placement of a person released on conditional release within 1/4 mile of any public or private school, as specified.Existing law defines a sexually violent predator as a person who has been convicted of a sexually violent offense and has a diagnosed mental disorder that makes the person a danger to others in that they are likely to engage in sexually violent criminal behavior. Existing law requires the State Department of State Hospitals to notify the sheriff or chief of police, or both, the district attorney, or the county’s designated counsel under specific circumstances, including when it makes a recommendation to the court for community outpatient treatment for a person committed as a sexually violent predator.This bill, the Sexually Violent Predator Accountability, Fairness, and Enforcement Act, would require the Director of State Hospitals to ensure department vendors consider public safety as the overriding consideration in the placement of a sexually violent predator and approve a potential placement before a department employee or vendor signs a lease or rental agreement for the placement of a sexually violent predator.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA SB 1082 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Augmented residential care facilities.
04/16/2024 - From committee: Do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (April 15).
SB 1082, as amended, Eggman. Augmented residential care facilities. Existing law, the Bronzan-McCorquodale Act, contains provisions governing the operation and financing of community mental health services in every county through locally administered and locally controlled community mental health programs.Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of various community care facilities, including, but not limited to, adult residential facilities and enhanced behavioral supports homes, as defined, by the State Department of Social Services. Under existing law, the department similarly regulates residential care facilities for the elderly. A violation of provisions relating to these facilities is a misdemeanor.This bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services (DHCS), jointly with the County Behavioral Health Directors Association of California, to implement a certification program to provide augmented services to adults with serious mental illness in homelike community settings, and would require those settings to be licensed by the State Department of Social Services (DSS) as a type of enhanced behavioral supports home known as an augmented residential care facility (ARCF). The bill would require an ACRF to have a maximum capacity of 6 residents, and to conform with the requirements of a specified federal regulation relating to community-based settings and specified provisions of the California Community Care Facilities Act. The bill would require the DHCS to issue a certification of program approval to an ARCF before DSS issues a license. The bill would require the DHCS to establish by regulation a rate methodology for ARCFs that includes a fixed-facility component for residential services and an individualized services and support component based on each consumer’s needs, as specified. The bill would prohibit a local mental or behavioral health agency from paying a rate to an ARCF for a consumer that exceeds the rate in the DHCS-approved ARCF placement plan for the facility unless certain conditions are met. The bill would authorize a local mental or behavioral health agency to recommend an applicant for certification to the DHCS as part of an approved community placement plan if the applicant meets specified requirements. The bill would authorize DHCS to decertify an ARCF that does not comply with program requirements, and to make recommendations to DSS regarding the facility’s license. The bill also would authorize DHCS to initiate proceedings for temporary suspension of the license, as specified. The bill would be implemented only to the extent that funds for its purposes are made available through an appropriation in the annual Budget Act.By creating requirements for augmented residential care facilities, a violation of which would be a crime, and by imposing new duties on local behavioral health agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 11 - Pilar Schiavo
California State University: mental health counseling.
08/23/2023 - August 23 set for first hearing canceled at the request of author.
SB 11, as amended, Menjivar. California State University: mental health counseling. Existing law establishes the California State University, under the administration of the Trustees of the California State University, as one of the segments of public postsecondary education in the state. The California State University comprises 23 institutions of higher education located throughout the state.This bill would require the trustees to comply with various requirements on mental health counseling at CSU, including having one full-time equivalent California-licensed mental health counselor per 1,500 students enrolled at each CSU campus. The bill, contingent upon appropriation by the Legislature, would establish the CSU Mental Health Professionals Act to provide one-time grants to certain CSU students to become mental health counselors in the state. The bill, contingent upon appropriation by the Legislature, would establish the Mental Health Professionals Fund as the depository of moneys appropriated or otherwise received for the program, and upon appropriation by the Legislature, would require the Department of Health Care Access and Information to disburse moneys in the fund under the act. The bill would define “mental health counselor” for purposes of these provisions.

CA SB 1122 - Kelly Seyarto
Peace officers: educational requirements.
04/08/2024 - In Assembly. Read first time. Held at Desk.
SB 1122, as amended, Seyarto. Peace officers: educational requirements. Existing law requires peace officers in this state to meet specified minimum standards, including age and education requirements. Existing law requires the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to develop a modern policing degree program, with the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training and other stakeholders to serve as advisors, as specified, and to submit a report on recommendations to the Legislature outlining a plan to implement the program on or before June 1, 2023. Existing law requires the report to include, among other things, recommendations to include both the modern policing degree program and a bachelor’s degree in the discipline of their choosing as minimum education requirements for employment as a peace officer. Existing law requires the commission to adopt the recommended criteria within 2 years of when the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges submits its report to the Legislature.This bill would specify that a bachelor’s degree or an associate’s degree required for employment as a peace officer under these provisions may be obtained after completion of the Peace Officer Standards and Training program and within 36 months of employment as a peace officer.

CA SB 1137 - Lola Smallwood-Cuevas
Discrimination claims: intersectionality of characteristics.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 9. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1137, as amended, Smallwood-Cuevas. Discrimination claims: intersectionality of characteristics. (1) Existing law, the Unruh Civil Rights Act, provides that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state are entitled to full and equal accommodations in all business establishments regardless of their sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sexual orientation, citizenship, primary language, or immigration status. Existing law defines “sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sexual orientation, citizenship, primary language, or immigration status” for these purposes as including a perception that the person has any particular characteristic or characteristics within the listed categories or that the person is associated with a person who has, or is perceived to have, any particular characteristic or characteristics within the listed categories.This bill would revise that definition to include any intersection or combination of those characteristics, as specified.(2) Existing law declares that it is the policy of the state to afford all persons in public schools, regardless of specified characteristics, equal rights and opportunities in the educational institutions of the state, and states that the purpose of related existing law is to prohibit acts that are contrary to that policy and to provide remedies. This bill would revise that policy statement to include remedies that will eliminate those discriminatory acts, including discrimination not just because of one protected trait, but also because of the intersection of 2 or more protected bases.For purposes of certain related educational equity provisions, existing law defines “disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic that is contained in the definition of hate crimes” to include a perception that the person has any of those characteristics or that the person is associated with a person who has, or is perceived to have, any of those characteristics.This bill would revise that definition to include any intersection or combination of those characteristics, as specified.(3) Existing law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), establishes the Civil Rights Department to enforce civil rights laws with respect to housing and employment, as prescribed. The FEHA recognizes and declares to be a civil right the opportunity to seek, obtain, and hold employment and housing without discrimination because of a specified characteristic. The FEHA makes certain discriminatory practices based on those characteristics unlawful. The FEHA also declares that its purpose is to provide effective remedies that will eliminate these discriminatory practices.This bill would revise the above-described declaration on providing effective remedies to specify that it includes discrimination not just because of one protected trait, but also because of the intersection of 2 or more protected bases.The FEHA defines terms used in connection with unlawful practices. These include “race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sex, age, sexual orientation, reproductive health decisionmaking, or veteran or military status,” which includes a perception that the person has any of those characteristics or is associated with a person who has, or is perceived to have, any of those characteristics. This bill would revise that definition to include any intersection or combination of those characteristics, as specified. This bill would also state that the above provisions are declaratory of existing law.

CA SB 114 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:45 p.m.
SB 114, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes a public school financing system that requires state funding for school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to be calculated pursuant to a local control funding formula, as specified. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to annually calculate a county local control funding formula for each county superintendent of schools that includes, among other things, an alternative education grant, as specified. Existing law includes, among other things, a base grant based upon average daily attendance as a component of that alternative education grant.This bill would revise the alternative education grant by, among other things, increasing the base grant component of the alternative education grant, revising the calculation of average daily attendance for purposes of the alternative education grant, as specified, and establishing add-ons of $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a juvenile court school and $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a county community school. The bill would require the Superintendent to allocate $3,000 per unit of average daily attendance for a Student Support and Enrichment Block Grant, as provided. The bill would make these provisions applicable commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year.(2) Existing law, commencing with the 2018–19 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $200,000 and other specified amounts, that are dependent upon the number and size of school districts under its jurisdiction and that are determined to be in need of differentiated assistance, to a county superintendent of school’s local control funding formula allocation, as specified.This bill, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, would increase the above-described add-on by $100,000.(3) Existing law, commencing with the 2015–16 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $2,000,000 to the Los Angeles County Office of Education’s local control funding formula allocation for the purpose of supporting statewide professional development and leadership training for education professionals related to antibias education and the creation of inclusive and equitable schools.This bill would, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, increase that add-on for the Los Angeles County Office of Education by $1,000,000 to instead be $3,000,000.(4) The Early Education Act requires the Superintendent to administer the California state preschool program. The act also requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the Director of Social Services and the executive director of the State Board of Education, to convene a statewide interest holder workgroup to provide recommendations on best practices for increasing access to high-quality universal preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-old children offered through a mixed-delivery model that provides equitable learning experiences across a variety of settings. The act requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the director, to provide a report to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature and the Department of Finance with the recommendations of the workgroup no later than January 15, 2023.This bill would delay the reporting of those recommendations described above to instead be no later than March 31, 2024.(5) Existing law establishes the California Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant Program as a state early learning initiative with the goal of expanding access to classroom-based prekindergarten programs. Existing law appropriates $300,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education in both the 2021–22 fiscal year and the 2022–23 fiscal year for allocation to local educational agencies as base grants, enrollment grants, and supplemental grants, as specified.The bill would authorize the department to allo

CA SB 117 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Higher education trailer bill.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:45 p.m.
SB 117, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Higher education trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program to provide one-time grants for the construction of student housing or for the acquisition and renovation of commercial properties into student housing for the purpose of providing affordable, low-cost housing options for students enrolled in public postsecondary education in the state. Existing law appropriates $1,434,133,000 for the 2022–23 fiscal year from the General Fund for the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program for purposes of the one-time grants described above.This bill, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, would require specified funding previously allocated, or planned to be allocated, to the University of California, the California State University, and the California Community Colleges for those construction grants to instead be funded by revenue bonds issued by the University of California and the California State University, and local revenue bonds issued by community college districts. The bill would require any General Fund support for those grants provided to the campuses of the University of California, the California State University, and the California Community Colleges to revert to the General Fund. The bill would eliminate the 2022–23 fiscal year General Fund appropriation for the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program.(2) Existing law appropriates $650,000,000 from the General Fund to the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges for transfer to the Learning Recovery Emergency Fund. Existing law requires the chancellor’s office to allocate those funds to community college districts on the basis of actual reported full-time equivalent students, as provided. Existing law authorizes the funds to be expended for certain purposes related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including student supports, reengagement strategies, faculty grants, and professional development opportunities.This bill would authorize the funds in the Learning Recovery Emergency Fund to be used for additional purposes, including scheduled maintenance and special repairs of facilities and efforts to increase student retention rates and enrollment by engaging former community college students who may have withdrawn due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.(3) Existing law, until June 30, 2023, authorizes the University of California to provide a scholarship as established by the university or a campus of the university, derived from nonstate funds received for that purpose, to any of its enrolled students who meet the eligibility requirements for that scholarship.This bill would extend that authorization by 4 years.(4) Existing federal law provides for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known in California as CalFresh, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each county.Existing law requires each campus of the California Community Colleges, no later than July 1, 2022, to establish the position of Basic Needs Coordinator to assist students with on- and off-campus housing, food, mental health, and other basic needs services and resources, among other responsibilities, and to establish a Basic Needs Center where basic needs services, resources, and staff are made available to students, as specified. Existing law requires each community college campus to report certain information to the office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges related to basic needs services and resources. Existing law requires the chancellor’s office to annually develop and submit a report to the Governor and the Legislature based on the data and information received from campuses and information on the use of funds made available to implement these provisions.This bill would require each community college camp

CA SB 1170 - Caroline Menjivar
Political Reform Act of 1974: campaign funds.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 30.
SB 1170, as introduced, Menjivar. Political Reform Act of 1974: campaign funds. Under existing law, campaign funds may not be used for to pay health-related expenses for a candidate, elected officer, or any individual or individuals with authority to approve the expenditure of campaign funds held by a committee, or members of their households.This bill would apply that rule to physical health-related expenses only. This bill would also expressly permit campaign funds to be used to pay or reimburse a non-incumbent candidate for reasonable and necessary mental healthcare expenses if the candidate does not have health insurance or has been denied coverage for mental healthcare expenses by their health insurance, as specified.The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 2/3 vote of each house of the Legislature and compliance with specified procedural requirements.This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act.

CA SB 118 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Budget Act of 2023: health.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 118, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Budget Act of 2023: health. (1) Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law requires a health care service plan to provide disclosures regarding the benefits, services, and terms of the plan contract, as specified, to provide the public, subscribers, and enrollees with a full and fair disclosure of the provisions of the plan.This bill would require the department to develop standard templates for the disclosure form and evidence of coverage, to include, among other things, standard definitions, benefit descriptions, and any other information that the director determines, consistent with the goals of providing fair disclosures of the provisions of a health care service plan. The bill would require the department to consult with the Department of Insurance and interested stakeholders in developing the standard templates. The bill would require health care service plans, beginning January 1, 2025, to use the standard templates for any disclosure form or evidence of coverage published or distributed, except as specified. Because a willful violation of these requirements is a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would authorize the department to develop standard templates for a schedule of benefits, an explanation of benefits, a cost-sharing summary, or any similar document. The bill would authorize the department to require health care service plans to use the standard templates, except as specified, and would authorize the director to require health care service plans to submit forms the health care service plan created based on the department’s templates for the purpose of compliance review. The bill would additionally specify that the department may implement these provisions by issuing and modifying templates and all-plan letters or similar instructions, without taking regulatory action. The bill would also update cross-references in various provisions.(2) Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy to cover mental health and substance use disorder treatment, including medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by an in-network or out-of-network 988 center or mobile crisis team. Existing law prohibits a health care service plan or insurer from requiring prior authorization for medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by a 988 center or mobile crisis team.This bill would instead specify that mental health and substance use disorder treatment includes behavioral health crisis services that are provided by a 988 center, mobile crisis team or other provider of behavioral health crisis services. The bill would prohibit a health care service plan or health insurer from requiring prior authorization for behavioral health crisis stabilization services and care, but would authorize prior authorization for medically necessary mental health or substance use disorder services following stabilization from a behavioral health crisis addressed by services provided through the 988 system.This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer that is contacted by a 988 center, mobile crisis team, or other provider of behavioral health crisis services to, within 30 minutes of initial contact, either authorize poststabilization care or inform the provider that it will arrange for the prompt transfer of the enrollee’s care to another provider. The bill would require the plan or insurer to reimburse a provider for poststabilization care in specified circumstances, including if the plan or insurer did not respond within 30 minutes to authorize care or arrange for transfer. The bill would require a plan or insurer to promine

CA SB 1184 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Mental health: involuntary treatment: antipsychotic medication.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 30.
SB 1184, as amended, Eggman. Mental health: involuntary treatment: antipsychotic medication. Existing law, the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act, provides for the involuntary commitment of persons who are a danger to themselves or others, or who are gravely disabled, due to a mental disorder or chronic alcoholism or drug abuse for 72 hours for evaluation and treatment, as specified. If certain conditions are met after the 72-hour detention, the act authorizes the certification of the person for a 14-day maximum period of intensive treatment and then another 14-day or 30-day maximum period of intensive treatment after the initial 14-day period of intensive treatment. Existing law, during the 30-day period of intensive treatment, as specified, also authorizes up to an additional 30 days of intensive treatment if certain conditions are met. Existing law authorizes the administration of antipsychotic medication to a person who is detained for evaluation and treatment for any of those detention periods, and establishes a process for hearings to determine the person’s capacity to refuse the treatment. Existing law requires a determination of a person’s incapacity to refuse treatment with antipsychotic medication to remain in effect only for the duration of the 72-hour period or initial 14-day intensive treatment period, or both, until capacity is restored, or by court determination.This bill would additionally require the determination of a person’s incapacity to refuse treatment with antipsychotic medication to remain in effect for the duration of the additional 14-day period or the additional 30-day period after the 14-day intensive treatment period, or the additional period of up to 30 days if certain conditions are met during the first 30-day period.

CA SB 1196 - Catherine S. Blakespear
End of Life Option Act.
04/09/2024 - Set for hearing April 23 in JUD. pending receipt.
SB 1196, as amended, Blakespear. End of Life Option Act. Existing law, the End of Life Option Act, until January 1, 2031, authorizes an adult who meets certain qualifications, including, among other things, being a resident of the State of California, and who has been determined by their attending physician to be suffering from a terminal disease, as defined, to make a request for an aid-in-dying drug for the purpose of ending their life. Existing law establishes the procedures for making these requests, including that 2 oral requests be made a minimum of 48 hours apart and that a specified form to request an aid-in-dying drug be submitted, under specified circumstances. Existing law requires specified information to be documented in the individual’s medical record, including, among other things, all oral and written requests for an aid-in-dying drug. Existing law prescribes specified forms that attending and consulting physicians are required to submit to the State Department of Public Health and authorizes the Medical Board of California to update these forms.This bill would replace the term “terminal disease” for purposes of the act with “grievous and irremediable medical condition,” defined as a medical condition that (1) is a serious and incurable illness or disease, (2) has placed the individual in a state of irreversible decline in capability and the individual’s suffering is palpable without prospect of improvement, (3) is causing the individual to endure physical suffering due to the illness, disease, or state of decline that is intolerable to the individual and cannot be relieved in a manner the individual deems acceptable, and there is no proven treatment for the individual’s situation that the individual has not attempted or is willing to attempt due to the nature or side effects of the treatment, and (4) after taking into account all of the individual’s medical circumstances, it is reasonably foreseeable that the condition will become the individual’s natural cause of death, as specified. The bill would, for purposes of the act, include a diagnosis of dementia as a grievous and irremediable medical condition, if the individual meets specified capacity requirements. The bill would specify that a sole diagnosis of a mental disorder is not a grievous and irremediable medical condition. The bill would also expand the definition of “mental health specialist” to include neurologists.The bill would additionally authorize the self-administration of an aid-in-dying drug through intravenous injection. The bill would repeal the January 1, 2031, expiration date of the act, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program by extending the operation of crimes for specified violations of the act. The bill would make certain technical, nonsubstantive changes to these provisions.The bill would delete the prescribed forms described above and instead require the Medical Board of California to develop and update an attending physician compliance form, a consulting physician form, and an attending physician followup form that meet certain requirements and include specified information.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 120 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Human services.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 120, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Human services. (1) Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of community care facilities, including group home facilities, short-term residential therapeutic programs (STRTPs), and adult residential facilities (ARFs), by the State Department of Social Services. Under existing law, the department similarly regulates residential care facilities for the elderly. A violation of provisions relating to these facilities is a misdemeanor. Existing law requires administrators of these facilities, with specified exemptions, to complete a department-approved certification program, uniformly referred to as administrator certification training programs. Under existing law, these programs require a specified minimum number of hours, depending on the facility type, of classroom instruction that provides training on a uniform core of knowledge in specified areas. Existing law also requires administrator certificates to be renewed every 2 years, conditional upon the certificate holder submitting documentation of a specified number of hours of continuing education, based on the facility type. Existing law permits up to one-half of the required continuing education hours to be satisfied through online courses, and the remainder to be completed in a classroom instructional setting, as prescribed.This bill would revise those provisions by deleting the classroom instruction requirement for initial certification and continuing education purposes, and instead would require instruction that is conducive to learning and allows participants to simultaneously interact with each other as well as with the instructor. The bill would authorize up to one-half of continuing education hours to be satisfied through self-paced courses, rather than online courses. The bill would make various conforming changes.Existing law authorizes the department to license as ARFs, subject to specified conditions, adult residential facilities for persons with special health care needs (ARFPSHNs), which provide 24-hour services to up to 5 adults with developmental disabilities who have special health care and intensive support needs, as defined. Existing law requires the department to ensure that an ARFPSHN meets specified administrative requirements, including requirements related to fingerprinting and criminal records.This bill additionally would require an ARFPSHN to meet the administrator certification requirements of an ARF, including, but not limited to, completing a department-approved administrator certification training program requiring a designated minimum number of hours of instruction conducive to learning, in which participants are able to simultaneously interact with each other as well as with the instructor, that provides training on the uniform core of knowledge applicable to ARFs, as specified. The bill would require an applicant for an administrator’s certificate to submit an application for certification to the department and pass an examination, as prescribed.Because a violation of the above-described requirements would be a crime, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.Existing law includes within the definition of a community care facility, full-service adoption agencies and noncustodial adoption agencies, both of which are licensed entities authorized to provide specified adoption services. Under existing law, a facility is deemed to be an unlicensed community care facility and maintained and operated to provide nonmedical care if it is unlicensed, not exempt from licensure, and if it satisfies one of several specified conditions, including, among others, performing any of the functions of an adoption agency or holding itself out as performing any of the functions of an adoption agency, as specified. Existing law prohibits the operation of an unlicensed community care facility in the state and makes a violation of these p

CA SB 121 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Developmental services.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 121, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Developmental services. (1) Existing law establishes the State Department of Developmental Services, and vests in the department jurisdiction over various state developmental centers for the provision of care to persons with developmental disabilities. Existing law establishes the State Department of State Hospitals within the California Health and Human Services Agency, and provides the department with jurisdiction over specified facilities for the care and treatment of persons with mental health disorders.Existing law requires that every individual with exceptional needs, as defined, who is eligible be provided with educational instruction, services, or both, at no cost to their parent or guardian or, as appropriate, to them. A free appropriate public education is required to be made available to individuals with exceptional needs in accordance with specified federal regulations adopted pursuant to the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Existing law recognizes that individuals with exceptional needs of mandated schoolage residing in California’s state hospitals and developmental centers are entitled, under specified federal law, to have the same access to educational programs as is provided for individuals with exceptional needs residing in the community, and establishes contracting and funding provisions for that purpose. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Director of Developmental Services, and the Director of State Hospitals to develop written interagency agreements to carry out the provisions relating to educational programs for individuals with exceptional needs residing in those facilities.Existing law requires the transfer of pupils in state hospital school programs whose individualized education programs indicate that a community school program is appropriate to be transferred to schools located in the community. Existing law authorizes waivers to that requirement only when approved by both the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Director of Developmental Services. Existing law requires the State Department of Developmental Services, on the first day of each month, upon submission of an invoice by the county superintendent of schools, to pay to the county superintendent of schools 8% of the amount projected to cover the cost of hospital pupils educated in community school programs, as specified. Existing law requires the county superintendent of schools to calculate the actual cost of educating those pupils and, if the actual cost is more or less than the projected amount, requires the following year’s distribution to be adjusted accordingly.This bill would authorize waivers described above to be approved by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and either the State Department of Developmental Services, for individuals receiving developmental disability services, or the State Department of State Hospitals, for individuals receiving mental health services, as specified. The bill would require the State Department of State Hospitals, rather than the State Department of Developmental Services, to make payments to county superintendents of schools with respect to pupils under the State Department of State Hospital’s jurisdiction who are being educated in community school programs. The bill additionally would revise those payment provisions to require the relevant department to pay the entire amount invoiced by the county superintendent of schools, and would require an adjustment to the county’s distribution to be adjusted in the following year only if the actual cost is greater than the amount invoiced by the county superintendent of schools. The bill would update existing references to state hospitals to also refer to developmental centers, and would make various other technical changes, and delete obsolete provisions.(2) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (act)

CA SB 1238 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Lanterman-Petris-Short Act: designated facilities.
04/11/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on JUD. (Ayes 11. Noes 0.) (April 10). Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
SB 1238, as amended, Eggman. Lanterman-Petris-Short Act: designated facilities. Under existing law, the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (act), when a person, as a result of a mental health disorder, is a danger to others or to themselves, or gravely disabled, as defined, the person may, upon probable cause, be taken into custody for a period of up to 72 hours for assessment, evaluation, and crisis intervention, or placement for evaluation and treatment in a facility designated by the county for evaluation and treatment and approved by the State Department of Health Care Services.Existing law defines the above-described designated facility as a facility that is licensed or certified as a mental health treatment facility or a hospital by the State Department of Public Health, and may include, but is not limited to, a licensed psychiatric hospital, a licensed psychiatric health facility, and a certified crisis stabilization unit.This bill would expand the definition of a “facility designated by the county for evaluation and treatment” or “designated facility” by specifying that it may also include a facility that both (1) has appropriate services, personnel, and security to safely treat individuals being held involuntarily and (2) is licensed or certified as a skilled nursing facility, mental health rehabilitation center, social rehabilitation facility, or as a facility capable of providing treatment at American Society of Addiction Medicine levels of care 3.7 to 4.0, inclusive. The bill would authorize a county to designate a facility for the purpose of providing one or more specified treatments required by the act. Existing regulations prohibit a licensed psychiatric health facility or licensed mental health rehabilitation center from admitting an individual who is diagnosed only with a substance use disorder.This bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services to authorize licensed psychiatric health facilities and licensed mental health rehabilitation centers to admit an individual who is diagnosed only with a severe substance use disorder, as defined.Existing law requires a person admitted to a facility for 72-hour treatment and evaluation to receive an evaluation as soon as possible after the person is admitted and to receive whatever treatment and care the person’s condition requires for the full period that they are held, as specified.This bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services to ensure that designated facilities are reimbursed for evaluation and treatment of stand-alone substance use disorders at reimbursement rates equivalent to those provided for evaluation and treatment of mental health disorders.This bill would authorize the State Department of Health Care Services to implement, interpret, or make specific these provisions, in whole or in part, by means of information notices, provider bulletins, or other similar instructions, without taking any further regulatory action.

CA SB 1241 - Steve Padilla
Safety and Violence Education for (SAVE) Students Act.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1241, as amended, Padilla. Safety and Violence Education for (SAVE) Students Act. (1) Existing law requires the governing board or body of a local educational agency that serves pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 6, inclusive, and that serves pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to adopt and maintain a policy on pupil suicide prevention that addresses, among other things, any training on suicide awareness and prevention to be provided to teachers of pupils in all of the grades served by the local educational agency. Existing law, commencing with the 2024–25 school year, encourages local educational agencies to provide that training to those teachers. Existing law requires the State Department of Education to identify one or more evidence-based online training programs that a local educational agency can use to train school staff and pupils as part of the local educational agency’s policy on pupil suicide prevention.This bill would separately require the State Department of Education, in consultation with the Department of Justice and the California Health and Human Services Agency, to maintain a list of approved training programs for instruction in suicide awareness and prevention and safety training and violence prevention. The bill would require the approved training programs to be evidence based and to include specified information, including, among other information, how to instruct school personnel to identify the signs and symptoms of depression, suicide, and self-harm in pupils, and how to instruct pupils to identify the signs and symptoms of depression, suicide, and self-harm in their peers. The bill would require these approved training programs to be in addition to the above-described evidence-based online training programs that a local educational agency can use to train school staff and pupils as part of the local educational agency’s policy on pupil suicide prevention unless the State Department of Education, in consultation with the Department of Justice and the California Health and Human Services Agency, determines that the training program satisfies all of the requirements specified in the bill. The bill would require the State Department of Education, in consultation with the Department of Justice and the California Health and Human Services Agency, to also maintain a list of approved training programs for instruction in social inclusion, as specified. For each topic, the bill would require the approved training programs to include at least one option that is free or of no cost to school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools, and would require all of the approved training programs to be posted on the State Department of Education’s internet website.The bill would, commencing July 1, 2027, require each school district, county office of education, and charter school serving any of grades 6 to 12, inclusive, to annually provide at least one hour of, or one standard class period per school year of, evidence-based instruction, per topic, based upon the above-described trainings, on each of suicide awareness and prevention, safety training and violence prevention, and social inclusion, except as provided. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(2) Under existing law, each school district and county office of education is responsible for the overall development of a comprehensive school safety plan for each of its schools operating kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive, in cooperation with certain local entities. Existing law requires the comprehensive school safety plan to include, among other things, the development of procedures for conducting tactical responses to criminal incidents, including procedures related to individuals with guns on school campuses and at school-related functions and procedures to assess and respond to reports of any dangerous, violent, or unlawful activity that is being cond

CA SB 1256 - Steven M. Glazer
Crimes: prostitution: DNA collection.
04/16/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (April 16). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1256, as amended, Glazer. Crimes: prostitution: DNA collection. Existing law, as amended by the DNA Fingerprint, Unsolved Crime and Innocence Protection Act, Proposition 69, approved by the voters at the November 2, 2004, general election, requires a person who has been convicted of a felony offense to provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required for law enforcement identification analysis. Existing law makes these provisions retroactive, regardless of when the crime charged or committed became a qualifying offense. The Legislature may amend Proposition 69 by a statute passed in each house by majority vote, as specified.This bill would expand these provisions to require persons convicted of soliciting, agreeing to engage in, or engaging in, an act of prostitution with a minor in exchange for providing money or compensation to the minor to provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required for law enforcement identification analysis. By imposing additional duties on local law enforcement agencies to collect and forward these samples, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 127 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
State government.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 127, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. State government. (1) Existing law, the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act, among other things, requires a business that provides an online service, product, or feature likely to be accessed by children to comply with specified requirements, including a requirement to configure all default privacy settings offered by the online service, product, or feature to the settings that offer a high level of privacy, unless the business can demonstrate a compelling reason that a different setting is in the best interests of children, and to provide privacy information, terms of service, policies, and community standards concisely, prominently, and using clear language suited to the age of children likely to access that online service, product, or feature.Existing law establishes the California Children’s Data Protection Working Group to deliver a report to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2024, and every 2 years thereafter, regarding best practices for the implementation of these provisions, as specified. Existing law requires the working group to select a chair and a vice chair from among its members and requires the working group to consist of 10 members, as specified.This bill would specify that the working group is within the Office of the Attorney General, and would require the report to, instead, be delivered on or before July 1, 2024, and every 2 years thereafter. The bill would instead require the working group to consist of 9 members, as specified. The bill would permit meetings of the working group to be conducted by means of remote communication, as specified.(2) The California Constitution generally prohibits the total annual appropriations subject to limitation of the state and each local government from exceeding the appropriations limit of the entity of government for the prior fiscal year, adjusted for the change in the cost of living and the change in population, and prescribes procedures for making adjustments to the appropriations limit. The California Constitution defines “appropriations subject to limitation” of the state to mean any authorization to expend during a fiscal year the proceeds of taxes levied by or for the state, exclusive of, among other things, state subventions for the use and operation of local government, except as specified. The California Constitution defines “appropriations subject to limitation” of an entity of local government to mean any authorization to expend during a fiscal year the proceeds of taxes levied by or for that entity and the proceeds of state subventions to that entity, except as specified, exclusive of refunds of taxes.Existing statutory provisions implementing these constitutional provisions establish the procedure for establishing the appropriations limit of the state and of each local jurisdiction for each fiscal year. Under existing law, revenues and appropriations for a local jurisdiction include subventions and with respect to the state, revenues and appropriations exclude those subventions. Existing law defines, for those purposes, “state subventions” as only including money received by a local agency from the state, the use of which is unrestricted by the statute providing the subvention.For fiscal years commencing with the 2020–21 fiscal year, existing law defines “state subventions” to additionally include money provided to a local agency pursuant to certain state programs and requires any money received by a local agency pursuant to that provision to be included within the appropriations limit of the local agency, up to the full appropriations limit of the local agency, as prescribed.This bill would require the Department of Finance to, no later than February 1 of each year, calculate the individual subvention amounts for each of those state programs and provide this information on an annual basis to the California State Association of Counties and the League of California Cities for distribu

CA SB 1282 - Lola Smallwood-Cuevas
Crimes: diversion.
04/03/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB S.
SB 1282, as amended, Smallwood-Cuevas. Crimes: diversion. Existing law authorizes a city or county prosecuting attorney or county probation department to create a diversion or deferred entry of judgment program for persons who commit a theft offense or repeat theft offenses, as specified.This bill would instead require each county to, on or before January 1, 2026, create that diversion or deferred entry of judgment program. By increasing duties on local entities, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law authorizes a judge in the superior court in which a misdemeanor is being prosecuted to, at the judge’s discretion, offer diversion to a defendant for a period not to exceed 24 months.This bill would expand that authorization to include any cases being prosecuted, as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 1285 - Dawn Addis
Driver’s licenses: disability identifier.
04/11/2024 - Set for hearing April 23.
SB 1285, as introduced, Laird. Driver’s licenses: disability identifier. Existing law requires that each application for an original or a renewal of a driver’s license contain certain information, including the applicant’s true full name, age, and gender. Existing law also requires the application for a driver’s license or identification card to contain certain specified elements, including, among other things, whether the applicant has served in the Armed Forces of the United States and a space for an applicant to enroll in the Donate Life California Organ and Tissue Donor Registry.This bill would require the application forms for a driver’s license or identification card to contain a space for a person to voluntarily disclose that the applicant has a disability, as defined by the federal American with Disabilities Act (ADA), and that the disability interferes with the person’s ability to effectively communicate with a peace officer. The bill would require the disclosed disability to be certified by a licensed health professional, as specified, on appropriate forms to be developed by the Department of Motor Vehicles.The bill would require the department to develop an appropriate disability identifier symbol to be placed on a driver’s license or identification card that is discreet and represents all types of disabilities, as specified. The bill would provide that a person may choose to no longer have a disability identifier symbol placed on the person’s driver’s license or identification card and would prohibit the department from retaining any information related to the person’s disability. The bill would require the department to issue a new driver’s license or identification card without a disability identifier symbol upon request.The bill would require the department to work with the Department of the California Highway Patrol and other relevant stakeholders to develop peace officer training on the voluntary disability identifier symbol, recognizing persons with disabilities, appropriate interactions with persons with disabilities, resources available to persons with disabilities and those interacting with persons with disabilities, and the requirements of the ADA. The bill would require the department, on or before January 1, 2028, to provide a report to the Legislature and relevant policy committees detailing the disability identifier symbol program and the percentage of persons issued a driver’s license or identification card who requested a disability identifier symbol.This bill would make the above provisions operative on January 1, 2027.

CA SB 129 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Housing.
06/26/2023 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on BUDGET.
SB 129, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Housing. (1) Existing law establishes the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency for purposes of carrying out state housing policies and programs, and creates in HCD the California Housing Finance Agency.This bill would remove the California Housing Finance Agency from within HCD. This bill would continue the existence of the California Housing Finance Agency in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency.This bill would also make technical, conforming changes and would delete obsolete references.(2) Existing federal law authorizes the United States Secretary of Agriculture to extend financial assistance through multifamily housing direct loan and grant programs to serve very low, low-, and moderate-income households, including, among other programs, Section 515 Rural Rental Housing Loans, which are mortgages to provide affordable rental housing for very low, low-, and moderate-income families, elderly persons, and persons with disabilities.Existing law establishes a low-income housing tax credit program pursuant to which the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee provides procedures and requirements for the allocation, in modified conformity with federal law, of state insurance, personal income, and corporation tax credit amounts to qualified low-income housing projects that have been allocated, or qualify for, a federal low-income housing tax credit and farmworker housing. Existing law requires not less than 20% of the low-income housing tax credits available annually to be set aside for allocation to rural areas. Existing law defines “rural area” for purposes of the low-income housing tax credit program as an area, which, on January 1 of any calendar year, satisfies any number of certain criteria, including being eligible for financing under the Section 515 program, or successor program, of the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development. This bill would expand the above-described criteria relating to Section 515 eligibility to instead include eligibility for financing under a multifamily housing program, as specified, or successor program, of the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development. Existing law also includes in the definition of “rural area” an unincorporated area that adjoins a city having a population of 40,000 or less, provided that the city and its adjoining unincorporated area are not located within a census tract designated as an urbanized area by the United States Census Bureau.This bill would revise the definition of “rural area” to include an unincorporated area that adjoins a city having a population of 40,000 or less, provided that the unincorporated area is not located within a census tract, block group, or block designated as an urban area by the United States Census Bureau in the most recent decennial census. The bill would also include in the definition of “rural area” an unincorporated area that does not adjoin a city, provided that the unincorporated area is not located within a census tract, block group, or block designated as an urban area by the United States Census Bureau in the most recent decennial census.(3) Existing law, the Planning and Zoning Law, requires a city or county to adopt a general plan for land use development within its boundaries that includes, among other things, a housing element. The law requires HCD to determine whether the housing element is in substantial compliance with specified provisions of that law. Existing law requires HCD to designate jurisdictions as prohousing pursuant to emergency regulations adopted by HCD, as prescribed. Existing law awards jurisdictions that are in substantial compliance with specified provisions and that are prohousing additional points or preference in the scoring of applications for specified state programs, including, among others, the Affordable Housing and Sustainabl

CA SB 1290 - Richard Dale Roth
Health care coverage: essential health benefits.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 22.
SB 1290, as introduced, Roth. Health care coverage: essential health benefits. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, requires the Department of Managed Health Care to license and regulate health care service plans and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Other existing law requires the Department of Insurance to regulate health insurers. Existing law requires an individual or small group health care service plan contract or health insurance policy issued, amended, or renewed on or after January 1, 2017, to include, at a minimum, coverage for essential health benefits pursuant to the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or health insurance policy to cover the same health benefits that the benchmark plan, the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan Small Group HMO 30 plan, offered during the first quarter of 2014, as specified.This bill would express the intent of the Legislature to review California’s essential health benefits benchmark plan and establish a new benchmark plan for the 2027 plan year. The bill would limit the applicability of the current benchmark plan benefits to plan years on or before the 2027 plan year.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 1306 - Nancy Skinner
Recycling: rare earth metals: report.
04/16/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on E.Q. (Ayes 12. Noes 0.) (April 15). Re-referred to Com. on E.Q.
SB 1306, as amended, Skinner. Recycling: rare earth metals: report. Existing law establishes the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development to serve the Governor as the lead entity for economic strategy and the marketing of California on issues relating to business development, private sector investment, and economic growth.This bill would require the office, in consultation with the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery and the Department of Toxic Substances Control, to draft and submit a report to the Legislature relating to the in-state collection, recycling, reuse, and stockpiling for domestic consumption of rare earth elements contained within products in the state, as specified. The bill would require the office to provide opportunities for public input and to perform outreach to potentially interested parties, as specified.

CA SB 1317 - Aisha Wahab
Inmates: psychiatric medication: informed consent.
04/03/2024 - Set for hearing April 16.
SB 1317, as introduced, Wahab. Inmates: psychiatric medication: informed consent. Existing law prohibits, except as specified, a person sentenced to imprisonment in a county jail from being administered any psychiatric medication without prior informed consent. Existing law authorizes a county department of mental health, or other designated county department, to administer to an inmate involuntary medication on a nonemergency basis only after the inmate is provided, among other things, a hearing before a superior court judge, a court-appointed commissioner or referee, or a court-appointed hearing officer.Existing law, until January 1, 2025, additionally protects all inmates in a county jail from being administered any psychiatric medication without prior informed consent, with certain exceptions, and imposes additional criteria that must be satisfied before a county department of mental health or other designated county department may administer involuntary medication, including a requirement that the jail first make a documented attempt to locate an available bed for the inmate in a community-based treatment facility, under certain conditions, in lieu of seeking involuntary administration of psychiatric medication. Until January 1, 2025, if an inmate is awaiting resolution of a criminal case, existing law requires that a hearing to administer involuntary medication on a nonemergency basis be held before, and that any requests for ex parte orders be submitted to, a judge in the superior court where the criminal case is pending. Existing law, also until January 1, 2025, sets limits on the amount of time such orders are valid and requires any court-ordered psychiatric medication to be administered in consultation with a psychiatrist who is not involved in the treatment of the inmate at the jail, if one is available.This bill would make the above changes permanent.

CA SB 1318 - Aisha Wahab
Pupil health: suicide prevention policies: pupil suicide crisis.
04/15/2024 - April 15 hearing: Placed on APPR suspense file.
SB 1318, as amended, Wahab. Pupil health: suicide prevention policies: pupil suicide crisis. Existing law requires the governing board or body of a county office of education, school district, state special school, or charter school that serves pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, to adopt a policy on pupil suicide prevention that specifically addresses, among other things, procedures relating to suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention, and any training on suicide awareness and prevention to be provided to teachers of pupils in all of the grades served by the local educational agency. Existing law requires the governing board or body of a local educational agency that serves pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, to review, at minimum every 5th year, its policy on pupil suicide prevention and, if necessary, update its policy.This bill would require, on or before July 1, 2026, the policy to also address crisis intervention protocols that local educational agencies are required to follow in the event of a pupil suicide crisis, as defined, including the process by which staff and external agencies are deployed to address a pupil suicide crisis, limiting the involvement and notification of law enforcement to situations in which a pupil’s life is in imminent danger and their needs cannot be addressed by a mental health professional, and the process for informing the parent or guardian of the pupil experiencing the suicide crisis, as provided. The bill would require, at each meeting of the governing board or body of a local educational agency when the governing board or body reviews its policy on pupil suicide prevention, if the local educational agency does not have a school mental health professional, as defined, or contract with a mental health professional, as defined, the governing board or body to discuss whether funding should be identified for purposes of hiring a school mental health professional. By imposing additional duties on local educational agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 1320 - Aisha Wahab
Mental health and substance use disorder treatment.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 22.
SB 1320, as amended, Wahab. Mental health and substance use disorder treatment. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of disability insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy issued, amended, or renewed on or after January 1, 2021, to provide coverage for medically necessary treatment of mental health and substance use disorders, as defined, under the same terms and conditions applied to other medical conditions.This bill would require a plan or insurer subject to the above-described coverage requirement, and its delegates, to establish a process to reimburse providers for mental health and substance use disorder treatment services that are integrated with primary care services and provided under a contract or policy issued, amended, or renewed on or after July 1, 2025. Because a willful violation of these provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 1323 - Henry I. Stern
Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial.
04/09/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 4. Noes 1.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1323, as amended, Menjivar. Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial. (1) Existing law prohibits a person from being tried or adjudged to punishment while that person is mentally incompetent. Existing law establishes a process by which a defendant’s mental competency is evaluated and if the defendant is found incompetent to stand trial, the proceedings are suspended while the defendant receives treatment, with the goal of restoring the defendant to competency.Existing law, if a doubt is raised as to the mental competence of a defendant, requires the court, either on the request of counsel or on its own motion, to hold a hearing, as specified, to determine the mental competence of the defendant.This bill would instead, in lieu of a hearing, allow an evaluation of the defendant by one or 2 licensed psychologists or psychiatrists and would require them to submit a report, as specified, to the court. The bill would allow the court, if neither party objects to the reports of these experts, to make a determination based upon these reports. The bill would additionally, declaratory of existing case law, clarify that any statement made by a defendant during an examination by these mental health experts shall not be admissible in any other proceeding.This bill would, if either party objects to the court making a determination based on the reports, require a hearing to be held to determine the competence of the defendant. The bill would apply a presumption of competence to the defendant and would place the burden of proof upon the party seeking a finding of incompetence. The bill would, as specified, require the hearing to be held by jury trial or bench trial.(2) Existing law, in the case of a defendant charged with a felony, requires that, upon a finding of mental incompetence, the proceedings be suspended until the defendant regains competence. Existing law prescribes a program of pretrial diversion for defendants with a diagnosed mental disorder whose disorder was a significant factor in the commission of their offense. Under existing law, persons charged with certain offenses, including murder, rape, sexual abuse of a child, and possession of a weapon of mass destruction, are ineligible for diversion.This bill would require the court, upon a finding of mental incompetence of a defendant charged with a felony that is not ineligible for diversion, to determine if it is in the interests of justice to restore the defendant to competence. The bill would require the court, if the restoration of the defendant’s mental competence is not in the interests of justice, to hold a hearing to consider granting mental health diversion or other programs to the defendant, as specified.If a defendant is returned to court having not been restored to mental competence, this bill would require the defendant to be presumed incompetent and be returned to treatment, as specified.(3) The bill would make other conforming changes.

CA SB 133 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Courts.
06/30/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 34, Statutes of 2023.
SB 133, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Courts. (1) The California Constitution vests the judicial power of the state in the Supreme Court, courts of appeal, and superior courts, and establishes the Judicial Council to, among other things, adopt rules of court and perform functions prescribed by statute. Existing law, the Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law, authorizes and regulates the formation and operation of, among others, nonprofit public benefit corporations.This bill would establish the California Access to Justice Commission, a nonprofit public benefit corporation, and would authorize the commission to receive funding appropriated by the Legislature. The bill would specify the membership of the commission and terms of the members. The bill would specify the purposes for which the commission may receive and use funding including, among others, providing ongoing leadership in efforts to achieve full and equal access to justice for all Californians. The bill would make the commission subject to the Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law and would set the public meeting requirements for the commission.(2) Existing law, the State Bar Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of attorneys by the State Bar of California, a public corporation. Existing law requires an attorney or law firm receiving or disbursing trust funds to establish and maintain an Interest On Lawyers’ Trust Accounts (IOLTA) account in which the attorney or law firm is required to deposit or invest specified client deposits or funds. Existing law requires interest and dividends earned on IOLTA accounts to be paid to the State Bar of California and used for programs providing civil legal services without charge to indigent persons. Existing law requires the State Bar of California to distribute IOLTA funds and specified other funds to qualified legal service projects and qualified support centers, as defined, for the provision of civil legal services without charge to indigent persons in accordance with a specified statutory scheme. Existing law authorizes qualified legal services projects and qualified support centers to use the funds to provide work opportunities with pay and scholarships for disadvantaged law students to help defray their law school expenses, among other purposes.This bill would authorize qualified legal service projects and qualified support centers to also use the funds to provide loan repayment assistance for the purposes of recruiting and retaining attorneys in accordance with a loan repayment assistance program administered by the California Access to Justice Commission. The bill would appropriate $250,000 from the General Fund to the Judicial Council to provide funding to the California Access to Justice Commission to administer a tax advantaged student loan repayment assistance program for service providers employed by qualified legal service projects and support centers, as specified.(3) Existing law establishes the Appellate Court Trust Fund, the proceeds of which shall be used for the purpose of funding the courts of appeal and the Supreme Court. Existing law requires the funds, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to be apportioned by the Judicial Council to the courts of appeal and the Supreme Court taking into consideration all other funds available and the needs of each court in a manner that promotes equal access to the courts, ensures the ability of the courts to carry out their functions, and promotes implementation of statewide policies.This bill would authorize the funds to be apportioned by the Judicial Council to the Supreme Court, courts of appeal, and the Judicial Council, taking into consideration all other funds available to each and the needs of each.(4) Existing law generally requires the superior court, as an employer, to provide employees with the use of a lactation room or other location for employees to express milk in private, including, among other things, a clean and safe place to s

CA SB 1334 - Josh Newman
Substance use disorder treatment: licensing.
04/03/2024 - Set for hearing April 24.
SB 1334, as introduced, Newman. Substance use disorder treatment: licensing. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license and regulate facilities that provide residential nonmedical services to adults who are recovering from problems related to alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug misuse or abuse, and who need alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug recovery treatment or detoxification services. Existing law requires a licensed facility to disclose specified information to the department, including ownership or control of, or financial interest in, a recovery residence, defined as a residential dwelling that provides primary housing for individuals who seek a cooperative living arrangement that supports personal recovery from a substance use disorder and that does not require licensure by the department or does not provide licensable services, and requires the department to conduct a site visit of a disclosed recovery residence if it is alleged to be providing recovery, treatment, or detoxification services.This bill would define a recovery residence, for purposes of licensing alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities, as a residential dwelling that provides primary housing for individuals who seek a cooperative living arrangement that supports personal recovery from a substance use disorder, does not require licensure by the department, and does not provide licensable services, and would clarify that an unlicensed recovery residence may provide services to its residents, including, but not limited to, dining, housekeeping, security, transportation, and recreation. The bill would exempt recovery residences from being required to be licensed as an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility if the facility does not offer recovery services, as defined, and would allow residents of a recovery residence to actively participate in recovery services outside of the home. The bill would require a recovery residence to be operated as a separate business from a licensed facility and require the recovery residence to maintain separate agreements with each resident for the housing and services it provides.Existing law declares that it is the policy of the state that each county and city shall permit and encourage the development of sufficient numbers and types of alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facilities as are commensurate with local need. Existing law requires an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility that serves 6 or fewer persons to be considered a residential use of property for the purposes of local regulation, regardless of whether or not unrelated persons are living together.This bill would additionally consider recovery residences that serve 6 or fewer people to be considered a residential use of property for the purposes of local regulation. The bill would authorize local jurisdictions to require a use permit or conditional use permit for an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility or a recovery residence that serves 7 or more residents, and allow local jurisdictions to require those facilities to be at least 1,000 feet from another state-licensed alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility or recovery residence as part of the use permit.

CA SB 1339 - Benjamin J. Allen
Supportive community residences.
04/15/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
SB 1339, as amended, Allen. Supportive community residences. Existing law generally requires the State Department of Public Health to license, inspect, and regulate health facilities, defined to include, among other types of health facilities, an acute psychiatric hospital. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license and establish regulations for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services to license and regulate facilities that provide residential nonmedical services to adults who are recovering from problems related to alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug misuse or abuse, and who need alcohol, drug, or alcohol and drug recovery treatment or detoxification services. Existing law also requires the department to implement a voluntary certification program for alcohol and other drug treatment recovery services.Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, generally provides for the licensing and regulation of community care facilities by the State Department of Social Services, to provide 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance. Existing regulation includes an adult residential facility as a community care facility for those purposes.This bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services (department), by January 1, 2027, and in consultation with relevant public agencies and stakeholders, to establish, and provide for the administration of, a voluntary certification program for supportive community residences. The bill would define a “supportive community residence” as a residential home serving adults with a substance use disorder, mental health diagnosis, or dual diagnosis that does not provide medical care or a level of support for activities of daily living that require state licensing. The bill would require the certification program to include standards and procedures for operation, such as types of certifications needed and supportive services navigation, and procedures and penalties for enforcing laws and regulations governing supportive community residences. The bill also would require the department to create and maintain a searchable online database of certified facilities, which would include specified contact and complaint information for those residences.The bill would require the department to adopt or amend regulations to require referring entities to provide information relating to the license or certification status of community care facilities and supportive community residences to individuals with a substance use disorder, mental health diagnosis, or dual diagnosis, and to report any suspected fraudulent license or certification identified during verification to the appropriate entity. The bill would define “referring entity” to include a state or local entity, or a state-regulated entity that provides adults with substance use disorders or mental health diagnoses with referrals to, or that authorizes health care coverage for, services provided by supportive community residences or licensed community care residential facilities. The bill also would require the regulations to include enforcement methods for willful and repeated violations of those requirements by referring entities.The bill would prohibit a supportive community residence from providing any licensed services onsite, including, but not limited to, incidental medical services. The bill would authorize the department to charge a fee for certification of supportive community residences in an amount not to exceed the reasonable cost of administering the program, not to exceed $1,000, and would establish the Supportive Community Residence Program Fund for collection of the fee. The bill would require the department, by January 1, 2027, in consultation with relevant state agencies and other stakeholders, to submit a report to the Legislature including recommendations for stat

CA SB 134 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Public safety trailer bill.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 134, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Public safety trailer bill. (1) Existing law, the California Public Records Act, authorizes the inspection and copying of any public record except where specifically prohibited by law. Existing law, with specified exemptions, makes confidential and exempts from disclosure the personnel records of peace officers and custodial records and certain other records maintained by their employing agencies. Existing law provides that this exemption from disclosure does not apply to investigations of these officers or their employing agencies and related proceedings conducted by a grand jury, a district attorney’s office, or the Attorney General’s office.Existing law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to, among other functions, certify the eligibility of those persons appointed as peace officers throughout the state. Existing law establishes the Peace Officer Standards Accountability Division within POST to review investigations conducted by law enforcement agencies and to conduct additional investigations into serious misconduct that may provide grounds for suspension or revocation of a peace officer’s certification.This bill would exempt from the aforementioned confidentiality provisions, investigations of peace officers and custodial officers or their employing agencies and related proceedings conducted by POST. This bill would provide that, until January 1, 2027, specified records in the possession of POST related to these functions are not public records subject to disclosure, although those same records may be subject to disclosure by the agency that employs or previously employed the peace officer.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.(2) Existing law requires the Department of Justice, on a monthly basis, to review the records in the statewide criminal justice databases and identify persons who are eligible for arrest record relief and automatic conviction record relief. Commencing on July 1, 2023, existing law makes arrest record relief available to a person who has been arrested for a felony, including a felony punishable in the state prison, as specified. Commencing on July 1, 2023, existing law makes conviction record relief available for a defendant convicted, on or after January 1, 2005, of a felony for which they did not complete probation without revocation if the defendant appears to have completed all terms of incarceration, probation, mandatory supervision, postrelease community supervision, and parole, and a period of 4 years has elapsed during which the defendant was not convicted of a new felony offense, except as specified.This bill would delay the implementation of these provisions until July 1, 2024. (3) Existing law authorizes the court, in its discretion and in the interest of justice in specified cases, to permit the defendant to withdraw their plea of guilty or nolo contendere and enter a plea of not guilty, or, if the defendant has been convicted after a plea of not guilty, to set aside the verdict of guilty, and to dismiss the accusations or information against the defendant and release the defendant from all penalties and disabilities resulting from the offense for which they have been convicted. Existing law authorizes a person who was under 18 years of age at the time of commission of a misdemeanor to, in specified circumstances, petition the court for an order sealing the record of conviction and other official records in the case. Existing law authorizes the court to require the defendant or petitioner in these circumstances to reimburse the court, city, and county for actual costs of services rende

CA SB 135 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Public safety.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 190, Statutes of 2023.
SB 135, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Public safety. (1) Existing law, operative as of January 1, 2024, will, in a case in which the party bearing the burden of proof proffers expert testimony regarding medical causation and the party’s expert is required as a condition of testifying to opine that causation exists to a reasonable medical probability, allow the party not bearing the burden of proof to offer the testimony of a contrary expert only if the expert can testify that a proffered alternative cause exists to a reasonable medical probability or that a matter cannot meet a reasonable degree of probability in the applicable field, as specified.This bill would, operative as of January 1, 2024, specify that the above provision applies only to general civil actions, as defined in the California Rules of Court.(2) Existing law authorizes the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to contract for the establishment and operation of separate community correctional reentry centers, as specified. Existing law authorizes the secretary to entertain proposals for the establishment and operation of community correctional reentry centers from public and private entities and requires that preference be given to community correctional reentry centers located near large population centers.This bill would authorize the department to enter into long-term contracts, not to exceed 10 years, for the transfer of prisoners to, or placement of prisoners in, facilities under contract pursuant to these provisions. The bill would require that the secretary advertise potential contracts under these provisions and would require that priority be given to certain community correctional reentry centers, as specified. The bill would prohibit the department, for contracts entered into on or after October 14, 2023, from contracting for the establishment of community correctional reentry centers located in current or former state prison facilities or on current or former state prison property.(3) Existing law requires the Department of Justice to provide subsequent state or federal arrest or disposition notification to the State Department of Social Services, the Medical Board of California, the Osteopathic Medical Board of California, and other authorized entities to assist in, among other things, fulfilling employment, licensing, or certification duties. Existing law requires an entity, other than a law enforcement agency, as defined, to enter into a contract with the Department of Justice in order to receive notification of subsequent state or federal arrests or dispositions for licensing, employment, or certification purposes.This bill would authorize the department to submit fingerprints to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, where they will be retained for the purpose of being searched against future submissions to the FBI, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to search latent fingerprint images against all retained fingerprint submissions. The bill would also authorize the department to collect fees for federal subsequent notification services and remit the fees to the FBI.Existing law authorizes a human resource agency or an employer to request from the Department of Justice records of all convictions or any arrest pending adjudication involving specified offenses of a person who applies for a license, employment, or volunteer position in which they would have supervisory or disciplinary power over a minor or any person under their care. Existing law requires a request for records to include the applicant’s fingerprints and any other data specified by the department. Existing law requires the department to furnish the information to the requesting employer and to send a copy of the information to the applicant.This bill would establish procedures for the department, human resource agency, and employer to follow when a request is made to the department for the conviction and arrest records described abo

CA SB 1353 - Aisha Wahab
Youth Bill of Rights.
04/08/2024 - In Assembly. Read first time. Held at Desk.
SB 1353, as introduced, Wahab. Youth Bill of Rights. Existing law establishes the Youth Bill of Rights for all youth confined in a juvenile facility, which includes the right to live in a safe, healthy, and clean environment conducive to treatment and rehabilitation, to contact attorneys, ombudspersons, and other advocates regarding conditions of confinement or violations of rights, and to receive a quality education.This bill would add to the Youth Bill of Rights the right to not be deprived of mental health resources, including daily access to counselors, therapists, mentors, or any related services necessary for mental well-being, rehabilitation, and the promotion of positive youth development while detained in a juvenile facility.

CA SB 1356 - Aisha Wahab
Judiciary: training: gender bias.
04/10/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
SB 1356, as amended, Wahab. Judiciary: training: gender bias. Existing law authorizes the Judicial Council to provide by rule of court for racial, ethnic, and gender bias, and sexual harassment training and training for any other bias based on sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, mental disability, physical disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, or sexual orientation for judges and subordinate judicial officers.This bill would require the Judicial Council, when developing any training on gender bias, to consider the role of gender in court proceedings and meeting the needs of litigants in unique situations of vulnerability.The bill would make related findings and declarations.

CA SB 137 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Health omnibus trailer bill.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 191, Statutes of 2023.
SB 137, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Health omnibus trailer bill. (1) The California Hospice Licensure Act of 1990 requires a person, political subdivision of the state, or other governmental agency to obtain a license from the State Department of Public Health to provide hospice services to an individual who is experiencing the last phase of life due to a terminal disease, as defined, and their family, except as provided. Existing law requires the department, by January 1, 2024, to adopt emergency regulations to implement the recommendations in a specified report of the California State Auditor. Existing law requires the department to maintain the general moratorium on new hospice agency licenses until the department adopts the regulations, but in no event later than March 29, 2024. Existing law requires the moratorium to end on the earlier of 2 years from the date that the California State Auditor publishes a report on hospice agency licensure, or the date the emergency regulations are adopted.This bill would instead require the moratorium to end on the date the emergency regulations are adopted and would extend the deadline by which the department is required to adopt those regulations to January 1, 2025.(2) Under existing law, the State Department of Health Care Services is responsible for licensing and certifying alcoholism and drug abuse recovery and treatment programs and facilities, including both residential and nonresidential programs. Existing law requires the department to charge a fee for the licensure or certification of these facilities and to evaluate licensing and certification fees annually, taking into consideration the overall cost of specified residential and outpatient licensing and certification activities of the department, plus a reasonable reserve. Existing law requires the department to submit proposed new fees or fee changes to the Legislature for approval, as specified, and prohibits new fees or fee changes without legislative approval. Existing law establishes the Residential and Outpatient Program Licensing Fund, consisting of fees, fines, and penalties collected from residential and outpatient programs.This bill would require any excess fees remaining in the Residential and Outpatient Program Licensing Fund at the end of each fiscal year to be carried forward and taken into consideration in setting the amount of fees imposed in the immediately subsequent fiscal year. The bill would authorize the department, no sooner than July 1, 2027, to approve a fee increase, up to and including 5 percent on an annual basis, as needed to address the costs of the licensing and certification activities described above. The bill would require the department to submit any proposed new fees or fee increases in excess of 5 percent to the Legislature for approval and would prohibit new fees or fee changes in excess of 5 percent to be implemented without legislative approval. The bill would require the department to develop a process for programs and facilities to apply for a hardship fee waiver and issue a provider bulletin detailing the application process for the hardship fee waiver that includes eligibility requirements for demonstrated need by July 1, 2024.Existing law requires the department to implement the licensing and certification provisions for alcoholism and drug abuse recovery and treatment programs and facilities through the Administrative Procedure Act. Existing law authorizes the department to implement new fees or fee changes by means of provider bulletins or similar action and to supersede the existing licensing and certification fees until the department amends the regulations. Existing law requires the department to notify and consult with interested parties and appropriate stakeholders regarding new fees or fee changes.This bill would remove the requirement that the department implement the licensing and certification provisions described above through the Administrative Procedures Act

CA SB 138 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Human services.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 192, Statutes of 2023.
SB 138, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Human services. (1) Existing law establishes the State Department of Developmental Services and vests in the department jurisdiction over various state hospitals, referred to as developmental centers, to provide care to persons with developmental disabilities. Existing law requires the department to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law requires a regional center to notify the appropriate regional resource development project when the regional center determines or is informed, as specified, that the community placement of a consumer is at risk of failing and that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is a likelihood or the regional center is notified by a court of a potential admission to an acute crisis home operated by the department.Existing law requires the department to notify the court, in writing, if the regional resource development project determines that a consumer cannot be safely served in an acute crisis home operated by the department, as specified.This bill would require the department, when the regional resource development project determines that a consumer cannot be safely served in an acute crisis home operated by the department, to continue to work jointly with the regional center to identify or develop alternative services and supports and implement the alternative services and supports that are identified or developed.Existing law prohibits the regional resource development project, in consultation with specific parties, from making a determination that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is necessary unless the determination includes a regional center report that details all considered community-based services and supports, including a crisis home and an explanation why the options could not meet the consumer’s needs.The bill would also require the determination that admittance to an acute crisis home is necessary to include consideration of a supported living arrangement, among other options. This bill would prohibit an acute crisis home operated by the department from utilizing specific interventions, including, among other things, prone restraints and seclusion, as defined.(2) Existing law requires the State Department of Developmental Services, no later than April 1, as specified, to submit a detailed plan to the Legislature whenever the department proposes the closure of a state developmental center. Existing law requires the department, in conjunction with the Governor’s proposed 2023–24 budget, to submit to the Legislature an updated version of a specified safety net plan regarding how the department will provide access to crisis services after the closure of a developmental center and how the state will maintain its role in providing residential services to those whom private sector vendors cannot or will not serve. Existing law requires the plan update, among other provisions, to evaluate the progress made to create a safety net, including services or residences intended to facilitate transitions or diversions from institutions for mental disease, the Canyon Springs Community Facility, the secure treatment program at Porterville Developmental Center, prisons or jails, or other restrictive settings.This bill would authorize the establishment of a residential program in the community for adolescents and adults with complex needs, as defined, as part of the safety net plan to provide access to crisis services, as described above. The bill would authorize the development of up to 3 complex needs homes, as defined, with a maximum capacity of 5 beds per home and would prohibit any stay in a complex needs home from exceeding 18 months, except as specified. The bill establishes certain procedures to be followed prior to, and following, a consumer’s admission to a complex needs home due to an acute crisis

CA SB 1385 - Richard Dale Roth
Medi-Cal: Supervising providers.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 22.
SB 1385, as amended, Roth. Medi-Cal: Supervising providers. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services through various delivery systems, including fee-for-service and managed care. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Under federal law, covered services include “preventive services,” which are defined as, services recommended by a physician or other licensed practitioner of the healing arts acting within the scope of authorized practice under state law to prevent disease, disability, and other health conditions or their progression, prolong life, and promote physical and mental health and efficiency. On July 26, 2022, the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved the department’s Medicaid State Plan Amendment to add community health workers as a preventive service. Under existing law, the department is required, through existing and regular stakeholder processes, to inform stakeholders about, and accept input from stakeholders on, implementation of the community health worker services benefit.This bill would require Medi-Cal managed care plans to adopt policies and procedures to effectuate a billing pathway for supervising providers, as defined, to claim for the provision of community health worker services to enrollees during an emergency department visit and as an outpatient followup to an emergency department visit that are consistent with guidance developed by the department pursuant to the stakeholder process described above. The bill would require the department to develop similar guidance to be used by supervising providers to claim for community health worker services to fee-for-service beneficiaries in the settings described above. The bill would define a “supervising provider” for purposes of these provisions as an enrolled Medi-Cal provider that submits claims for services provided by a community health worker, ensures that a community health worker meets the qualifications as required by the department, and directly or indirectly oversees community health workers and the services they deliver to Medi-Cal beneficiaries.

CA SB 1392 - Henry I. Stern
Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial.
04/11/2024 - Set for hearing April 23.
SB 1392, as introduced, Stern. Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial. Existing law prohibits a person who is found to be mentally incompetent to stand trial. Existing law requires a court, if a question is raised as to a defendant’s mental competence, to hold a hearing into the defendant’s mental competence. Existing law, if a defendant is found incompetent, requires the court to order the defendant to treatment for the restoration of competence. Under existing law, if the defendant’s competence is restored, the defendant is returned to the court with a certificate of restoration. Under existing law, if a defendant’s competence is not restored within 2 years of being declared incompetent, the defendant is either subject to conservatorship proceedings or released.This bill would make the issuance of a certificate of restoration toll the running of that 2-year period. The bill would additionally establish procedures for a trial by court on the question of mental competence of a defendant after a defendant has been issued a certificate of restoration, including, among other things, that the defendant shall be presumed restored to competence unless it is proved by a preponderance of the evidence that the defendant is mentally incompetent.

CA SB 1397 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Behavioral health services coverage.
04/16/2024 - Set for hearing April 22.
SB 1397, as amended, Eggman. Behavioral health services coverage. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health and disability insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy to provide coverage for medically necessary treatment of mental health and substance use disorders.This bill would require a health care service plan contract or health insurance policy issued, amended, renewed, or delivered on or after July 1, 2025, that covers medically necessary mental health and substance use disorder services to comply with rate and timely reimbursement requirements for services delivered by a county behavioral health agency, as specified. The bill would require in-network cost sharing, capped at the in-network deductible and in-network out-of-pocket maximum, to apply to these services. Unless an enrollee or insured is referred or authorized by the plan or insurer, the bill would require a county behavioral health agency to contact a plan or insurer before initiating services. The bill would authorize a plan or insurer to conduct a postclaim review to determine appropriate payment of a claim, and would authorize the use of prior authorization as permitted by the regulating department. The bill would require the departments to issue guidance to plans and insurers regarding compliance with these provisions no later than April 1, 2025. Because a willful violation of these provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, and the bill would impose a higher level of service on a county behavioral health agency, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, with regard to certain mandates, no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 14 - Miguel Santiago
Serious felonies: human trafficking.
09/13/2023 - Assembly amendments concurred in. (Ayes 39. Noes 0.) Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.
SB 14, as amended, Grove. Serious felonies: human trafficking. Existing law defines the term “serious felony” for various purposes, including, among others, enhancing the punishment for felonies pursuant to existing sentencing provisions commonly known as the Three Strikes Law.This bill would include human trafficking of a minor within the definition of a serious felony for all purposes, including for purposes of the Three Strikes Law, except as specified. By expanding the scope of an enhancement, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 140 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Early childcare and education.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 193, Statutes of 2023.
SB 140, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Early childcare and education. Existing law, the Child Care and Development Services Act, administered by the State Department of Social Services, establishes a system of childcare and development services for children up to 13 years of age. Existing law, the Early Education Act, among other things, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to administer all California state preschool programs, including, but not limited to, part-day and full-day developmentally and age-appropriate programs for 3- and 4-year-old children. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to coordinate with the State Department of Education and others to develop the state plan for purposes of the federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF).Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services, in collaboration with the State Department of Education, to implement a reimbursement system plan that establishes reasonable standards and assigned reimbursement rates. Existing law requires the state and Child Care Providers United - California to establish a Joint Labor Management Committee to develop recommendations for a single reimbursement rate structure that addresses quality standards for equity and accessibility while supporting positive learning and developmental outcomes for children, as specified. Existing law also requires the department, in collaboration with the State Department of Education, to develop and conduct an alternative methodology, as specified, in order to set reimbursement rates for state-subsidized childcare and development services.This bill would, among other things, require the State Department of Social Services to, no later than May 15, 2024, report the status of the draft CCDF state plan to specified budget subcommittees and the Legislative Analyst’s Office on the state’s proposed single rate structure, and to, no later than July 1, 2024, submit the necessary information to support use of a single rate structure utilizing the alternative methodology to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families in the state plan or an amendment to the state plan. The bill would also require the department to provide the same budget subcommittees and the Legislative Analyst’s Office with an outline of implementation components for the approved single rate structure within 60 days of federal approval of the single rate structure utilizing the alternative methodology in the state plan, and would require that single rate structure to apply to specified subsidized childcare and development programs under the department and state preschool programs under the State Department of Education.This bill would require, on or before March 1, 2024, a contractor operating a California state preschool program through a family childcare home education network and each county and contractor that reimburses childcare providers for the provision of state-funded subsidized childcare and development services to develop, implement, and publish a plan for timely payment to providers, as specified. This bill would allocate previously appropriated funds in the Budget Act of 2023 to the State Department of Social Services and State Department of Education to provide specified family childcare providers and childcare centers with a monthly cost of care plus rate commencing January 1, 2024, and through June 30, 2025, inclusive, and a one-time payment, as specified.Existing law previously appropriated funds for the establishment of the Joint Child Care Providers United - State of California Training Partnership Fund and to establish a health care benefits trust administered by Child Care Providers United - California, as specified.This bill would allocate additional funds for those purposes, as specified. The bill would also appropriate $100,0000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Social Services for a one-time contribut

CA SB 1400 - Henry I. Stern
Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial.
04/11/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on PUB S.
SB 1400, as amended, Stern. Criminal procedure: competence to stand trial. Existing law prohibits a person from being tried or adjudged to punishment while that person is mentally incompetent. Existing law establishes a process by which a defendant’s mental competency is evaluated and if the defendant is found incompetent to stand trial, the proceedings are suspended while the defendant receives treatment, with the goal of restoring the defendant to competency.Existing law, in the case of a misdemeanor charge in which the defendant is found incompetent, requires the court to either dismiss the case or hold a hearing to determine if the defendant is eligible for diversion. Under existing law, if the defendant not eligible for diversion, the court may hold another hearing to decide if the defendant should be referred for outpatient treatment, conservatorship, or the CARE program, or if the defendant’s treatment plan should be modified. Existing law also requires the court, if the defendant is already on a grant of diversion for a misdemeanor case, to dismiss the current case and return the defendant to supervision.This bill would remove the option for the court to dismiss the case and would instead require the court to hold a hearing to determine if the defendant is eligible for diversion. If the defendant is not eligible for diversion, the bill would require the court to hold a hearing to determine whether the defendant will be referred to outpatient treatment, conservatorship, or the CARE program, or if the defendant’s treatment plan will be modified.This bill would also remove the requirement that the court dismiss the case if the defendant is already on a grant of diversion for a misdemeanor case.Existing law prohibits a court from suspending proceedings of a prosecution on a charge of driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage for the purpose of allowing the defendant to participate in education, training, or treatment programs.This bill would allow for a mentally incompetent defendant who is charged with misdemeanor driving under the influence to be placed in a mental health diversion program, as specified.If a mentally incompetent defendant is charged with a felony and a misdemeanor and is committed to mental health treatment, as specified, the bill would require the misdemeanor offense to be dismissed.

CA SB 141 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill.
09/12/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:30 a.m.
SB 141, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. (1) The Early Education Act, among other things, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to administer all California state preschool programs, including, but not limited to, part-day and full-day age and developmentally appropriate programs for 3- and 4-year-old children. The act requires, from July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2023, inclusive, at least 5% of funded enrollment to be reserved for children with exceptional needs, requires at least 7.5% of funded enrollment to be reserved for children with exceptional needs commencing July 1, 2025, to June 30, 2026, inclusive, and requires at least 10% of funded enrollment to be reserved for children with exceptional needs commencing July 1, 2026. On and after July 1, 2026, existing law provides that any agency that does not meet those requirements may be put on a conditional contract, as provided.This bill would reestablish the 5% requirement until June 30, 2025, and make any agency that does not meet that requirement eligible to be placed on a conditional contract as of July 1, 2026. For any agency that does not meet the 7.5% or 10% requirements, the bill would delay their eligibility to be placed on a conditional contract to July 1, 2027, and July 1, 2028, respectively.The act requires each state preschool program applicant or contracting agency to give priority for enrollment for part-day and full-day programs according to a specified priority ranking. Existing law requires the 3rd priority for services to be given to eligible 3- and 4-year old children who are not enrolled in a state-funded transitional kindergarten program. Within this priority, the act provides that if 2 or more families have the same income ranking according to the most recent schedule of income ceiling eligibility table, a child from a family in which the primary home language is a language other than English shall be enrolled first.This bill would revise the latter priority criteria to be based on whether those children are identified as dual language learners instead of whether they are from a family in which the primary home language is a language other than English.(2) Existing law establishes the California Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant Program as a state early learning initiative with the goal of expanding access to classroom-based prekindergarten programs. Existing law appropriates $300,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education in both the 2021–22 fiscal year and the 2022–23 fiscal year for allocation to local educational agencies as base grants, enrollment grants, and supplemental grants, as specified. Existing law authorizes the department to allocate or prorate unexpended funds returned by or collected from a grant recipient for grants to local educational agencies for costs associated with the educational expenses of current and future California state preschool program, transitional kindergarten, and kindergarten professionals that support their attainment of required credentials, permits, or professional development in early childhood instruction or child development, including developing competencies in serving inclusive classrooms and dual language learners, as provided.This bill would extend the encumbrance period for those funds, as specified, thereby making an appropriation. The bill would require any remaining unexpended funds to revert to the General Fund on June 30, 2028.(3) Existing law creates the Learning Recovery Emergency Fund in the State Treasury for the purpose of receiving appropriations for school districts, county offices of education, charter schools, and community college districts related to the state of emergency declared by the Governor on March 4, 2020, relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. Former law initially appropriated $7,936,000,000 from the General Fund to the department for transfer to the Learning R

CA SB 142 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Higher education trailer bill.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 195, Statutes of 2023.
SB 142, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Higher education trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program to provide one-time grants for the construction of student housing, or for the acquisition and renovation of commercial properties into student housing for the purpose of providing affordable, low-cost housing options for students enrolled in public postsecondary education in the state. In addition to funding provided for purposes of the program, existing law requires the University of California and the California Community Colleges to fund construction grants using revenue bonds issued by the University of California or community college districts for specified intersegmental projects. Existing law requires General Fund support for certain grants provided to the California Community Colleges to revert to the General Fund and instead be funded with local revenue bonds issued by community college districts, as specified.This bill would make various changes to these provisions. Among these changes, the bill would (A) authorize instead of request the University of California to fund capital outlay planning and construction grants, (B) increase the amounts specified for 2 existing intersegmental projects, (C) authorize instead of require the California Community Colleges to fund construction grants using local financing issued by community college districts, and (D) delete 2 intersegmental projects between the California Community Colleges and the University of California. The bill would require a community college that has already received an allocation of resources to revert those General Fund resources by June 29, 2024, or upon the enactment of the Budget Act of 2024, whichever is later.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature that no later than the Budget Act of 2024, a statewide lease revenue bond or other statewide financing or fiscal approach be developed and included to support the community college affordable student housing projects that have been approved pursuant to the Higher Education Student Housing Grant Program.(2) Existing law establishes the Golden State Teacher Grant Program under the administration of the Student Aid Commission to award grants to students enrolled in professional preparation programs leading to a preliminary teaching credential or a pupil personnel services credential who commit to work for 4 years at a priority school or a California preschool program, as provided. Existing law authorizes the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to determine that a private postsecondary educational institution that offers a professional preparation program approved by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing qualifies for the program if the institution meets certain criteria, including that the institution is accredited by the Senior Colleges and Universities Commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Existing law requires the Student Aid Commission to provide one-time grant funds of up to $10,000 to each enrolled student in a private postsecondary educational institution qualified for the program under these provisions, as specified.This bill would specify that the student be a California resident and that, of the funds appropriated in support of the Golden State Teacher Grant Program, no more than 8% of the total funding may be allocated for purposes of the one-time grants described above. The bill would require that the private postsecondary educational institution be accredited by either the Senior Colleges and Universities Commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges or regionally accredited by an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education. If the institution has no physical presence in California, the bill would require the institution to contract with the Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education to respond to California resident student complaints, as provided.(3) Existing law est

CA SB 1423 - Brian Dwain Dahle
Medi-Cal: critical access hospitals.
04/08/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
SB 1423, as amended, Dahle. Medi-Cal: critical access hospitals. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Under existing law, each hospital designated by the department as a critical access hospital, and certified as such by the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services under the federal Medicare rural hospital flexibility program, is eligible for supplemental payments for Medi-Cal covered outpatient services rendered to Medi-Cal eligible persons. Existing law conditions those payments on receipt of federal financial participation and an appropriation in the annual Budget Act for the nonfederal share of those payments, with supplemental payments being apportioned among critical access hospitals based on their number of Medi-Cal outpatient visits.This bill would require that each critical access hospital that elects to participate be reimbursed at 100% of the hospital’s projected reasonable and allowable costs for covered Medi-Cal services, as defined, furnished in the Medi-Cal fee-for-service and managed care delivery systems for each subject calendar year, effective for dates of service on or after January 1, 2026. The bill would require the department to develop and maintain one or more reimbursement methodologies, or revise one or more existing reimbursement methodologies applicable to participating critical access hospitals, or both, to implement the minimum cost-based payment levels.The bill